Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: HeraldMail HomeCollectionsHistory Lesson
IN THE NEWS

History Lesson

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
By HEATHER KEELS | heather.keels@herald-mail.com | December 10, 2010
Dressed in a star-spangled blue coat and red and white striped pants, the Santa Claus who greeted visitors at Antietam National Battlefield Friday might have seemed oddly out of uniform. Actually, he told his audience, the outfit was one of many Santa has been depicted wearing over the years. In the Jan. 3, 1863 edition of Harper’s Weekly, an illustration by Thomas Nast showed Santa decked out in stars and stripes, distributing gifts to children and Civil War soldiers.
OPINION
By ART CALLAHAM | December 17, 2011
While on vacation in Texas a couple of weeks ago, I watched a news documentary on "gerrymandering" and I learned a great deal. Considering what is going on with the redistricting of Maryland's 6th Congressional District, I thought a column about gerrymandering was in order. The following is a little history, according to research I did online. The word gerrymander (originally written Gerry-mander) was used for the first time in the Boston Gazette on March 26, 1812. The word was created in reaction to a redrawing of Massachusetts' state senate election districts under then-Gov.
NEWS
By BONNIE H. BRECHBILL | October 30, 2005
bonnieb@herald-mail.com CHAMBERSBURG, PA. - Halloween combined with history Saturday as children competed in a historical character costume contest at the Heritage Center on Chambersburg's Memorial Square. Trick-or-Treat on Main Street organizers suggested that contestants dress as a historic personality from Franklin County's past or fashion a costume based on one of the center's five themes - Frontier, Architecture, the Civil War, Underground Railroad or Transportation.
NEWS
by TIFFANY ARNOLD | May 17, 2007
BIG POOL - The French and Indian War will be revisited at Fort Frederick State Park this weekend. The park is hosting a French and Indian War muster on Saturday and Sunday. Demonstrators will portray French and British soldiers, as well as civilian settlers and American Indians, park historian Steve Robertson said. The event, a somewhat annual tradition for about three decades, typically draws 100 participants and between 1,000 to 2,000 spectators, Robertson said. A quick history lesson: Fort Frederick exists because of the French and Indian War (1754-63)
NEWS
by TIFFANY ARNOLD | April 25, 2006
SHARPSBURG Two rows away from where three seventh-grade girls were hunched, scrubbing a marble tombstone at Antietam National Cemetery, was a curious grave with the name of Henry Struble on it. But Henry Struble's body isn't buried there, the girls explained as they pointed to the tombstone. When the body was buried, military officials believed the man was Henry Struble because that was the name etched on his canteen. The dead man was a Union soldier who had fought in the Battle of South Mountain in 1862, days before the Battle of Antietam.
NEWS
September 13, 1997
As a re-enactment, it was horrifyingly realistic. Ninety minutes of white-smoke, ear-smacking fury unleashed by thousands of men, joined to commemorate the 135th anniversary of the Battle of Antietam with blue or gray wool and black powder. In what can only be described as the world's noisiest history lesson, Antietam's tragic truths were pounded home. First, the blue seemed to have such power in numbers I began to think there was no way they could even pretend to lose.
NEWS
January 1, 2009
Dance to the beat of your own drummer Feel the beat at a community drum circle, with interfaith dancing Sunday that promotes peace. Drumming starts at 6:30 p.m., dancing is at 7:30. Shake it like a Polaroid picture Photographer Deborah Winram uses the instant film to document the closing of a Frederick, Md., hardware store in exhibit "nexttoknowing," which opens Saturday at The Artists' Gallery. Wizards v. Celtics Can the Wizards beat the Celtics in Boston?
ENTERTAINMENT
February 1, 2012
1. Young artists at work Students from Franklin, Adams, Cumberland and Fulton counties in Pennsylvania and Washington County, Md., will display their artwork. The artwork was judged by the college art faculty. Reception from 5 to 7 p.m. Thursday, Feb 9. Exhibit continues through Friday, March 16. Wilson College's Bogigian Gallery, second floor of Lortz Hall, 1015 Philadelphia Ave., Chambersburg, Pa. Call 717-264-4141, ext. 3305, or email philip.lindsey@wilson.edu . 2. Loads of laughs Make Me Laugh Comedy Tour will be Friday, Feb. 10, at Next Dimensions, 132 Old National Pike, south of Funkstown.  Lonnie Davis and Chad Beadle, pictured, will headline; also featuring Chris Ables, KD the comedian and Marcell.
NEWS
November 23, 2006
It has been more than 40 years since the assassination of President John F. Kennedy on Nov. 22, 1963. Americans who lived through the terrorist attacks of Sept. 11, 2001 will never forget where they were when they first heard that terrible news. So it is for those who were living when JFK died. For many who did not experience his time in office - and for some who did - what they remember is the tabloid-style gossip about his dalliances with women to whom he was not married.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By JULIE E. GREENE | julieg@herald-mail.com | May 6, 2013
"Gods and Generals" author Jeff Shaara announced Monday he would match up to $5,000 in contributions to help fund a documentary about the Antietam National Battlefield Memorial Illumination. Former Hagerstown resident Michael Wicklein is producing a feature-length documentary about the annual December illumination and the stories behind the luminarias. During the annual December event, volunteers place 23,000 luminarias at Antietam National Battlefield to represent the casualties from the bloodiest single-day battle on American soil.
Advertisement
ENTERTAINMENT
July 9, 2012
1.  Painted by the Guild "Form, Function and Fantasy," an art show and sale by Potomac River Artists Guild, will open Friday, July 13 at War Memorial Building, corner of German and Princess streets, downtown Shepherdstown, W.Va.  Meet the artists reception, 3 to 5 p.m. Saturday, July 14. Exhibit continues through Sunday, July 15. Hours are 11 a.m. to 8 p.m. Friday; 9 a.m. to 8 p.m. Saturday; 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Sunday. Free admission. Go to www.potomacriverartistsguild.org . 2. Mini 'Thoroughly Modern Millie' "Thoroughly Modern Millie Jr. " will be presented at 7 p.m. Friday, July 13, and Saturday, July 14; 2 p.m. Sunday, July 15. Musselman High School auditorium, 126 Excellence Way, Inwood, W.Va.
NEWS
Lisa Prejean | March 22, 2012
My first-born turned 17 yesterday. It is not easy raising teenagers today. They have so many choices academically, socially, philosophically, globally. Their list of options is mind-boggling. Opportunities abound. Yet there are so many situations that could hinder or halt that progress indefinitely. As a parent, it can be an apprehensive road. Have I prepared my child well enough? Will he make the right decisions? Will he be safe? Will he keep his integrity in a world full of pressure to choose otherwise?
OPINION
By ART CALLAHAM | December 17, 2011
While on vacation in Texas a couple of weeks ago, I watched a news documentary on "gerrymandering" and I learned a great deal. Considering what is going on with the redistricting of Maryland's 6th Congressional District, I thought a column about gerrymandering was in order. The following is a little history, according to research I did online. The word gerrymander (originally written Gerry-mander) was used for the first time in the Boston Gazette on March 26, 1812. The word was created in reaction to a redrawing of Massachusetts' state senate election districts under then-Gov.
NEWS
By JENNIFER FITCH | waynesboro@herald-mail.com | December 4, 2011
A model train display opened to the public for the first time this weekend provided not only “O”-gauge trains navigating various scenes, but lessons about Franklin County's past. In his layout, retired history teacher Charlie Kauffman incorporated scenes like the Quincy Engine Co., Good Lumber Co. and Mont Alto Ironworks. He wrote descriptions about each scene for visitors touring a building on his property dedicated to the display. Kauffman opened the layout, which took him three years to create, to the public for the first time Sunday.
LIFESTYLE
By MARIE GILBERT | marieg@herald-mail.com | October 26, 2011
Editor's Note: Alsatia Club representatives and Hagerstown officials are scheduled to meet Saturday morning to decide whether the Mummers Parade will be held in the evening despite a forecasted snowstorm. Although the weather has a will of its own and the choicest spots might go to those who stake claims early, thousands of people are expected to line the streets of Hagerstown Saturday night to enjoy the 87th annual Alsatia Mummers Parade. It's an autumn event that's rich in tradition, with marching bands, floats and baton-twirling majorettes.
LIFESTYLE
Kate Coleman | February 4, 2011
Remember this? “Sticks and stones will break my bones, but names will never hurt me.” That was something my mother would say whenever one of her three daughters would tattle that one of the other two — or a classmate — had called her a bad name. It might have been something as nasty as “Baby” or “Smarty-pants” in my what-now-seems-incredibly civil New Jersey childhood. Mom’s message was “Don’t sweat the small stuff” — although I don’t think the phrase had yet been coined, and she most likely would have considered “sweat” too coarse.
NEWS
By HEATHER KEELS | heather.keels@herald-mail.com | December 10, 2010
Dressed in a star-spangled blue coat and red and white striped pants, the Santa Claus who greeted visitors at Antietam National Battlefield Friday might have seemed oddly out of uniform. Actually, he told his audience, the outfit was one of many Santa has been depicted wearing over the years. In the Jan. 3, 1863 edition of Harper’s Weekly, an illustration by Thomas Nast showed Santa decked out in stars and stripes, distributing gifts to children and Civil War soldiers.
NEWS
By TIFFANY ARNOLD | August 30, 2009
o Clues and answers from the 13th annual Herald-Mail Landmarks contest SHARPSBURG -- Nine-year-old Ben Mongan enjoyed looking for the clues at Antietam National Battlefield so much, he asked his mother Kristie Mongan to take him back. "We got the CD and did the driving tour again the next day," said his mother, Kristie. In our eyes, all 117 entrants were winners of this year's Landmarks contest, but that would cost the paper $35,100. So there can only be one. This year's winner is Sharpsburg resident Janet Williams, who won the first prize, $300.
The Herald-Mail Articles
|