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Historical Marker

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NEWS
by DON AINES | January 14, 2004
chambersburg@herald-mail.com CHAMBERSBURG, Pa. - Two centuries after Meriwether Lewis and William Clark set out from St. Louis, Mo., to explore the Louisiana Purchase, a key member and chronicler of the Corps of Discovery has been honored with a historical marker at his birthplace. Patrick Gass rowed, rode and walked across the continent from 1803 to 1806 and lived long enough to see its coasts united by the Transcontinental Railroad. His journal was published in 1807, before the official account by the expedition's co-leaders.
NEWS
BY STACEY DANZUSO | April 30, 2002
chambersburg@herald-mail.com CHAMBERSBURG, Pa. - After four years of research and repair, a historical marker will be placed at the Old Jewish Cemetery of Chambersburg next month. "It's on display in my living room right now," said James Wolfson, who led the effort to restore the pre-Civil War cemetery and apply for the historical marker from the Pennsylvania Historical and Museum Commission. The cemetery, consecrated in 1844, is the last resting place for a society of Orthodox Jews who emigrated from Germany during the 19th century.
NEWS
BY STACEY DANZUSO | May 13, 2002
chambersburg@herald-mail.com CHAMBERSBURG, Pa. - It took four years and three applications, but James Wolfson said the effort was worth it Sunday at the unveiling of the state historical marker for the Old Jewish Cemetery. "We should all be greatly honored. The Old Jewish Cemetery is only the third cemetery in the Commonwealth to get a state historical marker and only the third Jewish cemetery in the country," said Wolfson, who led the effort to restore the cemetery and obtain the marker.
NEWS
by STACEY DANZUSO | January 13, 2003
chambersburg@herald-mail.com The dedication of a historical marker highlighting Franklin County's role in the Civil War-era Underground Railroad will be the inaugural event for a new organization devoted to promoting the area's rich black history. Wednesday's ceremony has a dual purpose: To introduce the Waters Institute for African-American History Inc. to the community and to unveil the historical marker that will be placed on Memorial Square in Chambersburg, said the Rev. Bill Harter, a board member.
NEWS
by RICHARD BELISLE | May 14, 2003
waynesboro@herald-mail.com MONT ALTO, Pa. - A historical marker depicting the 100th anniversary of Penn State University's Mont Alto campus was unveiled Tuesday near the bridge over the East Branch of Antietam Creek that leads into the campus. A crowd of nearly 100 gathered for the event. The school opened in 1903 as Pennsylvania's forestry school, the first in the state and the third in the country. That was the year the Wright Brothers first flew, Teddy Roosevelt opened the first national park and the first Harley-Davidson motorcycles were built, said David Gnage, CEO at Mont Alto.
NEWS
by STACEY DANZUSO | January 16, 2003
chambersburg@herald-mail.com CHAMBERSBURG - Franklin County's role as a crossroads in the Underground Railroad was honored Wednesday with the dedication of a historical marker in downtown Chambersburg. "Today, we celebrate Pennsylvania as the gateway of freedom. We celebrate ourselves that we haven't given up," on the fight for civil rights, said Karen James, an official with the Pennsylvania Historical and Museum Commission. More than 300 people gathered inside Central Presbyterian Church and later on Memorial Square for the unveiling of the marker, which recounts Franklin County's participation in the Underground Railroad as a stop in escaped slaves' flights north.
NEWS
By DAVE McMILLION | June 30, 2009
HAGERSTOWN -- Harpers Ferry, W.Va., is most commonly linked to John Brown's October 1859 raid on a federal arsenal during his failed attempt to arm an uprising of slaves. But Hagerstown played a part in the string of events, too, and that moment in history was celebrated Tuesday afternoon during an unveiling of a historical marker downtown. From Oct. 16 to 18, 1859, Brown and others took possession of an armory in Harpers Ferry. The raid drew militia companies and federal troops from Maryland, Virginia and other areas.
NEWS
September 9, 2012
A follow-up: In September 2011, The Herald-Mail printed an inquiry from Eldon Hawbaker of Hagerstown, who wrote that a historical marker along U.S. 40, about a mile west of Conococheague Creek, was rusty, difficult to read and in danger of falling down. The marker bore the name “State Roads Commission,” the former name of the Maryland State Highway Administration. At the time, SHA spokeswoman Kellie Boulware said SHA crews were told about it, and were figuring out how to refurbish or replace it. “A temporary sign will be installed on the pole until work is complete, which should be before the end of the year,” Boulware wrote in an email at the time.
NEWS
by DON AINES | October 6, 2003
chambersburg@herald-mail.com CHAMBERSBURG, Pa. - John Brown's body lies a-mouldering in the grave, but the former boarding house where he planned the Harpers Ferry, W.Va., raid is in good repair, thanks to the Kittochtinny Historical Society and the Boonsboro man who provided it with the money to purchase the property. The society on Sunday honored Wilbur R. McElroy and family as benefactors of the John Brown House at a reception attended by about 80 people at King Street United Brethren Church.
NEWS
December 3, 2002
The other re-enactors To the editor: As a member of a re-enactment group that portrays the time period of the French and Indian War and a rifle company of the early years of the Revolutionary War, it bothers me to see how little attention is paid to that era. History in our area did not begin with General Lee's invasion of the North in 1862. George Washington, Ben Franklin, Gen. Edward Braddock and Thomas Cresap walked the streets of Frederick. Hessian prisoners of war built a stone barrack that still stands on the property of the Maryland School for the Deaf.
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NEWS
September 9, 2012
A follow-up: In September 2011, The Herald-Mail printed an inquiry from Eldon Hawbaker of Hagerstown, who wrote that a historical marker along U.S. 40, about a mile west of Conococheague Creek, was rusty, difficult to read and in danger of falling down. The marker bore the name “State Roads Commission,” the former name of the Maryland State Highway Administration. At the time, SHA spokeswoman Kellie Boulware said SHA crews were told about it, and were figuring out how to refurbish or replace it. “A temporary sign will be installed on the pole until work is complete, which should be before the end of the year,” Boulware wrote in an email at the time.
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NEWS
By DON AINES | dona@herald-mail.com | June 10, 2011
There are more than 2,300 roadside historical markers in the database of the Pennsylvania Historical and Museum Commission. But about 200 of them are listed as missing, including one that disappeared recently in Montgomery Township. The "Burning of Chambersburg" sign turned up missing from its spot at the intersection of Blairs Valley and Hunter Roads sometime in the past two weeks, said Karen Galle, coordinator of the Pennsylvania Historic and Museum Commission's Historic Marker Program.
NEWS
By DAVE McMILLION | June 30, 2009
HAGERSTOWN -- Harpers Ferry, W.Va., is most commonly linked to John Brown's October 1859 raid on a federal arsenal during his failed attempt to arm an uprising of slaves. But Hagerstown played a part in the string of events, too, and that moment in history was celebrated Tuesday afternoon during an unveiling of a historical marker downtown. From Oct. 16 to 18, 1859, Brown and others took possession of an armory in Harpers Ferry. The raid drew militia companies and federal troops from Maryland, Virginia and other areas.
NEWS
by DON AINES | January 14, 2004
chambersburg@herald-mail.com CHAMBERSBURG, Pa. - Two centuries after Meriwether Lewis and William Clark set out from St. Louis, Mo., to explore the Louisiana Purchase, a key member and chronicler of the Corps of Discovery has been honored with a historical marker at his birthplace. Patrick Gass rowed, rode and walked across the continent from 1803 to 1806 and lived long enough to see its coasts united by the Transcontinental Railroad. His journal was published in 1807, before the official account by the expedition's co-leaders.
NEWS
by DON AINES | October 6, 2003
chambersburg@herald-mail.com CHAMBERSBURG, Pa. - John Brown's body lies a-mouldering in the grave, but the former boarding house where he planned the Harpers Ferry, W.Va., raid is in good repair, thanks to the Kittochtinny Historical Society and the Boonsboro man who provided it with the money to purchase the property. The society on Sunday honored Wilbur R. McElroy and family as benefactors of the John Brown House at a reception attended by about 80 people at King Street United Brethren Church.
NEWS
by RICHARD BELISLE | May 14, 2003
waynesboro@herald-mail.com MONT ALTO, Pa. - A historical marker depicting the 100th anniversary of Penn State University's Mont Alto campus was unveiled Tuesday near the bridge over the East Branch of Antietam Creek that leads into the campus. A crowd of nearly 100 gathered for the event. The school opened in 1903 as Pennsylvania's forestry school, the first in the state and the third in the country. That was the year the Wright Brothers first flew, Teddy Roosevelt opened the first national park and the first Harley-Davidson motorcycles were built, said David Gnage, CEO at Mont Alto.
NEWS
by STACEY DANZUSO | January 16, 2003
chambersburg@herald-mail.com CHAMBERSBURG - Franklin County's role as a crossroads in the Underground Railroad was honored Wednesday with the dedication of a historical marker in downtown Chambersburg. "Today, we celebrate Pennsylvania as the gateway of freedom. We celebrate ourselves that we haven't given up," on the fight for civil rights, said Karen James, an official with the Pennsylvania Historical and Museum Commission. More than 300 people gathered inside Central Presbyterian Church and later on Memorial Square for the unveiling of the marker, which recounts Franklin County's participation in the Underground Railroad as a stop in escaped slaves' flights north.
NEWS
by STACEY DANZUSO | January 13, 2003
chambersburg@herald-mail.com The dedication of a historical marker highlighting Franklin County's role in the Civil War-era Underground Railroad will be the inaugural event for a new organization devoted to promoting the area's rich black history. Wednesday's ceremony has a dual purpose: To introduce the Waters Institute for African-American History Inc. to the community and to unveil the historical marker that will be placed on Memorial Square in Chambersburg, said the Rev. Bill Harter, a board member.
NEWS
December 3, 2002
The other re-enactors To the editor: As a member of a re-enactment group that portrays the time period of the French and Indian War and a rifle company of the early years of the Revolutionary War, it bothers me to see how little attention is paid to that era. History in our area did not begin with General Lee's invasion of the North in 1862. George Washington, Ben Franklin, Gen. Edward Braddock and Thomas Cresap walked the streets of Frederick. Hessian prisoners of war built a stone barrack that still stands on the property of the Maryland School for the Deaf.
NEWS
by ANDREA ROWLAND | September 16, 2002
andrear@herald-mail.com BURKITTSVILLE, Md. - A Civil War educational group on Saturday dedicated interpretive signs that members hope will increase public awareness about a key battle fought on South Mountain near Burkittsville. Exactly 140 years after Confederate and Union troops clashed at Crampton's Gap on Sept. 14, 1862, members of the Virginia-based Blue and Gray Education Society met at the battlefield site in South Mountain State Park to dedicate 17 color-illustrated and narrative signs that commemorate the battle.
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