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Heimlich Maneuver

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NEWS
BY Christine L. Moats | April 22, 2002
The Heimlich Maneuver can be used to help a choking victim clear his airway. A person with a severe or complete airway obstruction will not be able to cough forcefully, speak or breathe. He may make high-pitched noises when he tries to inhale. He may also have one or both hands at his throat; this is the universal sign of choking. Before beginning the Heimlich Maneuver always ask the person, "Are you choking?" Q: How do I help someone who is choking and cannot speak or breathe?
NEWS
May 9, 1998
By GUY FLETCHER Staff Writer Seventh-graders Samuel Guy and Jason Ferguson learned about the life-saving Heimlich maneuver in health class last September, but never thought they would actually get to try it out for real. But on Friday the two Northern Middle School students put their education to heroic use in preventing a classmate from choking to death on a brownie during lunch. "It felt real good," said Samuel, 12. It was Samuel who first rushed to the aid of John Titus, another seventh-grader, who was seated at the same lunch table.
NEWS
August 25, 2008
The Governor's Citation recently was presented to Melissa Delaney of Clear Spring Elementary School for her quick action when a student began choking on a piece of food May 9. Maryland Del. LeRoy E. Myers Jr., R-Washington, Allegany, presented the citation. Delaney, a fourth-grade teacher, performed the Heimlich maneuver on Trevor Shupp when a piece of food became lodged in his throat. After Trevor tried to clear his throat by taking a drink from the water fountain, Delaney noticed his face was deep red and that the student was holding his throat.
NEWS
May 17, 1999
By BRUCE HAMILTON / Staff Writer photo: KEVIN G. GILBERT / staff photographer Because they thought and acted quickly to save another student, two Hagerstown teenagers will receive Maryland Emergency Medical Service Citizen Awards today. Northern Middle School students Jason Ferguson and Samuel Guy are the youngest recipients at this year's EMS awards reception in Baltimore. [cont. from front page ] They join other heroes honored for rescues and community contributions.
NEWS
By JENNIFER FITCH | waynesboro@herald-mail.com | January 19, 2011
Tracy Bonebrake Miller doesn't want hype for what she says was being the right person in the right place at the right time. The flowers and media attention after she helped a choking elementary school student left her visibly uneasy. But 9-year-old Josh McCleaf's parents credit the teacher with the boy walking away from the incident unharmed. "I wanted to see him with my own two eyes and see it was OK," said Denise McCleaf, Josh's mother. "I feel so blessed God put her here at the right time.
NEWS
By STACEY DANZUSO | February 27, 2002
Chambersburg, Pa. - Judy Culbertson doesn't understand what all the fuss is about. With more than 20 years of first-aid training, the Chambersburg resident said she went on autopilot when she performed the Heimlich maneuver on a choking customer at Hoss's Steak and Sea House in December. "I guess that is what training is supposed to do - make it an automatic reflex," Culbertson said. "It didn't seem like that big a deal. " The American Heart Association, however, felt Culbertson should be honored for her efforts and presented her with a Heartsaver award Tuesday.
NEWS
October 5, 1999
KIMBERLY YAKOWSKI / Staff Writer photo: RIC DUGAN / staff photographer Civil Air Patrol cadet Abraham Phares used to joke that in a crisis he would not be able to remember the life-saving skills he had been taught. [cont. from front page ] But when his mother began choking while eating a pretzel Saturday morning he reacted instantly, using the Heimlich maneuver to save her life. "I always thought I would panic and freeze up," said the 14-year-old Williamsport High School student.
NEWS
June 18, 1998
Late last month I wrote a column about a local woman who'd saved a young child's life, but was reluctant to tell her story because she feared embarrassing the child's mother, who'd been "given the slip," as they say, by her kid. In that same column, I asked people to tell me about some heroic behavior they'd observed in the last two years. I didn't figure on a big batch of replies, because people tend to pass along bad news more easily than good, but I did get three.
NEWS
BY KIMBERLY YAKOWSKI | May 6, 2002
kimy@herald-mail.com Hagerstown City Det. Wayne Shank said he decided to become a police officer while in high school, and after 25 years on the force he has never regretted it. "It gets in your blood," said Shank, 45, who will retire this year. During his career, Shank has walked a beat with uniform patrol, handled a dog in the K-9 unit and became a polygraph examiner and a member of the criminal investigation unit. "He's a good man, and we're sorry to see him go," said Hagerstown City Police Chief Arthur Smith.
NEWS
By DAN SPEARS | February 11, 1999
CLEAR SPRING - In through the nose, out through the mouth. Breathing seems so simple when you don't think about it. But take away the nose, and things become much more difficult. The Clear Spring girls basketball team is learning the hard way how to only breathe with its mouth, losing 55-30 to Mercersburg Academy on Wednesday afternoon after playing without leading scorer Jessica Jones, who is out with a broken nose. "Today, what can you say?" Blazers coach Bill Jones asked.
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NEWS
By DAN DEARTH | dan.dearth@herald-mail.com | October 20, 2011
Washington County Emergency Services dispatcher William King said it's nice to get a thank you. The 11-year dispatching veteran recently was recognized as Washington County's Telecommunicator of the Year by the Maryland Emergency Number Systems Board, an organization that coordinates the installation and enhancement of 911 emergency telephone  services systems. "It felt good. It's nice to get a thank you," King said of the award that he received last month during a ceremony in Anne Arundel County.
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NEWS
By JENNIFER FITCH | waynesboro@herald-mail.com | January 19, 2011
Tracy Bonebrake Miller doesn't want hype for what she says was being the right person in the right place at the right time. The flowers and media attention after she helped a choking elementary school student left her visibly uneasy. But 9-year-old Josh McCleaf's parents credit the teacher with the boy walking away from the incident unharmed. "I wanted to see him with my own two eyes and see it was OK," said Denise McCleaf, Josh's mother. "I feel so blessed God put her here at the right time.
NEWS
August 25, 2008
The Governor's Citation recently was presented to Melissa Delaney of Clear Spring Elementary School for her quick action when a student began choking on a piece of food May 9. Maryland Del. LeRoy E. Myers Jr., R-Washington, Allegany, presented the citation. Delaney, a fourth-grade teacher, performed the Heimlich maneuver on Trevor Shupp when a piece of food became lodged in his throat. After Trevor tried to clear his throat by taking a drink from the water fountain, Delaney noticed his face was deep red and that the student was holding his throat.
NEWS
by KAREN HANNA | June 7, 2006
Miller remembered at start of meeting An administrator who died earlier this week was "an outgoing person and liked and beloved by many people in the school system," Superintendent Elizabeth Morgan said, as she and the Washington County Board of Education remembered Patrick Lynn Miller. As he does before each of the board's regular meetings, President W. Edward Forrest began Tuesday's meeting with the Pledge of Allegiance and a moment of silence. He asked that people remember Miller during the moment of silence.
NEWS
BY KIMBERLY YAKOWSKI | May 6, 2002
kimy@herald-mail.com Hagerstown City Det. Wayne Shank said he decided to become a police officer while in high school, and after 25 years on the force he has never regretted it. "It gets in your blood," said Shank, 45, who will retire this year. During his career, Shank has walked a beat with uniform patrol, handled a dog in the K-9 unit and became a polygraph examiner and a member of the criminal investigation unit. "He's a good man, and we're sorry to see him go," said Hagerstown City Police Chief Arthur Smith.
NEWS
BY Christine L. Moats | April 22, 2002
The Heimlich Maneuver can be used to help a choking victim clear his airway. A person with a severe or complete airway obstruction will not be able to cough forcefully, speak or breathe. He may make high-pitched noises when he tries to inhale. He may also have one or both hands at his throat; this is the universal sign of choking. Before beginning the Heimlich Maneuver always ask the person, "Are you choking?" Q: How do I help someone who is choking and cannot speak or breathe?
NEWS
By STACEY DANZUSO | February 27, 2002
Chambersburg, Pa. - Judy Culbertson doesn't understand what all the fuss is about. With more than 20 years of first-aid training, the Chambersburg resident said she went on autopilot when she performed the Heimlich maneuver on a choking customer at Hoss's Steak and Sea House in December. "I guess that is what training is supposed to do - make it an automatic reflex," Culbertson said. "It didn't seem like that big a deal. " The American Heart Association, however, felt Culbertson should be honored for her efforts and presented her with a Heartsaver award Tuesday.
NEWS
By KIMBERLY YAKOWSKI | December 22, 1999
Donna Wishard and her husband Bob were baking cookies for the holidays last week when My Lady, their 14-month old Labrador, started to wheeze and then collapsed. cont. from front page Moments earlier, the female yellow Labrador had been calmly looking out the front window and was in apparent good health, said Donna Wishard, who has had the dog since it was a puppy. "She stopped breathing. I thought she was dead," she said. Before the 65-pound dog fell to the ground, she looked as though she were choking on something.
NEWS
October 5, 1999
KIMBERLY YAKOWSKI / Staff Writer photo: RIC DUGAN / staff photographer Civil Air Patrol cadet Abraham Phares used to joke that in a crisis he would not be able to remember the life-saving skills he had been taught. [cont. from front page ] But when his mother began choking while eating a pretzel Saturday morning he reacted instantly, using the Heimlich maneuver to save her life. "I always thought I would panic and freeze up," said the 14-year-old Williamsport High School student.
NEWS
By BRUCE HAMILTON | July 27, 1999
The eyes lay on classroom tables, sightless in their trays. Armed with probes, tweezers, scissors and scalpels, youngsters wearing white lab coats and latex gloves prepared to take apart the tiny spheres. Dawn Drooger asked them to look at each lens. "Is it hard or soft?" the teacher asked. "Take your scissors and cut it in half. " Cautiously, they picked up and pierced cow eyeballs. Out leaked vitreous humor, a jelly-like transparent substance. The kids kept cutting and concentrating, following written directions.
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