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by ANDREA ROWLAND | June 30, 2003
andrear@herald-mail.com There's more than one way to thwart a wart. You can freeze them and fry them, file them and ignore them. You can even cover them with duct tape. The handyman's helper might be as effective in getting rid of warts as more uncomfortable treatment options, health experts say. Warts are noncancerous skin growths caused by various strains of human papillomavirus that enter the skin through tiny breaks. Warts look different depending upon what part of the body they affect, and which strain of the virus is involved.
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NEWS
by FEDORA COPLEY | January 24, 2006
Imagine this: You walk into a hotel room. As you open the door, you feel smooth, too-slick wood beneath your fingers. In front of you is a brown, scraggly rug. You smell cleaning chemicals in the air. Is your anxiety rising? "All your senses affect your stress level," says Kathleen Hall, founder of The Stress Institute and columnist for Pink magazine. Hall's new book, "A Life In Balance, Nourishing the Four Roots of True Happiness," talks about stress in everyday lives, and how to balance stress positively.
NEWS
January 16, 1997
By LISA GRAYBEAL Staff Writer, Waynesboro WAYNESBORO, Pa. - Two-year-old Caleb Matthew Reely knows that something's not quite right with him. Though he's as active as most children his age, Caleb's parents, Richard and Louise Reely of Five Forks Road, said their only son instinctively knows to regulate his play time so he doesn't get too tired. He will rest if he feels a lot of pain. "He has his down times," Richard said. What he doesn't know is that he may not live for more than six to nine years if his rare blood disease, known as Wiskott-Aldridge Syndrome, can't be treated.
NEWS
October 9, 2000
Hope may be on the horizon By ANDREA BROWN-HURLEY / Staff Writer There is hope for a cure for Alzheimer's disease, according to the National Institutes of Health and the National Institute on Aging. Twenty years of scientific research has "opened numerous pathways that could lead to effective treatments for the disease," according to the agencies' Alzheimer's Web site. The National Institute on Aging, which is a division of the NIH, is trying to determine whether estrogen replacement therapy can delay or prevent memory loss and Alzheimer's disease in women who have a parent, sibling or child with Alzheimer's, according to the Alzheimer's Association of Western Maryland.
NEWS
Lynn Little | January 31, 2013
Stress management isn't a quick fix you use only in emergencies. Rather, it's a set of tools you can use to deal with the big and little issues that arise every day. Making a commitment to practice stress prevention strategies will pay off over time. Stress is more likely to rear its ugly head if you're not taking care of yourself.  Take time for yourself. Just 10 to 20 minutes of quiet reflection might bring relief from chronic stress as well as increase your tolerance to it. Use the time to listen to music, relax and try to think of pleasant things.
NEWS
by GREGORY T. SIMMONS | January 28, 2004
gregs@herald-mail.com Gary Hawbaker says what happened to him on Dec. 29, 2002, was like an ice storm bringing down a power grid. Hawbaker, 55, is returning today as Hagerstown's fire chief after more than a year of battling an obscure nerve disease that almost completely paralyzed him. It can be fatal. "This is my love," Hawbaker said in an interview Tuesday. "There's two things that kept me going through this. One was my family. The other was getting back to the job I love.
NEWS
BY KATE COLEMAN | April 15, 2002
katec@herald-mail.com Lisa Scrivener is coordinating registrations for the seventh annual Hagerstown MS Walk that will take place Saturday, April 20, at Antietam National Battlefield. Why? "It's just being part of the family," she says. The Scrivener family - the whole family - has been involved in the National Multiple Sclerosis Society's fund-raising events since Bill Scrivener - Lisa's brother-in-law - was diagnosed with MS in 1991. Bill's sister, Virginia Scrivener, helped to start the walk in Hagerstown in 1996.
NEWS
August 6, 1999
(Denise Troxell is a Sharpsburg resident who had a double-lung transplant two years ago. This is another column about that event, and her life.) I realize now why it has taken me 13 columns to actually get to the story of my double lung transplant. All week I have been avoiding the subject in my head. It's one thing to describe the joyous struggle to live in the world where your senses can usually find something beautiful to distract you from your troubles. It's another thing entirely to remember and try to describe two months when your body almost gave out and all you could see and hear and touch and smell were the machines that were keeping you alive and the people running them.
NEWS
December 1, 2000
Health department flu shot clinic Saturday for people at risk A Washington County Health Department influenza and pneumonia vaccine clinic for adults will be offered Saturday, Dec. 9, from 9:30 a.m. to 2 p.m. at North Hagerstown High School, 1200 Pennsylvania Ave. in Hagerstown. The clinic is for people in the Category 1 risk classification, said Pat Firey, program supervisor in maternal/childhood nursing at the health department. Clinic nurses will ask people if they are "well," Firey said.
NEWS
By MARK ROTH / Pittsburgh Post-Gazette | December 1, 2008
Dr. Donald Burke has been working on an AIDS vaccine since 1986. "At the time I started," said the dean of the University of Pittsburgh's Graduate School of Public Health, "the usual question was, 'How long is it going to be before we have an AIDS vaccine?' "So being conservative, I said, 'It'll probably take 10 years.' So 1996 came around, and by then, I was still saying 10 years, and now 2006 has come and gone and I don't say anything anymore because it has proven much more difficult than we imagined.
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