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Immune System

NEWS
by JANET HEIM | March 30, 2006
GAPLAND - Seven-year-old Susannah Willems has always loved being around her big brother, Zach, but now their bond is stronger than ever. Zach, 13, saved her life. In a painful procedure last fall, doctors at Johns Hopkins Hospital in Baltimore extracted bone marrow from Zach to fight the deadly leukemia Susannah has been battling since 2001. "Well, 'cause she's my sister," Zach said of what he did. "I didn't think twice about it. It seemed like the normal thing to do. " Susannah was just 3 when she was diagnosed with acute lymphoblast lymphoma, a disease that strikes nearly 4,000 Americans, most of them children, every year.
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NEWS
by SCOTT BUTKI | January 2, 2003
scottb@herald-mail.com HAGERSTOWN - Hagerstown Fire Chief Gary Hawbaker has been hospitalized after being diagnosed with Guillain-Barr Syndrome - a rare disorder in which the body's immune system attacks part of the nervous system, sometimes causing paralysis, Hagerstown City Administrator Bruce Zimmerman said Tuesday. Hawbaker was in serious but stable condition Tuesday night at Frederick (Md.) Memorial Hospital. Hawbaker, 54, was admitted Sunday to Washington County Hospital after noticing a weakness in his legs, Zimmerman said.
NEWS
by JULIE E. GREENE | November 6, 2006
HALFWAY - In July 2003, Joe Dill thought he'd be dead within a year. He prepaid for his funeral package, wrote his obituary and organized his belongings. Dill had been diagnosed in March 2003 with diffuse scleroderma - an autoimmune disease with no known cause or cure - and was about to embark as a test subject for a stem cell transplant with chemotherapy treatment. He didn't know whether it would help him or kill him. Three years later, Dill, 62, is still living with the effects of scleroderma, but he no longer has any diseased scleroderma cells and is living an active life in Halfway, volunteering for Big Brothers Big Sisters, swimming, fishing and visiting friends and family.
NEWS
By KIMBERLY YAKOWSKI | November 11, 1999
Television viewers looking for spiritual and family programming have another choice with the addition of W42CK, a Christian-oriented station. The Three Angels Broadcasting Network based in Illinois went on the air locally in October. Its signal comes from a transmitter in the Williamsport area, according to Pastor Jim Hoffer of the Hagerstown Seventh-day Adventist Church. The network, which is a nonprofit ministry of the Seventh-day Adventist Church, is broadcast across the United States, Central America, Europe and North Africa.
NEWS
by MEG H. PARTINGTON | July 3, 2006
While health officials worldwide strategize ways to prevent a bird-flu pandemic, the average person might not worry about the threat that childhood diseases pose to their families and society as a whole. Immunizations have eliminated diseases such as polio from the U.S. and made others that once commonly killed children rare. But there is no room for complacency in public health, says Dr. Greg Lyon-Loftus with Mont Alto (Pa.) Family Practice. "We take it for granted that these things aren't going to happen today," Lyon-Loftus says.
NEWS
October 9, 2005
Editor's note: Each week, The Herald-Mail invites readers to answer poll questions on its Web site, www.herald-mail.com. Readers also may submit comments about the poll question when voting. Each Sunday, a sampling of reader comments will appear in The Herald-Mail. Last week's poll question was: Do you plan to get a flu shot? Of the 209 votes received as of 7 p.m. Saturday, 110 people (53 percent) said they plan to get a flu shot, while 99 people (47 percent) said they were not planning to get a shot.
NEWS
January 19, 2007
QUINCY, Pa. - Residents learning more about chemical contamination in their wells were told Thursday by the Pennsylvania Department of Environmental Protection that, in a "worst-case scenario," all efforts to mitigate the problem could stop in June. No funding has yet been secured from the state for the Hazardous Sites Cleanup program for the next fiscal year, officials said. The program's funding and future have been in limbo every year for about four years, and contractors are leery of working with it, officials said.
NEWS
October 17, 2003
One of the worst things elected officials can do is to ask citizens to serve on an advisory committee, then bypass them when a really tough issue arises. So yes, the Washington County Commissioners should send a health department proposal for tougher treatment of well water to the Water Quality Advisory Commission. But the commissioners should be aware that this is one problem that can't be solved just by studying it. The issue arose this week when Laurie Bucher, the local health department's director of environmental health, asked the commissioners to require more stringent disinfection procedures to rid local water wells of bacterial contamination.
NEWS
April 2, 2001
What to do if your friend drinks By Elizabeth Suh According to the National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism, www.niaaa.nih.gov , alcoholism includes: Craving - A strong need, or compulsion, to drink. Impaired control - The inability to limit one's drinking. Physical dependence - Withdrawal symptoms, such as nausea, sweating, shakiness and anxiety, when alcohol use is stopped after a period of heavy drinking. Tolerance - The need for increasing amounts of alcohol to feel its effects.
NEWS
By ERIN CUNNINGHAM | June 9, 2007
SMITHSBURG - With two older siblings in medical school and a mother who is a local physician, Misbah Shafi said her decision to become a doctor was not surprising. Misbah, a 17-year-old who will be a senior at Smithsburg High School in the fall, said she will take a step toward that goal by working as an intern at the National Cancer Institute in Frederick, Md. The Hagerstown resident was one of about 50 students selected for the competitive internship, and is the only one chosen from Washington County.
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