Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: HeraldMail HomeCollectionsHearing Loss
IN THE NEWS

Hearing Loss

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
by Christine L. Moats | September 16, 2002
Hearing loss is not uncommon as we begin to age. Factors that contribute to this process include heredity, chronic exposure to loud noises, some medications and certain illnesses. Damage to the inner ear is irreversible, so take care of your ears. Q: What are the signs and symptoms of hearing loss? A: According to the Mayo Clinic's Web site at www.mayoclinic.com, they include: Muffled quality of speech and other sound Difficulty understanding words, especially against background noise or in a crowd of people Asking others to speak more slowly, clearly and loudly The need to turn up the volume of the television or radio Withdrawal from conversations Avoidance of some social settings.
NEWS
November 13, 2009
Hearing loss is more common than many people realize. Current statistics show that more than 31 millions Americans have a significant hearing loss. Of the most common healthrelated problems in American today, hearing loss is ranked third proceeded by high blood pressure and arthritis. However, only one in five people who could benefit from hearing aids actually wears amplification. We are born with all the sensory cells we will have for hearing. These cells begin diminishing as young as 18. However, because hearing decreases over time, it often goes unnoticed until we are in our 50s. The National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders reports that about 15 percent of individuals between the ages of 20 and 69 experience highfrequency hearing loss due to loud noise exposure.
NEWS
by Chris Copley | June 6, 2003
chrisc@herald-mail.com Albert Gatz is an active man with work-toughened hands. After more than 50 years in the construction industry, Gatz's hands remain busy. In the past few years, he has served as contractor for half a dozen homes in Washington County and in the Richmond, Va., area. He has also mentored teenagers who joined his work crews. But talking with his work crews, his sons and their families is occasionally frustrating. Gatz's hearing has deteriorated over the past decade.
NEWS
By TIFFANY ARNOLD | August 23, 2010
A recent national study reported that nearly one out of five teens has some form of hearing loss. Perhaps it's time to quiet down. The Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA) released the results of a study Wednesday, Aug. 18, that examined the prevalence of hearing loss in youths ages 12 to 19, and found there was a greater prevalence of hearing loss among teens between 2005 and 2006 compared with 1988 to 1994. The report didn't assign blame to listening devices as the cause of the problem, but audiologists and national medical organizations have been encouraging teens to lower the volume on their music players and to take note of the noise in their environments.
NEWS
June 6, 2003
Sound is expressed in decibels (dB) on a scale that gets geometrically louder as the numbers increase. Researchers with the National Institute of Deafness and Other Communication Disorders say prolonged exposure to any noise above 90 dB can cause gradual hearing loss. Regular exposure of more than one minute to noises of 110 dB or louder risks permanent hearing loss. 180 - Rocket launch 140 - Rock concerts, firecrackers, jet engine at takeoff 120 - Snowmobiles, ambulance siren, loud cars 110 - Chainsaws 100 - Woodshop background noise 98 - Power drill 96 - Farm tractor 90 - Motorcycle, lawnmower, hairdryer 80 - City traffic noise, phone ringing 60 - Normal conversation 40 - Refrigerator humming 20 to 30 - Whispered voice 0 - Threshold of normal hearing
NEWS
By MARIE GILBERT | May 28, 2009
Christine Claybill thought she lived in a world of mumblers. Her children often had to repeat themselves.  She dropped out of an exercise class because she couldn't understand the instructor. And she scolded her younger co-workers for not speaking more distinctly. But after a routine medical checkup, Claybill discovered the problem wasn't with friends and relatives. "It was me," she said. At the age of 60, Claybill was diagnosed with moderate hearing loss.
NEWS
January 30, 1998
Health notes Equipment treats kidney, ureter, bladder stones FREDERICK, Md. - With the recent purchase of a highly sophisticated piece of equipment, patients can receive fast and effective treatment at Frederick Memorial Hospital for one of the most painful medical conditions known - stones in the ureter, bladder and kidney. Lithotripsy is the procedure for breaking up stones. The majority of patients need only one treatment. The recovery period is short, and most patients go home the same day. When surgery is done, the recovery can take up to several weeks.
BUSINESS
May 11, 2011
Callas Contractors Inc. Callas Contractors Inc. was awarded a contract for construction of the three-bay Jiffy Lube facility on Wesel Boulevard in Hagerstown. The architect for the project is George C. Harne.   Callas also was awarded the $1.5 million 10,000-square-foot addition to the Hagerstown YMCA. The construction will be at the rear of the existing building. The project is scheduled for completion in November 2011. The architect for the project is Bushey Feight Morin Architects of Hagerstown.
NEWS
by MARLO BARNHART | June 27, 2005
HAGERSTOWN marlob@herald-mail.com Pam Harbaugh knew when she brought her newborn daughter home from the hospital that she was deaf, even though the doctors weren't so sure. "She didn't startle," Harbaugh said, noting that sudden, loud noises that would make her jump had no effect on her daughter. Though there is no argument that this hearing loss has affected Jennifer Timmons' life, both her mother and grandmother believe that in the long run, Jennifer has overcome every hurdle in her 18 years.
NEWS
December 26, 1997
First-graders help tell the Easter Seal story Augusta Bowers, youth representative for The Easter Seal Society of Franklin and Adams Counties Inc., takes her duties seriously. Her mother told her recently that she would be meeting a newspaper reporter for an interview. "She said 'Gee, Mom, I have a job now,' " mom Amy Bowers says. The 6-year-old, also the daughter of Kevin Bowers of Mercersburg, Pa., will serve in the honorary position through August.
ARTICLES BY DATE
BUSINESS
May 11, 2011
Callas Contractors Inc. Callas Contractors Inc. was awarded a contract for construction of the three-bay Jiffy Lube facility on Wesel Boulevard in Hagerstown. The architect for the project is George C. Harne.   Callas also was awarded the $1.5 million 10,000-square-foot addition to the Hagerstown YMCA. The construction will be at the rear of the existing building. The project is scheduled for completion in November 2011. The architect for the project is Bushey Feight Morin Architects of Hagerstown.
Advertisement
NEWS
By TIFFANY ARNOLD | August 23, 2010
A recent national study reported that nearly one out of five teens has some form of hearing loss. Perhaps it's time to quiet down. The Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA) released the results of a study Wednesday, Aug. 18, that examined the prevalence of hearing loss in youths ages 12 to 19, and found there was a greater prevalence of hearing loss among teens between 2005 and 2006 compared with 1988 to 1994. The report didn't assign blame to listening devices as the cause of the problem, but audiologists and national medical organizations have been encouraging teens to lower the volume on their music players and to take note of the noise in their environments.
NEWS
November 13, 2009
Hearing loss is more common than many people realize. Current statistics show that more than 31 millions Americans have a significant hearing loss. Of the most common healthrelated problems in American today, hearing loss is ranked third proceeded by high blood pressure and arthritis. However, only one in five people who could benefit from hearing aids actually wears amplification. We are born with all the sensory cells we will have for hearing. These cells begin diminishing as young as 18. However, because hearing decreases over time, it often goes unnoticed until we are in our 50s. The National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders reports that about 15 percent of individuals between the ages of 20 and 69 experience highfrequency hearing loss due to loud noise exposure.
NEWS
By MARIE GILBERT | May 28, 2009
Christine Claybill thought she lived in a world of mumblers. Her children often had to repeat themselves.  She dropped out of an exercise class because she couldn't understand the instructor. And she scolded her younger co-workers for not speaking more distinctly. But after a routine medical checkup, Claybill discovered the problem wasn't with friends and relatives. "It was me," she said. At the age of 60, Claybill was diagnosed with moderate hearing loss.
NEWS
By JEFF SEMLER | September 23, 2008
As agriculture continues to rank as one of the most dangerous occupations in North America and across the globe, the National Safety Council will put the spotlight on farming, ranching and the related health and safety issues. In 2007, there were 715 deaths and 80,000 disabling injuries attributed to agriculture. This year Sept. 21 to 27 is recognized as National Farm Safety and Health Week. The theme for 2008 is "Farm Safely -- Protect Your Investment. " This theme highlights the value of the safety and wellness of the agricultural producer and the importance of protecting hearing, lung function, vision, skin and the musculo-skeletal system.
NEWS
By TIFFANY ARNOLD | September 17, 2007
It used to be that if William "Mike" Kronk were attending a lecture or concert, he'd appear to be digging in his ears. This is what would happen before he got his new hearing aids. When the noise would get too loud or too soft, he had to poke his finger in his ear to turn the volume up or down on the clunky old hearing aids resting in his ears. "Those things were so uncomfortable," said Kronk, 60, of Martinsburg, W.Va. "I just stopped wearing them altogether. " His new hearing aids can discern between background and conversational noise levels.
NEWS
by MARLO BARNHART | June 27, 2005
HAGERSTOWN marlob@herald-mail.com Pam Harbaugh knew when she brought her newborn daughter home from the hospital that she was deaf, even though the doctors weren't so sure. "She didn't startle," Harbaugh said, noting that sudden, loud noises that would make her jump had no effect on her daughter. Though there is no argument that this hearing loss has affected Jennifer Timmons' life, both her mother and grandmother believe that in the long run, Jennifer has overcome every hurdle in her 18 years.
NEWS
by RICHARD F. BELISLE | December 24, 2004
waynesboro@herald-mail.com GREENCASTLE, PA - A soldier from Greencastle was eating lunch 50 feet from the center of a suicide bomb blast that killed 13 GIs, five American civilian workers and wounded 69 other people in a dining hall tent in Iraq Tuesday, according to his wife. Staff Sgt. George Weber, 38, suffered hearing loss in the explosion, his wife, Tammy Weber, 36, said Thursday. She said she learned of the blast before she received word from her husband by e-mail telling her he was OK. The couple communicates by e-mail.
NEWS
June 6, 2003
Sound is expressed in decibels (dB) on a scale that gets geometrically louder as the numbers increase. Researchers with the National Institute of Deafness and Other Communication Disorders say prolonged exposure to any noise above 90 dB can cause gradual hearing loss. Regular exposure of more than one minute to noises of 110 dB or louder risks permanent hearing loss. 180 - Rocket launch 140 - Rock concerts, firecrackers, jet engine at takeoff 120 - Snowmobiles, ambulance siren, loud cars 110 - Chainsaws 100 - Woodshop background noise 98 - Power drill 96 - Farm tractor 90 - Motorcycle, lawnmower, hairdryer 80 - City traffic noise, phone ringing 60 - Normal conversation 40 - Refrigerator humming 20 to 30 - Whispered voice 0 - Threshold of normal hearing
NEWS
by Chris Copley | June 6, 2003
chrisc@herald-mail.com Albert Gatz is an active man with work-toughened hands. After more than 50 years in the construction industry, Gatz's hands remain busy. In the past few years, he has served as contractor for half a dozen homes in Washington County and in the Richmond, Va., area. He has also mentored teenagers who joined his work crews. But talking with his work crews, his sons and their families is occasionally frustrating. Gatz's hearing has deteriorated over the past decade.
The Herald-Mail Articles
|