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NEWS
October 17, 1997
Maryland Symphony Orchestra Maestro Barry Tuckwell will be the grand marshal of this year's Mummers' Parade, according to the Alsatia Club, which sponsors the annual event. Tuckwell will leave the symphony at the end of this season, the symphony's 16th. He has served as the orchestra's music director since he co-founded the symphony in 1982. A world-renowned French horn player, Tuckwell gave his final performance Jan. 25, 1997, in Baltimore. Tuckwell began studying French horn at the age of 13 and two years later gave his first professional engagement as third horn with the Melbourne Symphony Orchestra, of Australia, according to the Alsatia Club.
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NEWS
By MARLO BARNHART | July 1, 2007
Editor's note: Each Sunday, The Herald-Mail publishes "A Life Remembered. " This continuing series takes a look back - through the eyes of family, friends, co-workers and others - at a member of the community who died recently. Today's "A Life Remembered" is about Walter A. Lawson, who died June 13 at the age of 84. His obituary appeared in the June 20 editions of The Morning Herald and The Daily Mail. In the revered Prokofiev composition "Peter and the Wolf," the French horn provides the musical theme for the wolf, symbolically mimicking the deep and sinister nature of the beast.
NEWS
November 18, 1996
By ELLEN LYON Staff Writer Maestro Barry Tuckwell played the instrument he loves with the symphony orchestra he founded and directs in its historic home, the Maryland Theatre, for the last time Sunday. Tuckwell, a master of the French horn, is capping an extraordinary 50-year performance career with a farewell tour that began in June in Dallas, Texas, and has included concerts in Dublin, Switzerland, London, Helsinki and, this past weekend, in Hagerstown with the Maryland Symphony Orchestra.
NEWS
January 28, 1998
Small fire threatens Roundhouse BRENDAN KIRBY Staff Writer Firefighters Tuesday put out a small blaze amid blankets and other items inside Hagerstown's Roundhouse, officials said. Hagerstown Fire Department Battalion Chief Ron Horn said the fire started at about 4:30 p.m. in a little room inside the structure. Firefighters brought the fire under control within minutes and had it out within about half an hour. "There wasn't that much to it," Horn said. "It looks like someone made a fire to keep warm.
NEWS
by KATE COLEMAN | June 24, 2004
katec@herald-mail.com Ernie Wetterer of Sharpsburg got fascinated with the trumpet when his son was learning in 1970. Wetterer took lessons for six months before stopping. He started to play again in 1997, when the New Horizons Band program - designed for people older than 50 - was offered for the first time at what was then Hagerstown Junior College. The local program was started by Kate Levy, who had come from Iowa City, Iowa, where she was brass instructor for Iowa City New Horizons Band - one of the four pilot programs in the country patterned after the Rochester, N.Y., program at Eastman School of Music.
NEWS
by BRIAN SHAPPELL | November 14, 2003
shappell@herald-mail.com Emergency responders gathered Thursday to review their performance at an October Environmental Protection Agency emergency drill and came to two conclusions: It was a great learning experience, and they need more training with new gear. Hagerstown Deputy Fire Chief Ron Horn and Hagerstown Battalion Chief Kyd Dieterick said the drill was a good learning experience for all the responders involved. Horn said EPA officials sent him reaction from the Oct. 20 training session, the first over three days, at the Long Meadow Shopping Center.
NEWS
January 21, 2002
Symphony's Own takes center stage at Maryland Theatre By KEVIN CLAPP kevinc@herald-mail.com Mimicking the title of the opening number, the Maryland Symphony Orchestra celebrated the talents of its own performers Sunday afternoon at The Maryland Theatre. The Symphony's Own, an annual MasterWorks series performance that takes symphony members out from the shadows of guest soloists, was a big hit with the full theater, making up for a Saturday night that was sparse because of the wintry weather.
NEWS
February 27, 1997
By GUY FLETCHER Staff Writer ANNAPOLIS - Maryland Gov. Parris N. Glendening doesn't pretend to be a student of classical music, but he knows what he likes. "Whenever I go to the orchestra, one of the things I really like is the French horn," Glendening said. On Thursday, Glendening met the person some consider to be the world's greatest French horn player when Barry Tuckwell, conductor of Hagerstown's Maryland Symphony Orchestra, visited. "I'm so honored to meet you. I have heard so much about you," Glendening told Tuckwell.
NEWS
by MARLO BARNHART | September 22, 2003
marlob@herald-mail.com Bill Yount isn't ashamed to admit he's a fool for Christ. In fact, he's proud of it. "If someone had told me five years ago I would be traveling full time around the country and to Israel ministering and blowing a crooked ram's horn, I would have said they were crazy - that sounds too foolish," Yount said. But Yount said the Bible is filled with examples of people doing seemingly foolish things to show their devotion to God. The horn in question is called a shofar and its significance grows as the Jewish holy days of Rosh Hashana and Yom Kippur approach.
NEWS
February 17, 1999
By KATE COLEMAN / Staff Writer Edward Cumming says he's been looking forward to this weekend's Maryland Symphony Orchestra concerts for a long time. The final of the four candidates for the MSO's music director position, Cumming says he was moved by community's affection for the orchestra. [cont. from lifestyle ] He's also looking forward to Prelude, the discussion that begins an hour before the Saturday and Sunday performances. "I love doing that sort of thing," he says.
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