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Immune System

NEWS
by ANDREA ROWLAND | June 30, 2003
andrear@herald-mail.com There's more than one way to thwart a wart. You can freeze them and fry them, file them and ignore them. You can even cover them with duct tape. The handyman's helper might be as effective in getting rid of warts as more uncomfortable treatment options, health experts say. Warts are noncancerous skin growths caused by various strains of human papillomavirus that enter the skin through tiny breaks. Warts look different depending upon what part of the body they affect, and which strain of the virus is involved.
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NEWS
by SCOTT BUTKI | January 22, 2003
City's fire chief remains in Frederick hospital Hagerstown City Council members and the mayor said during Tuesday's meeting that they are keeping Hagerstown Fire Chief Gary Hawbaker in their thoughts. Hawbaker, 54, has been hospitalized since Dec. 29 at Frederick (Md.) Memorial Hospital with an immune system disorder. Hawbaker was listed in stable condition at the hospital Tuesday night. Mayor William M. Breichner asked residents to keep Hawbaker in their thoughts and prayers.
NEWS
by MARLO BARNHART | January 6, 2003
As he enters his second week hospitalized with a rare immune system disorder, Hagerstown Fire Chief Gary Hawbaker has been moved from the intensive care unit at Frederick (Md.) Memorial Hospital into a stepdown unit, a nursing supervisor confirmed Sunday night. Hawbaker was hospitalized after being diagnosed with Guillain-Barr Syndrome, in which the body's immune system attacks part of the nervous system, Hagerstown City Administrator Bruce Zimmerman said last week. Hawbaker, 54, was admitted Dec. 29 to Washington County Hospital after noticing a weakness in his legs, Zimmerman said.
NEWS
BY KATE COLEMAN | April 15, 2002
katec@herald-mail.com Lisa Scrivener is coordinating registrations for the seventh annual Hagerstown MS Walk that will take place Saturday, April 20, at Antietam National Battlefield. Why? "It's just being part of the family," she says. The Scrivener family - the whole family - has been involved in the National Multiple Sclerosis Society's fund-raising events since Bill Scrivener - Lisa's brother-in-law - was diagnosed with MS in 1991. Bill's sister, Virginia Scrivener, helped to start the walk in Hagerstown in 1996.
NEWS
October 9, 2000
Hope may be on the horizon By ANDREA BROWN-HURLEY / Staff Writer There is hope for a cure for Alzheimer's disease, according to the National Institutes of Health and the National Institute on Aging. Twenty years of scientific research has "opened numerous pathways that could lead to effective treatments for the disease," according to the agencies' Alzheimer's Web site. The National Institute on Aging, which is a division of the NIH, is trying to determine whether estrogen replacement therapy can delay or prevent memory loss and Alzheimer's disease in women who have a parent, sibling or child with Alzheimer's, according to the Alzheimer's Association of Western Maryland.
NEWS
August 6, 1999
(Denise Troxell is a Sharpsburg resident who had a double-lung transplant two years ago. This is another column about that event, and her life.) I realize now why it has taken me 13 columns to actually get to the story of my double lung transplant. All week I have been avoiding the subject in my head. It's one thing to describe the joyous struggle to live in the world where your senses can usually find something beautiful to distract you from your troubles. It's another thing entirely to remember and try to describe two months when your body almost gave out and all you could see and hear and touch and smell were the machines that were keeping you alive and the people running them.
NEWS
By Lynn F. Little | April 15, 1997
Number 10: Safe food handling practices are the ones most likely to preserve food's top quality. Keeping hot foods hot and cold foods cold inhibits growth of the microorganisms that can spoil your food or make you ill. Storage at the proper temperature retains the fresh appearance, pleasant aroma, and agreeable texture that contribute to an enjoyable dining experience. Number nine: Safe food handling lets you obtain the full nutritional benefits from the food you have chosen.
NEWS
January 16, 1997
By LISA GRAYBEAL Staff Writer, Waynesboro WAYNESBORO, Pa. - Two-year-old Caleb Matthew Reely knows that something's not quite right with him. Though he's as active as most children his age, Caleb's parents, Richard and Louise Reely of Five Forks Road, said their only son instinctively knows to regulate his play time so he doesn't get too tired. He will rest if he feels a lot of pain. "He has his down times," Richard said. What he doesn't know is that he may not live for more than six to nine years if his rare blood disease, known as Wiskott-Aldridge Syndrome, can't be treated.
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