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NEWS
by TARA REILLY | January 19, 2006
tarar@herald-mail.com WASHINGTON COUNTY - The month of March tends to be when things happen for longtime Washington County Highway Director Ted Wolford. He was born on March 9, 1937. He began working for the county on March 10, 1969, and he married his wife, Patricia, on March 5, 1981. March 1 of this year will mark another notable event for Wolford: He will be spending his first day as a retiree, after nearly 37 years as a county employee. Wolford, 68, said Wednesday by phone he is retiring at the end of February.
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NEWS
by TARA REILLY | November 16, 2005
Two Washington County Commissioners and a number of county employees received flu shots Tuesday. Human Resources Director Dee Hawbaker said 310 to 320 employees signed up for the shots, but how many actually received them wasn't available as of late Tuesday afternoon. Commissioners James F. Kercheval and John C. Munson received shots during a quick break from a commissioners meeting Tuesday. Hawbaker said the shots were available at the Highway Department, County Administration Building and the Department of Water Quality.
NEWS
By TARA REILLY | October 26, 2005
tarar@herald-mail.com Washington County's public works director on Tuesday asked that a management position in the Highway Department be restored, but the County Commissioners didn't show much interest. Public Works Director Gary Rohrer proposed that the Highway Department deputy director post, which has been vacant for the last five years, be filled at an annual salary of $60,000. He said the position has been vacant because of funding constraints. According to a written statement from Rohrer to the commissioners, the department is now in a "strong financial position" to support the position.
NEWS
by TARA REILLY | August 11, 2004
13 employees complete courses Thirteen Washington County employees completed a series of management courses offered by the Washington County Training Office and Hagerstown Community College. The program, Going for the Gold, offers employee development courses in government management and support. It is designed to improve skills, knowledge and abilities, according to county information. The employees who completed the program receive certification in Government Supervisory Management or Office Support Management.
NEWS
by TARA REILLY | April 18, 2003
The State Highway Administration on Monday will begin a $1.1 million project to improve the intersection of U.S. 40 at Md. 63, which is Huyetts Crossroads, Spokesman David Buck said Wednesday. The project includes adding right turn lanes in both directions, resurfacing the road, drainage improvements and new traffic signals. Buck said the project is slated to last 120 days and should be completed by the end of the year. Shoulder and lane closings may occur along U.S. 40 and Md. 63 (Spielman Road)
NEWS
by TARA REILLY | February 26, 2003
tarar@herald-mail.com WASHINGTON COUNTY - Washington County highway officials said Tuesday they have slashed more than $1.1 million from the department's proposed fiscal year 2004 budget to help make up for $2.3 million in state cuts. The budget also takes $700,000 from reserves and $513,532 from county capital improvement money to cover the shortfall. Highway Director Ted Wolford told the Washington County Commissioners that the department's fleet management fund took the brunt of the cuts, with $641,056 being shaved from the account.
NEWS
by TARA REILLY | January 22, 2003
tarar@herald-mail.com The Washington County Commissioners found out Friday they're facing nearly $5 million in state funding cuts under Maryland Gov. Robert Ehrlich's proposed 2004 state budget. County Administrator Rodney Shoop said Tuesday the county would be forced to pare its operating budget if the proposed state cuts stand or are increased. Commissioner John C. Munson said it's likely the county would have to reduce its work force to make up for the state cuts.
NEWS
by DAVE McMILLION | December 18, 2002
charlestown@herald-mail.com CHARLES TOWN - The widening of W.Va. 9 from two to four lanes from Charles Town south to the Virginia state line has been halted until two federal lawsuits challenging the design of that segment of the road have been resolved, officials said Tuesday. The West Virginia Division of Highways has agreed to stop work on the segment of the highway project because of issues raised in the lawsuits about how the new highway would affect the Shenandoah River and Belvedere Farm, a National Historic Register property south of Charles Town.
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