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by MATTHEW UMSTEAD | November 17, 2006
MARTINSBURG, W.VA. - A jury of seven women and five men on Thursday took less than three hours to find Edward C. Grimes guilty of second-degree murder in the July 30, 2005, shooting death of Ronald L. Kidrick, 30. The verdict matches the guilty plea the 24-year-old man entered in May as part of an agreement with the Berkeley County Prosecuting Attorney's office, but Grimes' prison sentence now could be more lengthy, officials said. Except for one clenched fist thrust into the air in apparent satisfaction, reaction to the verdict among friends and family of the victim seated in the courtroom was muted.
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NEWS
By MATTHEW UMSTEAD | July 1, 2007
MARTINSBURG, W.VA.-The cost of a speeding ticket conviction in Berkeley County recently inched a little higher, and motorists found guilty of a second citation will have to pay substantially more in court costs alone. At the behest of the Supreme Court of Appeals of West Virginia, magistrates across the state have been directed to charge $160.50 in court costs per conviction, not per ticket. For a two-citation conviction, such as speeding and failure to properly signal, a motorist will be ordered to pay $321 in court costs, not including the actual fines.
NEWS
by GREGORY T. SIMMONS | July 29, 2003
A Maryland appeals court judge ruled that a New York man serving 45 years in prison on charges stemming from a 1998 shooting on Jonathan Street deserves a second sentencing hearing because a judge made comments that since have been ruled impermissible by Maryland's highest court. A jury in July 1999 convicted Nikki James, 30, on attempted second-degree murder and seven other charges related to the shooting of a 19-year-old on Jan. 12, 1998. In September 1999, Washington County Circuit Judge W. Kennedy Boone sentenced James to the maximum penalty for attempted second-degree murder, 30 years, and to an additional 15 years for use of a handgun in a crime of violence.
NEWS
by MATTHEW UMSTEAD | March 14, 2007
MARTINSBURG, W.Va. - State Sen. John Yoder said on Tuesday that he will decide by Dec. 1 as to whether he will seek another four-year term. Yoder, R-Jefferson, also confirmed that he intends to form an exploratory committee to gauge a possible bid for a seat on the bench of the Supreme Court of Appeals of West Virginia, the state's high court. Yoder, 56, was first elected to the State Senate in 1992. In 1996, the Harpers Ferry, W.Va., attorney unsuccessfully campaigned for a seat on the high court.
NEWS
By MATTHEW UMSTEAD | matthew.umstead@herald-mail.com | August 6, 2012
A Berkeley County judge has been assigned to hear a state Supreme Court case involving a pilot public campaign-funding program that he said in December he would comply with when he was mulling a possible 2012 election bid for the high court. Twenty-third Judicial Circuit Judge Christopher C. Wilkes, along with fellow state trial judges James P. Mazzone (1st Circuit) and J. Lewis Marks Jr. (15th Circuit), were assigned to the public campaign-funding case involving Republican state Supreme Court candidate Allen H. Loughry II last week, according to court documents.
NEWS
June 2, 1997
The battle over a contested seat on the Berkeley County Commission has gotten almost complicated to follow without a crib sheet. Just when we believed it was settled, a citizen group plans to challenge the election a second time. Their challenge comes too late, we believe and West Virginia's highest court should reject it. First, some background: In the November 1996 commisssion election, Republican Howard Strauss beat Democrat Robert Burkhart by 157 votes. Burkhart challenged the election, saying that the West Virginia Constitution says two commissioners cannot be "elected from" the same district, and that Commissioner D. Wayne Dunham lived in Strauss's district at the time of the election.
NEWS
By MATTHEW UMSTEAD | February 25, 2009
MARTINSBURG, W.Va. -- The Supreme Court of Appeals of West Virginia, in a 3-2 decision this week, agreed to hear further arguments on a man's appeal of a second-degree murder conviction for the shooting death of Ronald K. Kidrick in a motel parking lot in 2005. In January 2007, Edward C. Grimes, 27, of Martinsburg, was sentenced to 40 years in prison for the July 2005 shooting death of Ronald K. Kidrick of Shepherdstown, W.Va. Grimes' attorney, John P. Adams of the 23rd Judicial Circuit's public defender's office, appealed the case to the high court, alleging there was misconduct before the grand jury, evidentiary error, insufficient evidence to allow the jury to consider first-degree murder and a disproportionate sentence, among other challenges.
NEWS
April 27, 2008
MARTINSBURG, W.Va. (AP) - A Martinsburg attorney's law license has been annulled by the Supreme Court of Appeals of West Virginia. Heidi J. Silver Myers was convicted of criminal contempt of court last January, prompting the state Office of Disciplinary Counsel to ask the high court to annul her license. The court granted that request earlier this month. Myers was indicted for contempt in December 2006 after allegedly ignoring a federal grand jury subpoena. Myers and her office manager still face federal charges alleging they defrauded the state's Public Defender Services.
NEWS
By BOB MAGINNIS | May 27, 2003
In what seems more like a joke than an attempt to be helpful, the Pennsylvania Supreme Court last fall issued two rulings that give candidates for the high court to right to speak out on issues, while restricting what they can say. Confused? We'd bet the candidates are, too. The would-be judges would do well to keep their political statements to a minimum. The first ruling came after the U.S. Supreme Court overturned a Minnesota law which prevented judicial candidates from taking positions on "disputed or political issues.
NEWS
By MATTHEW UMSTEAD | April 16, 2009
MARTINSBURG, W.Va -- Newly elected 23rd Judicial Circuit Judge John C. Yoder said Wednesday that he will make a third bid to be elected to West Virginia's high court in 2010. "I've had a number of people around the state who have been urging me to run for quite some time," said the 58-year-old Harpers Ferry, W.Va., attorney, who was unsuccessful in campaigns for the Supreme Court of Appeals in 1996 and 2000. Yoder, who decided against running again last year, said the death of Justice Joseph P. Albright accelerated his plan to run for the high court in 2012.
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