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Hillary Clinton

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NEWS
By TIM ROWLAND | May 15, 2008
Does anyone realize how very, very close America came to having West Virginia decide the next president of the United States? Really, had Hillary picked up a few more delegates here or there in previous primaries, the West Virginia vote would have been for all the marbles. How great would that have been? After months of campaigning, dozens of elections and millions of dollars spent, the next leader of the free world could have been decided by a guy with a sink on his front porch.
NEWS
By DAVE McMILLION | May 8, 2008
Click here to view the slideshow. SHEPHERDSTOWN, W.Va. -- Before a charged and sometimes raucous crowd of about 350 people at Shepherd University, Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Rodham Clinton on Wednesday worked to keep up the energy in her battle with Barack Obama, detailing her agenda for a better economy, renewable energy and better health care and education options. "I'm so happy to be here in West Virginia and excited about the next week as we campaign here in this beautiful state about our country's future," Clinton told the Shepherd audience.
NEWS
April 15, 2008
CHAMBERSBURG, Pa. As part of her three-day "Your Future. It's Bright" bus tour through Pennsylvania, which kicked off in the state today, Chelsea Clinton will make a campaign stop on behalf of her mother, presidential candidate Hillary Clinton, at Wilson College today. The appearance, which is free and open to the public, will be held on the Wilson campus main green. Several preliminary speakers will take the stage at approximately 4:30 p.m. Chelsea Clinton is expected to speak around 5 p.m., followed by a question-and-answer session.
NEWS
April 25, 2008
(Editor's note: On April 19, The Herald-Mail printed Jonathan Burrs' column about Hillary Clinton, in which he defined her as a "bamboozling politician. " This drew many responses from all over the U.S. Not all signed their names, but letters from some who did appear below.) · If Sen. Barack Obama's candidacy is unable to withstand the mild attacks from his own party, can we expect him to win in the general election? I think not. Please remember, only 130 votes separate these two candidates.
NEWS
By BETHANY FERGUSON / Pulse Correspondent | December 4, 2007
Which of the presidential candidates do you like, and why? In less than a year from now, the race will be over. The race for our country's leader, the commander in chief, the decider. Although some teens aren't old enough to vote yet, they still have their favorite candidates. Hillary Clinton and Barack Obama were the winners in my survey of 16 local teens. For the most part, girls preferred Democratic candidate Hillary Clinton. "Hillary Clinton is definitely my pick for this year's election," said Alexi Fulton, a 17-year-old attending Hagerstown Community College.
NEWS
September 6, 2007
Clinton critic uses the rhetoric he says he disdains To the editor: In a Sept. 1 letter by Jonathan Burrs, he stated that, in his opinion, Hillary Clinton was "simply not qualified" to be the next president, based on her inability to define specific strategies on issues and her political rhetoric. Burrs also stated that his opinion is based on facts, not fiction, such as many Clinton "cronies" would use to define her candidacy. Burrs missed the point of my previous response to his letter saying that all Democrats seeking the presidency were losers!
NEWS
By HEATHER KEELS | February 13, 2008
Washington County voters bucked state trends in the presidential primary races, selecting Hillary Clinton over Barack Obama and landing somewhere on the fence between Mike Huckabee and John McCain. With more than half of Maryland's precincts reporting, Obama led Clinton in the Democratic race by more than 24 percent statewide, but in Washington County, Clinton was chosen by a margin of more than 15 percent. In Washington County, the race between McCain and Huckabee was too close to call before absentee ballots are counted, with McCain leading by a margin of less than 2 percent.
NEWS
By MARIE GILBERT | September 27, 2008
HAGERSTOWN -- The T-shirts, buttons and banners tell of their allegiance. They are supporters of Barack Obama. Some previously had worked for Hillary Clinton, others had been undecided. But now, they firmly are in the Illinois senator's corner. They are Women for Obama -- a grass-roots effort to connect women with information about the Democratic presidential candidate and his position on issues. "We want people to learn as much as they can about Barack Obama," said Lucretia Jefferson, chairwoman of the local organization.
NEWS
By MARIE GILBERT | September 28, 2008
The T-shirts, buttons and banners tell of their allegiance. They are supporters of Barack Obama. Some previously had worked for Hillary Clinton, others had been undecided. But now, they firmly are in the Illinois senator's corner. They are Women for Obama - a grass-roots effort to connect women with information about the Democratic presidential candidate and his position on issues. "We want people to learn as much as they can about Barack Obama," said Lucretia Jefferson, chairwoman of the local organization.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
August 25, 2010
"To the caller concerned about the campaign posters in the cemetery: Well, the dead have been known to vote now and then. " - Knoxville, Md. "To the caller who won't patronize Washington County businesses due to a Republican sign: Further reinforces my thoughts that Democrats and/or liberals cannot have a logical conversation on matters of importance, and can only attack people with views which are different from their own....
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NEWS
By MARIE GILBERT | September 28, 2008
The T-shirts, buttons and banners tell of their allegiance. They are supporters of Barack Obama. Some previously had worked for Hillary Clinton, others had been undecided. But now, they firmly are in the Illinois senator's corner. They are Women for Obama - a grass-roots effort to connect women with information about the Democratic presidential candidate and his position on issues. "We want people to learn as much as they can about Barack Obama," said Lucretia Jefferson, chairwoman of the local organization.
NEWS
By MARIE GILBERT | September 27, 2008
HAGERSTOWN -- The T-shirts, buttons and banners tell of their allegiance. They are supporters of Barack Obama. Some previously had worked for Hillary Clinton, others had been undecided. But now, they firmly are in the Illinois senator's corner. They are Women for Obama -- a grass-roots effort to connect women with information about the Democratic presidential candidate and his position on issues. "We want people to learn as much as they can about Barack Obama," said Lucretia Jefferson, chairwoman of the local organization.
NEWS
By TIM ROWLAND | May 15, 2008
Does anyone realize how very, very close America came to having West Virginia decide the next president of the United States? Really, had Hillary picked up a few more delegates here or there in previous primaries, the West Virginia vote would have been for all the marbles. How great would that have been? After months of campaigning, dozens of elections and millions of dollars spent, the next leader of the free world could have been decided by a guy with a sink on his front porch.
NEWS
By ERIN JULIUS | May 8, 2008
SHEPHERDSTOWN, W.Va. -- Hillary Clinton drew a long round of applause Wednesday when she told a crowd gathered at Shepherd University that she was worried about gas prices. "Me, too," said one woman standing only a few yards from Clinton. Nicole Boggs, 22, said she liked everything Clinton said during the campaign stop, but she wasn't sure whether Clinton would actually deliver on her promises. So the Shepherd University student had a question for the Democratic presidential candidate as Clinton made her way around the crowd, shaking hands and signing autographs.
NEWS
By DAVE McMILLION | May 8, 2008
Click here to view the slideshow. SHEPHERDSTOWN, W.Va. -- Before a charged and sometimes raucous crowd of about 350 people at Shepherd University, Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Rodham Clinton on Wednesday worked to keep up the energy in her battle with Barack Obama, detailing her agenda for a better economy, renewable energy and better health care and education options. "I'm so happy to be here in West Virginia and excited about the next week as we campaign here in this beautiful state about our country's future," Clinton told the Shepherd audience.
NEWS
April 26, 2008
Burrs' column on Hillary draws many responses (Editor's note: On April 19, The Herald-Mail printed Jonathan Burrs' column about Hillary Clinton, in which he defined her as a "bamboozling politician. " This drew many responses from all over the U.S. Not all signed their names, but letters from some who did appear below.) If Sen. Barack Obama's candidacy is unable to withstand the mild attacks from his own party, can we expect him to win in the general election? I think not. Please remember, only 130 votes separate these two candidates.
NEWS
By MATTHEW UMSTEAD | April 26, 2008
MARTINSBURG, W.VA. - Gov. Joe Manchin said Friday that he will not endorse either Hillary Clinton or Barack Obama to be the Democratic Party's presidential nominee before West Virginia's primary election, which is less than three weeks away. "I want an open primary," Manchin said during a visit to the Eastern Panhandle that included appearances in Berkeley and Jefferson counties. "I want everyone to feel welcome. I've been encouraging, recruiting people to run for offices, and I think it would be wrong for the so-called head of the (state)
NEWS
April 25, 2008
(Editor's note: On April 19, The Herald-Mail printed Jonathan Burrs' column about Hillary Clinton, in which he defined her as a "bamboozling politician. " This drew many responses from all over the U.S. Not all signed their names, but letters from some who did appear below.) · If Sen. Barack Obama's candidacy is unable to withstand the mild attacks from his own party, can we expect him to win in the general election? I think not. Please remember, only 130 votes separate these two candidates.
NEWS
By DON AINES | April 16, 2008
CHAMBERSBURG, Pa. -- Former first daughter Chelsea Clinton said her stop Tuesday at Wilson College was the 109th campus she has visited on the campaign trail in support of her mother's bid for the White House. The outcome of next Tuesday's Pennsylvania primary could mean the difference between U.S. Sen. Hillary Rodham Clinton moving on to the next primaries in North Carolina and Indiana, or her opponent, U.S. Sen. Barack Obama, putting the nomination out of reach. With some celebrities in the entourage, Chelsea Clinton rolled onto campus in an RV for an outdoor rally that drew an audience of several hundred people.
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