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NEWS
by KATE COLEMAN | March 31, 2003
katec@herald-mail.com Joel Goodman discovered the health benefits of humor at a very unfunny time in his life. In 1977 his father was diagnosed with an aortic aneurysm and traveled to Texas and famed heart surgeon Dr. Michael DeBakey. Goodman flew from Saratoga Springs, N.Y., to provide support. The proverbial funny thing happened on the way to the hospital, Goodman says. Alvin, the hotel shuttle bus driver, was a magician, Goodman says. His trick was to share his childlike, playful sense of humor with Goodman and his mother.
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NEWS
by ANDREW SCHOTZ | May 23, 2006
HAGERSTOWN Unilever North American Ice Cream is investing $7 million to upgrade its Good Humor-Breyers plant in Hagerstown, Plant Manager Ken Wells said Monday. As a result, the plant is hiring about 50 more employees, increasing its total to about 525 employees, he said. Wells said the wages for the new jobs are "above average," but declined to say specifically what they are. Many of the new workers will be hand packers, who take finished products and box them for distribution, he said.
NEWS
By LEANNE ITALIE | July 17, 2009
There's a bit in the new "Night at the Museum" movie where "The Thinker" comes alive to catcall a nearby hottie of a statue. "Hey baby, check out the gun show goin' on over here," he struts, flexing his killer biceps. "Boom, Boom. Firepower!" The scene sends my fourth-grader and her friends into hysterical fits of laughter every time they re-enact it, complete with New York accent just like Rodin's naked guy. But why, of all the schtick in that movie - and in their lives - does it crack them up, along with so much other playground humor?
NEWS
August 11, 2004
Taste of the Town 2004 vendors will include: AC&T Co. Always Catering Burhan's Station Clarion Banquet Services Cracker Barrel Dimensions Catering Fireside Restaurant Fountainhead Country Club Good Humor-Breyers Kerch's Ribs & Chicken Leiter's Fine Catering Inc. Outback Steak House Pure Bliss & Sandwich Co. ...
NEWS
By DAVE McMILLION | January 30, 1999
George Carlin strolled onto the stage at the Maryland Theatre Saturday night and greeted the crowd with a profane-laden hello. It was the langauge many die-hard Carlin fans were waiting for, and it didn't take long. "Just wanted to make you feel at home," quipped the 61-year-old comedian. Then in classic Carlin style, he began making a mockery of U.S. customs that he says make no sense at all, like airport security and germ-killing hand lotion. Despite all the efforts to find explosives, airport officials "haven't found one bomb in one bag. There are no bombs," said Carlin.
OBITUARIES
By JANET HEIM | janeth@herald-mail.com | October 15, 2011
Grant Haines survived polio as a baby, was given last rites after contracting meningitis during World War II, recovered from malaria and overcame cancer about 20 years ago. Despite that, he lived to age 95, the same age his mother lived to. "He had about everything you can think of," said Doris Haines, his wife of 57 years. Grant grew up in Winchester, Va., attending Handley High School and graduating from Shenandoah Valley Academy in 1936. Despite a slight limp from a bout with polio, he was athletic and lettered in football and basketball.
OBITUARIES
By JANET HEIM | janeth@herald-mail.com | September 22, 2012
William S. “Bill” Higgins Jr. was one of those people who made friends wherever he went. He lived his life with humor and a positive spirit that attracted people. “He wanted to get to know people,” said only child Amy Higgins Ryan of Hampstead, Md. “In airports, I'd bury my nose in a book. He'd get to know people, he'd know their life story,” said Susan “Susie” Higgins, Bill's wife of 43 years. Bill met people through work, church, volunteer activities, when out for dinner, in the neighborhood - anywhere people were.
NEWS
by PEPPER BALLARD | November 14, 2003
pepperb@herald-mail.com Finding humor in local news, such as West Virginia's decision to legalize eating road kill, has been Tim Rowland's calling for the past 10 years, but it wasn't until now that The Herald-Mail columnist decided to put those jeers and jabs into a book. He has published his first book, "Petrified Fact - Stories of Bizarre Behavior that Really Happened, Mostly," a collection of 86 of what Rowland said were the "wackiest" columns he has written since he became a columnist 10 years ago. Rowland, 43, of Halfway, said he decided to put the book together, in part, because over the years people have asked him whether he would compile his columns into a book.
NEWS
September 6, 2008
WAYNESBORO, Pa. - The Trinity Players, a ministry of the Trinity United Church of Christ (TUCC) in Waynesboro, will present the musical "Once Upon A Parable" at 4 p.m. today and 10:45 a.m. and 4 p.m. on Sunday, Sept. 7. Performances will be in the church's Harbaugh Hall at 30 W. North St. Admission is free. "Once Upon A Parable" is a musical for young voices by Allen Pote and Tom Long. It features a group of storytellers who capture the humor and contemporary nature of some of Jesus' most familiar parables.
NEWS
January 20, 2006
In December 2004, humor columnist Dave Barry announced he would take a year off from writing his weekly column, which The Herald-Mail has carried for many years. Assuming that he would return in 2006, The Herald-Mail spent a year reprinting "classic" Barry columns. Now Barry has decided that he will no longer write a weekly column. In a Dec. 28 interview with Editor & Publisher, Barry said that while he will write an occasional column for he Miami Herald and maintain his blog, the earliest his weekly column would return would be "several weeks after my death.
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