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Immune System

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NEWS
By Lynn F. Little | April 15, 1997
Number 10: Safe food handling practices are the ones most likely to preserve food's top quality. Keeping hot foods hot and cold foods cold inhibits growth of the microorganisms that can spoil your food or make you ill. Storage at the proper temperature retains the fresh appearance, pleasant aroma, and agreeable texture that contribute to an enjoyable dining experience. Number nine: Safe food handling lets you obtain the full nutritional benefits from the food you have chosen.
NEWS
by MARLO BARNHART | January 6, 2003
As he enters his second week hospitalized with a rare immune system disorder, Hagerstown Fire Chief Gary Hawbaker has been moved from the intensive care unit at Frederick (Md.) Memorial Hospital into a stepdown unit, a nursing supervisor confirmed Sunday night. Hawbaker was hospitalized after being diagnosed with Guillain-Barr Syndrome, in which the body's immune system attacks part of the nervous system, Hagerstown City Administrator Bruce Zimmerman said last week. Hawbaker, 54, was admitted Dec. 29 to Washington County Hospital after noticing a weakness in his legs, Zimmerman said.
NEWS
April 29, 2010
WASHINGTON (AP) -- A first-of-a-kind prostate cancer treatment that uses the body's immune system to fight the disease received federal approval Thursday, offering an important alternative to more intensive treatments like chemotherapy. Dendreon Corp.'s Provenge vaccine trains the immune system to fight tumors. It's called a "vaccine" even though it treats disease rather than prevents it. Doctors have been trying to develop such a therapy for decades, and Provenge is the first to win approval from the Food and Drug Administration.
LIFESTYLE
By CHRIS COPLEY | chrisc@herald-mail.com | March 1, 2013
Americans live in a food paradise. Food is generally plentiful, cheap and made to be convenient. And, despite the occasional food-poisoning event, the food supply is consistently safe to eat. Government food-safety regulations limit amounts of pesticides, microbial pathogens and other contaminants on produce and in manufactured products. Inspectors check on food producers, food manufacturers restaurants and others in the food chain. But researchers are examining whether Americans' food-safety vigilance has a downside.
NEWS
by JANET HEIM | February 28, 2007
GAPLAND - Susannah Willems is the picture of health. She has a full head of wavy blond hair and is, her mom says, at almost 4 feet, 8 inches, the tallest student in the third grade at Pleasant Valley Elementary School. "It's amazing. Thank God. If you look at her, you'd never know all she's been through," her mother Christina Willems said. Until a year and a half ago, Susannah was battling for her life. The enemy was the acute lymphoblast leukemia, diagnosed in 2001. The cancer attacked her bone marrow, leaving her unable to fight infection.
NEWS
by JANET HEIM | February 27, 2007
GAPLAND - Susannah Willems is the picture of health. She has a full head of wavy blonde hair and is, her mom says, at almost 4 feet, 8 inches, the tallest student in the third grade at Pleasant Valley Elementary School. "It's amazing. Thank God. If you look at her, you'd never know all she's been through," her mother Christina Willems said. Until a year-and-a-half ago, Susannah was battling for her life. The enemy was the acute lymphoblast leukemia diagnosed in 2001. The cancer attacked her bone marrow, leaving her unable to fight infection.
NEWS
by SCOTT BUTKI | January 22, 2003
City's fire chief remains in Frederick hospital Hagerstown City Council members and the mayor said during Tuesday's meeting that they are keeping Hagerstown Fire Chief Gary Hawbaker in their thoughts. Hawbaker, 54, has been hospitalized since Dec. 29 at Frederick (Md.) Memorial Hospital with an immune system disorder. Hawbaker was listed in stable condition at the hospital Tuesday night. Mayor William M. Breichner asked residents to keep Hawbaker in their thoughts and prayers.
NEWS
By DAVE McMILLION | June 3, 2010
Kalyn Berry never participated in any skip days and she always made sure her doctor's appointments were after school. It was that mind-set that allowed the 18-year-old to record perfect attendance throughout her school years. "Including kindergarten," her mother Kate Berry proudly said Thursday. Kalyn, a Williamsport High School senior who graduated Thursday night at Hagerstown Community College, said she received a certificate from the school system this week honoring her perfect attendance.
NEWS
December 24, 2008
The Annual Multiple Sclerosis Walk will be held at Antietam National Battlefield Saturday, April 18. This family event is open to all those who are interested in helping win the fight against multiple sclerosis. Registration is now open at www.walkMSmaryland.org or by calling 1-800-344-4867. Walkers are encouraged to form teams and raise funds to help the National Multiple Sclerosis Society put an end to this devastating disease. MS is a chronic, unpredictable neurological disease that affects the central nervous system.
NEWS
By HEATHER KEELS | heather.keels@herald-mail.com | June 3, 2011
The audience at Smithsburg High School's graduation had been asked to hold its applause until the end of a list of awards, but at the mention of one particular honor, gasps and murmurs were followed by a round of clapping and cheering. The award for 14 years of perfect attendance went to graduating senior Dylan Eyler, who has not missed a day of school since he started pre-kindergarten, according to school officials. Eyler, 17, of Cascade, Md., said after the ceremony that he did not initially set out to achieve perfect attendance, but as the years added up, he became reluctant to break the streak.
ARTICLES BY DATE
LIFESTYLE
By CHRIS COPLEY | chrisc@herald-mail.com | March 1, 2013
Americans live in a food paradise. Food is generally plentiful, cheap and made to be convenient. And, despite the occasional food-poisoning event, the food supply is consistently safe to eat. Government food-safety regulations limit amounts of pesticides, microbial pathogens and other contaminants on produce and in manufactured products. Inspectors check on food producers, food manufacturers restaurants and others in the food chain. But researchers are examining whether Americans' food-safety vigilance has a downside.
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NEWS
Lynn Little | January 31, 2013
Stress management isn't a quick fix you use only in emergencies. Rather, it's a set of tools you can use to deal with the big and little issues that arise every day. Making a commitment to practice stress prevention strategies will pay off over time. Stress is more likely to rear its ugly head if you're not taking care of yourself.  Take time for yourself. Just 10 to 20 minutes of quiet reflection might bring relief from chronic stress as well as increase your tolerance to it. Use the time to listen to music, relax and try to think of pleasant things.
NEWS
By HEATHER KEELS | heather.keels@herald-mail.com | June 3, 2011
The audience at Smithsburg High School's graduation had been asked to hold its applause until the end of a list of awards, but at the mention of one particular honor, gasps and murmurs were followed by a round of clapping and cheering. The award for 14 years of perfect attendance went to graduating senior Dylan Eyler, who has not missed a day of school since he started pre-kindergarten, according to school officials. Eyler, 17, of Cascade, Md., said after the ceremony that he did not initially set out to achieve perfect attendance, but as the years added up, he became reluctant to break the streak.
NEWS
By DAVE McMILLION | June 3, 2010
Kalyn Berry never participated in any skip days and she always made sure her doctor's appointments were after school. It was that mind-set that allowed the 18-year-old to record perfect attendance throughout her school years. "Including kindergarten," her mother Kate Berry proudly said Thursday. Kalyn, a Williamsport High School senior who graduated Thursday night at Hagerstown Community College, said she received a certificate from the school system this week honoring her perfect attendance.
NEWS
April 29, 2010
WASHINGTON (AP) -- A first-of-a-kind prostate cancer treatment that uses the body's immune system to fight the disease received federal approval Thursday, offering an important alternative to more intensive treatments like chemotherapy. Dendreon Corp.'s Provenge vaccine trains the immune system to fight tumors. It's called a "vaccine" even though it treats disease rather than prevents it. Doctors have been trying to develop such a therapy for decades, and Provenge is the first to win approval from the Food and Drug Administration.
NEWS
December 24, 2008
The Annual Multiple Sclerosis Walk will be held at Antietam National Battlefield Saturday, April 18. This family event is open to all those who are interested in helping win the fight against multiple sclerosis. Registration is now open at www.walkMSmaryland.org or by calling 1-800-344-4867. Walkers are encouraged to form teams and raise funds to help the National Multiple Sclerosis Society put an end to this devastating disease. MS is a chronic, unpredictable neurological disease that affects the central nervous system.
NEWS
by JANET HEIM | February 28, 2007
GAPLAND - Susannah Willems is the picture of health. She has a full head of wavy blond hair and is, her mom says, at almost 4 feet, 8 inches, the tallest student in the third grade at Pleasant Valley Elementary School. "It's amazing. Thank God. If you look at her, you'd never know all she's been through," her mother Christina Willems said. Until a year and a half ago, Susannah was battling for her life. The enemy was the acute lymphoblast leukemia, diagnosed in 2001. The cancer attacked her bone marrow, leaving her unable to fight infection.
NEWS
by JANET HEIM | February 27, 2007
GAPLAND - Susannah Willems is the picture of health. She has a full head of wavy blonde hair and is, her mom says, at almost 4 feet, 8 inches, the tallest student in the third grade at Pleasant Valley Elementary School. "It's amazing. Thank God. If you look at her, you'd never know all she's been through," her mother Christina Willems said. Until a year-and-a-half ago, Susannah was battling for her life. The enemy was the acute lymphoblast leukemia diagnosed in 2001. The cancer attacked her bone marrow, leaving her unable to fight infection.
NEWS
by FEDORA COPLEY | January 24, 2006
Imagine this: You walk into a hotel room. As you open the door, you feel smooth, too-slick wood beneath your fingers. In front of you is a brown, scraggly rug. You smell cleaning chemicals in the air. Is your anxiety rising? "All your senses affect your stress level," says Kathleen Hall, founder of The Stress Institute and columnist for Pink magazine. Hall's new book, "A Life In Balance, Nourishing the Four Roots of True Happiness," talks about stress in everyday lives, and how to balance stress positively.
NEWS
by GREGORY T. SIMMONS | January 28, 2004
gregs@herald-mail.com Gary Hawbaker says what happened to him on Dec. 29, 2002, was like an ice storm bringing down a power grid. Hawbaker, 55, is returning today as Hagerstown's fire chief after more than a year of battling an obscure nerve disease that almost completely paralyzed him. It can be fatal. "This is my love," Hawbaker said in an interview Tuesday. "There's two things that kept me going through this. One was my family. The other was getting back to the job I love.
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