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NEWS
by TARA REILLY | April 18, 2003
The State Highway Administration on Monday will begin a $1.1 million project to improve the intersection of U.S. 40 at Md. 63, which is Huyetts Crossroads, Spokesman David Buck said Wednesday. The project includes adding right turn lanes in both directions, resurfacing the road, drainage improvements and new traffic signals. Buck said the project is slated to last 120 days and should be completed by the end of the year. Shoulder and lane closings may occur along U.S. 40 and Md. 63 (Spielman Road)
NEWS
March 30, 2006
The Washington County Commissioners on Tuesday named Edwin L. Plank as Highway Department director, according to a written statement. Plank, who has worked for the department for 12 years, replaces Ted Wolford. Wolford, who retired in February, was the director for 30 years. County Commissioner John C. Munson said Wednesday that Plank's salary will be $66,500 a year. Plank served as interim director while the commissioners looked for a new director, according to the statement.
NEWS
June 12, 2002
The Washington County Commissioners and Jim Cannon of Hagerstown Community College presented 17 awards of merit and 17 plaques to county employees who completed development courses in government management and support. The series, called "Going for the Gold," is designed to improve employee skills, knowledge and abilities. In order to qualify, candidates had to take 24 course hours in a core curriculum and elective courses. Receiving the Government Supervisory Management certificates were: -- Roy Lescalleet, emergency services.
NEWS
December 9, 2000
In W.Va., road division By DAVE McMILLION / Staff Writer MARTINSBURG, W.Va. - When 45 Morgan County residents showed up at a public meeting a week ago to voice concerns about a new highway in their town, they represented a growing trend. Public opposition to state highway projects in the Eastern Panhandle is becoming commonplace. In Martinsburg, a group calling itself the Berkeley County Citizens Coalition has formed because of concerns over how a proposed Martinsburg bypass may affect the quality of life around town.
NEWS
by TARA REILLY | February 26, 2003
tarar@herald-mail.com WASHINGTON COUNTY - Washington County highway officials said Tuesday they have slashed more than $1.1 million from the department's proposed fiscal year 2004 budget to help make up for $2.3 million in state cuts. The budget also takes $700,000 from reserves and $513,532 from county capital improvement money to cover the shortfall. Highway Director Ted Wolford told the Washington County Commissioners that the department's fleet management fund took the brunt of the cuts, with $641,056 being shaved from the account.
NEWS
by TARA REILLY | November 16, 2005
Two Washington County Commissioners and a number of county employees received flu shots Tuesday. Human Resources Director Dee Hawbaker said 310 to 320 employees signed up for the shots, but how many actually received them wasn't available as of late Tuesday afternoon. Commissioners James F. Kercheval and John C. Munson received shots during a quick break from a commissioners meeting Tuesday. Hawbaker said the shots were available at the Highway Department, County Administration Building and the Department of Water Quality.
NEWS
by TARA REILLY | January 22, 2003
tarar@herald-mail.com The Washington County Commissioners found out Friday they're facing nearly $5 million in state funding cuts under Maryland Gov. Robert Ehrlich's proposed 2004 state budget. County Administrator Rodney Shoop said Tuesday the county would be forced to pare its operating budget if the proposed state cuts stand or are increased. Commissioner John C. Munson said it's likely the county would have to reduce its work force to make up for the state cuts.
BREAKINGNEWS
May 30, 2012
Close to a dozen Washington County roads that had been closed Tuesday from heavy rains that fell over the area had reopened by Wednesday morning, according to a county highway department official. In Hagerstown, Memorial Boulevard between Potomac and Maryland avenues remained closed Wednesday morning due to high water under the railroad overpass, Washington County spokeswoman Sarah Lankford Sprecher said. Dale Poffenberger, street supervisor for the City of Hagerstown, said workers are draining the water from the street.
NEWS
By HEATHER KEELS | August 3, 2010
Complaints about overgrown lawns and other weed ordinance violations in Washington County are coming in at such a high rate that the county is considering hiring a contractor to mow those lots, officials said. Since April 12, the county has had 179 weed ordinance complaints, Permits and Inspections Director Daniel F. DiVito said Tuesday. "This is something that is not going away, especially with the number of foreclosures, the properties that are being owned by banks and companies that are not around here," DiVito said.
NEWS
September 28, 2011
County buys highway safety equipment The Washington County Board of Commissioners Tuesday approved spending $112,996 to buy and install safety equipment for Highway Department workers to use while cleaning large vehicles. The county will buy four, single-post, freestanding fall-arrest systems from Lamco Safety Products Inc. of Hanover, Pa. The systems will be used at each of the Highway Department's four facilities. The systems consist of a harness that hangs from a rail to catch the worker in the event of a fall.
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BREAKINGNEWS
May 30, 2012
Close to a dozen Washington County roads that had been closed Tuesday from heavy rains that fell over the area had reopened by Wednesday morning, according to a county highway department official. In Hagerstown, Memorial Boulevard between Potomac and Maryland avenues remained closed Wednesday morning due to high water under the railroad overpass, Washington County spokeswoman Sarah Lankford Sprecher said. Dale Poffenberger, street supervisor for the City of Hagerstown, said workers are draining the water from the street.
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NEWS
December 4, 2011
The problem: Near the intersection of Air View Road and Pennsylvania Avenue, there is a large ditch off the south side of Air View Road that is not protected by a guardrail, a reader said in an email. “It is a very large drop-off and probably should have a guardrail,” the reader wrote. “There appear to be guardrails in spots of lesser drop-offs.” The only barrier between motorists and the drop - which appears to be as much as 20 feet - are a few poles with reflective lights.
NEWS
September 28, 2011
County buys highway safety equipment The Washington County Board of Commissioners Tuesday approved spending $112,996 to buy and install safety equipment for Highway Department workers to use while cleaning large vehicles. The county will buy four, single-post, freestanding fall-arrest systems from Lamco Safety Products Inc. of Hanover, Pa. The systems will be used at each of the Highway Department's four facilities. The systems consist of a harness that hangs from a rail to catch the worker in the event of a fall.
NEWS
By HEATHER KEELS | August 3, 2010
Complaints about overgrown lawns and other weed ordinance violations in Washington County are coming in at such a high rate that the county is considering hiring a contractor to mow those lots, officials said. Since April 12, the county has had 179 weed ordinance complaints, Permits and Inspections Director Daniel F. DiVito said Tuesday. "This is something that is not going away, especially with the number of foreclosures, the properties that are being owned by banks and companies that are not around here," DiVito said.
NEWS
By TIM ROWLAND | July 8, 2008
Never can I recall a news cycle where the headlines have been so dedicated to the subject of road kill. At least not since the West Virginia legislature legalized the consumption of it. Remember when we laughed at that one? Well, look who's laughing now. West Virginia's grill2grill approach to flattened woodchucks might have seemed unappealing at the time, but give the state credit for dealing with a problem before it became a crisis. Which it has in Maryland, where critter corpses are piling up along the roadside faster than at Bloody Lane.
NEWS
April 2, 2008
A Maryland Correctional Training Center inmate who drove off from a work detail in July had his case forwarded to Washington County Circuit Court on Tuesday. Raymous Little, 44, escaped from a Washington County Roads Department shop on National Pike in a Chevrolet truck that was parked in the shop's lot, according to police. Little, who was serving an 18-month sentence for theft, had family in the Baltimore area and was found by Baltimore County Police. He faces charges of first-degree escape, the unlawful taking of a vehicle and theft, Washington County District Court documents show.
NEWS
By JOSHUA BOWMAN | February 20, 2008
The Washington County Commissioners heard two budget presentations Tuesday. Transportation Department Director Kevin Cerrone asked the commissioners to approve $2.4 million for the department in fiscal year 2009, a 2.82 percent increase over last fiscal year. The transportation department budget funds the County Commuter's five programs, which include the fixed-route bus service, Paratransit program, Ride Assistance, the jobs shuttle and Hopewell Express. Cerrone also asked the commissioners to approve three new positions - two office associates and a part-time mechanic.
NEWS
By KAREN HANNA | August 12, 2007
Road crews made up of inmates have saved Washington County and local municipalities tens of thousands of dollars on tasks that otherwise might not get done, according to county officials. County Administrator Greg Murray said the county pays about $11,000 a year to each of several retired correctional officers who are in charge of supervising inmate crews. The personnel costs are the only costs associated with running the crews, he said. In all, Murray said, the county uses the services of seven crews at a total cost of about $80,000 a year.
NEWS
by ERIN CUNNINGHAM | February 15, 2007
WASHINGTON COUNTY - Several inches of snow covered with a thick layer of ice caused road-clearing efforts in Washington County on Wednesday to take longer than usual. "The snow is heavy," said Ed Plank, director of the county's highway department. "And we can't push it very well. It takes us a lot longer. " According to www.i4weather.net, a Web site maintained by Hagerstown weather observer Greg Keefer, 5 inches of snow and ice was measured on the ground after the storm that began Tuesday morning.
NEWS
March 30, 2006
The Washington County Commissioners on Tuesday named Edwin L. Plank as Highway Department director, according to a written statement. Plank, who has worked for the department for 12 years, replaces Ted Wolford. Wolford, who retired in February, was the director for 30 years. County Commissioner John C. Munson said Wednesday that Plank's salary will be $66,500 a year. Plank served as interim director while the commissioners looked for a new director, according to the statement.
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