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NEWS
By ANDREW SCHOTZ | May 11, 2009
FUNKSTOWN -- Playing off the politics and wit of Saturday's White House Correspondents Association get-together, Washington County's Democrats dabbled in humor at their annual dinner on Monday. Del. John P. Donoghue, D-Washington, joked about Lt. Gov. Anthony Brown claiming to be the father of Donoghue's son P.J. U.S. Rep. Christopher Van Hollen, D-Md., quipped that he won't get involved in a paternity suit between the two men. Washington County Commissioner Kristin B. Aleshire, a Democrat, cautioned people not to overbid on George W. Bush playing cards in the silent auction.
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NEWS
April 26, 2007
Lois Walden will share her reflections on the spirituality of humor at a dinner for women Thursday, May 3, from 6:30 to 8:30 p.m. at the parish center of St. Ann Catholic Church, 1525 Oak Hill Ave. in Hagerstown. Walden, a registered nurse, will speak on the topic, "A Time to Laugh. " With more than 20 years of experience in the fields of nursing, nutrition, fitness and education, Walden will address the issue of humor and health in a woman's spirituality. To register for the $10 event, call 301-733-0410, ext. 11.
OPINION
November 16, 2011
I fear for America's commercial sense of humor, specifically as it relates to the brewing industry. I say this because of the death of boxing legend Joe Frazier. First, I think anyone with a decade of Super Bowl watching under the belt can attest to the fact that the last really good year for humorous commercials was probably circa 2004. Much of this came as a result of the dot.com collapse. At the dawn of the new millennium, you might recall, there were bushels of "hi-tech" companies that had a lot of good ideas for funny television commercials, even though they did not appear to be entirely sure what it was they were selling.
NEWS
By LISA TEDRICK PREJEAN | October 17, 2008
I was sitting on our deck last Saturday grading essays when our dog suddenly decided to get affectionate. She jumped up, put both paws on my legs and began to sniff the papers in my lap. Before she could take a bite, I scooped the papers out of range. Whew. That was a close one. What would I have told my students? "Sorry, my dog ate your homework. " The automatic "A" that would come along with that statement would not disappoint, I'm sure. Perhaps I'd even have offers to dog-sit for free: "And while we're watching your dog, Mrs. Prejean, we'll teach her that paper tastes yummy or how she can have fun ripping it up and spreading it across your yard.
NEWS
March 18, 1999
By ANDREA BROWN-HURLEY and KIMBERLY YAKOWSKI / Staff Writers photo: RICHARD T. MEAGHER / staff photographer Union employees at the Good Humor-Breyers Ice Cream plant in Hagerstown, who have been working without a contract, picketed in front of area stores selling their products Wednesday. [cont. from front page ] Some 431 union members have been working without a contract at the Frederick Street ice cream plant since August 1998, said Larry Lorshbaugh, president of United Steelworkers of America Local 9386.
NEWS
By LYDIA HADFIELD | November 30, 1999
Limericks are to poetry what slapstick is to theatre. They're completely irreverent, sometimes crude, and a lot of fun. The origin of limericks is unknown. Some believe they were created in the 18th century by Irish soldiers returning to Limerick, Ireland, from France. Whatever its beginnings, the poetic form wasn't called a limerick until long after the verse had been in use. Limericks were known as nonsense verse. Improvised by peasants and in pubs, nonsense verse developed a reputation for low-brow humor.
NEWS
by ANDREW SCHOTZ | June 5, 2005
andrews@herald-mail.com MONT ALTO, PA. - It's easy to conclude that John A. Davidson had fun dreaming up his own mock, baseball-laden funeral when he entered a Hagerstown Suns' contest in 2003. His writing drew upon sports history, theater, culture, music, liquor and a grab bag of puns. His wife, Barbara Davidson, said he was thrilled to win the grand prize: a free funeral worth about $5,500 to $6,000. Sixteen months later, John Davidson died at the age of 70. Barbara Davidson, who lives near Mont Alto, redeemed her husband's prize from Gerald N. Minnich Funeral Home in Hagerstown, the contest's sponsor.
NEWS
By JENNIFER FITCH | June 12, 2009
MERCERSBURG, Pa. -- James Buchanan High School's class of 2009 left behind laughs as its legacy -- from a fake marriage proposal to a tractor's arrival at the prom. The class T-shirts included not only a list of the 171 graduates, but also a multiple-choice test: The thing that is not tested at JBHS: a) PSSA b) 4Sight c) the water Krystal Leasure, Rachel Barrett and Tressa Donahue, all 18, said the aging building's shortcomings, including the brown water, are frustrating, but they found the atmosphere to be better than other schools.
NEWS
by CHRIS COPELY | May 29, 2005
chrisc@herald-mail.com Daily life for ordinary people living in small towns or the countryside might not seem like interesting subject material for art or poetry. But there is a long tradition in American art, literature and music of portraying ordinary life and examining larger themes of the human condition. Americans have celebrated the work of painter Gramma Moses' primitive-style paintings; folk music such as the bluegrass and gospel featured in the movie "O Brother, Where Art Thou?"
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