Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: HeraldMail HomeCollectionsImmune System
IN THE NEWS

Immune System

NEWS
September 19, 1997
By VANDANA SINHA Staff Writer People who indulge in promiscuous unprotected sex are putting themselves at risk for catching viruses that can be as deadly as AIDS. One viral sexually transmitted disease in particular, human papilloma virus, or HPV, is evident in local patients "by the boatload," and is linked to cervical cancer, said Dr. George Manger, a Hagerstown physician who has specialized in gynecology for 22 years. There are more than 30 types of bacterial and viral STDs, some of which cannot be killed by current medicine.
Advertisement
NEWS
By KATHY MORRISEY / Special to The Herald-Mail | April 5, 2010
What's the best defense against germs? Soap and water. It sounds simple, but washing your hands thoroughly and frequently is the single best way to protect your body from germs that cause infection. Wash your hands after coughing, sneezing or using the rest room, and before preparing or eating food at a minimum. When soap and water aren't readily available, use an alcohol-based hand sanitizer. In addition to keeping your hands clean, there are other important steps you can take to protect your body from infections.
NEWS
January 2, 1998
Have a cold? Echinacea may be the remedy for you By TERI JOHNSON Staff Writer Weary of coping with colds and flu, many Americans are turning to echinacea. The medicinal herb, used centuries ago by Native Americans, is experiencing renewed popularity with people seeking to prevent illness or to knock out symptoms that already have begun. Echinacea, pronounced ek-a-NAY-sha, raises the body's resistance to infections by stimulating the immune system.
NEWS
by LAURA ERNDE | March 3, 2004
laurae@herald-mail.com ANNAPOLIS - A legislative committee has killed a Washington County lawmaker's bill aimed at keeping young people out of tanning beds. Sen. Donald F. Munson, R-Washington, wanted to require anyone younger than 18 to get a doctor's permission before using a tanning bed. Senate Education Health and Environmental Affairs Committee chairwoman Paula C. Hollinger said she wasn't convinced there was enough of a health risk to warrant such strict regulation.
NEWS
By JULIE E. GREENE | November 6, 1998
SHARPSBURG - Sharpsburg resident Denise Troxell, the recipient of a double lung transplant last year, has been appointed to a state council to promote organ and tissue donation, according to the governor's office. "I'm honored that I got picked," the Sharpsburg Town Councilwoman said Friday. Troxell is one of two donor recipients on the Advisory Council on Organ and Tissue Donation Awareness. The 16-member council also includes the member of a donor's family and several health experts.
LIFESTYLE
January 6, 2012
A reported case of tuberculosis at an area high school has made headlines. Tuberculosis, or TB, bacteria are spread through the air.  When a person with active TB disease of the lungs or throat coughs, sneezes, or speaks, people nearby might breathe in these bacteria and become infected. Facts about TB:  Latent TB infection.  When a person is exposed to (breathes in) the TB germs, they may develop a latent TB infection. People with latent TB have no symptoms and can't pass the germ.
NEWS
by DAVID DISHNEAU | March 16, 2004
FREDERICK, Md. - The stainless steel door to the world's only biological containment patient-care suite bangs as loudly as a prison gate - only nobody enters involuntarily. Because of medical privacy laws, managers of the Army biodefense research program at Fort Detrick rely on laboratory workers to self-report accidents like the one that recently put an Ebola researcher in "the slammer" for 21 days of observation. Workers' privacy could be reduced, though, by new "biosurety" rules the Army is developing for enhanced lab security, Col. Erik A. Henchal, commander of the U.S. Army Medical Institute of Infectious Diseases, said Monday.
NEWS
By CANDICE BOSELY | October 26, 2005
martinsburg@herald-mail.com MARTINSBURG, W.Va. - About 1,500 veterans have received flu shots at the Veterans Affairs Medical Center in Martinsburg, with additional clinics scheduled for today and in November and December. "I think the turnout has been about what we expected," said Barbara Corbin, spokeswoman for the medical center. "It's been a good, steady flow. " The number of veterans who have received shots so far only includes those who received one in the medical center's lobby - not those who received one from their physician or from one of the medical center's six Community-Based Outpatient Clinics.
NEWS
By DON AINES | November 23, 1998
SHIPPENSBURG, Pa. - The condition of a Shippensburg University student diagnosed with bacterial meningitis has been upgraded and others at the university have been given preventive antibiotics, according to a spokesman. "He's in serious condition, which is really an upgrade of his previous condition, which was critical," university spokesman Pete Gigliotti said Sunday. The student was taken to Chambersburg Hospital Friday morning, he said. Gigliotti said the unnamed 20-year-old man's roommate and 21 other people who may have come in close contact with him have been given preventive antibiotics.
NEWS
by JANET HEIM | March 30, 2006
GAPLAND - Seven-year-old Susannah Willems has always loved being around her big brother, Zach, but now their bond is stronger than ever. Zach, 13, saved her life. In a painful procedure last fall, doctors at Johns Hopkins Hospital in Baltimore extracted bone marrow from Zach to fight the deadly leukemia Susannah has been battling since 2001. "Well, 'cause she's my sister," Zach said of what he did. "I didn't think twice about it. It seemed like the normal thing to do. " Susannah was just 3 when she was diagnosed with acute lymphoblast lymphoma, a disease that strikes nearly 4,000 Americans, most of them children, every year.
The Herald-Mail Articles
|