Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: HeraldMail HomeCollectionsHeart Disease
IN THE NEWS

Heart Disease

NEWS
by JENNIFER FITCH | September 25, 2006
GREENCASTLE, PA. - Thirteen became a lucky number Sunday for more than 500 people participating in Franklin and Fulton counties' Heart Walk, which in its 13th year raised just short of $150,000 for the American Heart Association. "Last year, we raised $111,000," event organizer Sharon Strike said. Clear skies and good spirits prevailed on the damp day that brought out young and old to fight heart disease and stroke. "We've had teams and sponsors who really raised more money than they have before," Strike said, noting that 650 people and 70 teams registered.
Advertisement
NEWS
February 23, 2004
It's common knowledge that smoking, high cholesterol and lack of exercise contribute to heart disease. However, there are people who have heart attacks who have never smoked, exercise regularly and have normal cholesterol levels. They find themselves asking, "Why did this happen to me?" Pam Peitz, manager of Washington County Hospital's Cardiac Rehab and Congestive Heart Failure programs, said this has led researchers to look at other factors that may contribute to heart disease.
LIFESTYLE
January 27, 2012
February is National Heart Month. In recognition, a free community seminar, “Heart Disease & Weight Management,” will be presented from 5:30 to 7:30 p.m. Thursday, Feb. 16, at Wilson College's Brooks Complex Auditorium in Chambersburg. Dr. Arshad Safi of Summit Cardiology and Dr. Paul Klink of Summit Weight Management Services will discuss how to reduce your risk of heart disease. Both doctors will discuss the small lifestyle changes you can make to keep your heart healthy. The event is free, but registration is required by Feb. 8. To register, call 717-262-4472.
BUSINESS
March 24, 2011
On Feb. 19, students at My Dance Studio in Smithsburg participated in a fundraiser for women's heart disease. Through "Dancing Feet" and a bake sale, they were able to raise $1,000 to contribute to Cardiac Rehab at Meritus Medical Center.
LIFESTYLE
February 3, 2012
On Tuesday, Feb. 21, West Virginia University Hospitals-East and the WVU Robert C. Byrd Health Sciences Center Eastern Division will sponsor a community mini-medical school program on heart disease. The presentation, titled "Heart Failure," will focus on the early signs and symptoms of heart disease. The program will be held from 7 to 8 p.m. in the Robert C. Byrd Health Sciences Center on the City Hospital campus. Registration is at 6:30 p.m. To register, call 304-264-1287, ext. 1760.
NEWS
By BRENDAN KIRBY | October 2, 1999
Approximately 400 people walked through the North End of Hagerstown Saturday to raise awareness of heart disease - and money to help fight it. The American Heart Association collected about $50,000 from the Heart Walk to help fund research. It was a 43 percent increase over last year's tally. The organizers had set a goal of raising $60,000, but said they were happy with the amount raised. In addition to getting sponsors to donate money, walkers also had the chance to buy little hearts on a bulletin board to honor a heart disease survivor or pay tribute to a victim.
NEWS
February 2, 2004
Washington County Hospital's Cardiac Rehabilitation Program will host a seminar, "Is There Sex After Heart Disease?" at 6:30 p.m. Tuesday, Feb. 3, at Robinwood Medical Center, Conference Room No. 142, 11110 Medical Campus Road, Hagerstown. Use the blue of silver entrance. The seminar is being held in recognition of American Heart Month. The seminar is free. For information, call 301-790-8940.
LIFESTYLE
BY MAEGAN CLEARWOOD | maegan.clearwood@herald-mail.com | June 24, 2011
Portion sizes, sodium content, nutritional value: The road to a healthy lifestyle might seem overwhelming. But according to Rebecca Davis, health and nutrition educator with University of Maryland Extension in Washington County, it's all about baby steps. Strong Women, Healthy Hearts, a program targeted at inactive women older than 40 with a body mass index (BMI) of at least 24, aims to reduce the risk of heart disease while encouraging healthy living habits. "It's important anywhere, but particularly in the United States, obesity rates are rising, particularly among women and adults and we need to stop that," Davis said.
NEWS
October 5, 1997
By KERRY LYNN FRALEY Staff Writer Carl Spessard, 8, had his grandfathers in mind as he briskly covered the two-mile Heart Walk route in downtown Hagerstown Saturday morning. "One of them is in the Baltimore hospital and another has heart disease, but he's not in the hospital," said the Paramount Elementary School third-grader, who said he hoped his walking would help their treatment. Spessard, his younger brother and grandmother were among an estimated 250 participants in this year's event.
LIFESTYLE
February 18, 2011
Micro-CHIP (Coronary Health Improvement Project) will meet from 6:30 to 8:30 p.m. Tuesdays and Thursday, March 1 through March 24 at Hagerstown Seventh-day Adventist Church, 11507 Robinwood Drive, east of Hagerstown. For those concerned about cancer, obesity, diabetes, hypertension, heart disease, osteoporosis, arthritis, or stroke. The event includes eight meals, exercise training, handouts, two screening events, DVD presentations on how to prevent or reverse disease, and demonstrations.
The Herald-Mail Articles
|