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Hearing Aids

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NEWS
By TIFFANY ARNOLD | September 17, 2007
It used to be that if William "Mike" Kronk were attending a lecture or concert, he'd appear to be digging in his ears. This is what would happen before he got his new hearing aids. When the noise would get too loud or too soft, he had to poke his finger in his ear to turn the volume up or down on the clunky old hearing aids resting in his ears. "Those things were so uncomfortable," said Kronk, 60, of Martinsburg, W.Va. "I just stopped wearing them altogether. " His new hearing aids can discern between background and conversational noise levels.
NEWS
April 28, 2003
The Maryland State Department of Education has unveiled the Maryland Hearing Aid Loan Bank, a new program administered through the Division of Special Education/Early Intervention Services. Many families with limited or no insurance coverage for hearing aids are unable to purchase aids for their infants and toddlers, often due to insufficient funds or delays in processing insurance claims. The Loan Bank will meet the needs of infants and toddlers with hearing loss by temporarily supplying them hearing aids while their families make arrangements to secure permanent amplification.
NEWS
by PEPPER BALLARD | June 19, 2003
Board OKs reading of new health policy The Washington County Board of Education on Tuesday approved 7-0 the first reading of a new policy regarding the requirements that must be in place in order for the school health staff and emergency personnel to honor "do not resuscitate" orders. Corcoran receives Golden Apple Award Washington County Public Schools Superintendent Elizabeth Morgan on Tuesday gave a Golden Apple Award to Washington County Technical High School teacher Amanda Corcoran.
NEWS
November 13, 2009
Hearing loss is more common than many people realize. Current statistics show that more than 31 millions Americans have a significant hearing loss. Of the most common healthrelated problems in American today, hearing loss is ranked third proceeded by high blood pressure and arthritis. However, only one in five people who could benefit from hearing aids actually wears amplification. We are born with all the sensory cells we will have for hearing. These cells begin diminishing as young as 18. However, because hearing decreases over time, it often goes unnoticed until we are in our 50s. The National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders reports that about 15 percent of individuals between the ages of 20 and 69 experience highfrequency hearing loss due to loud noise exposure.
NEWS
January 18, 2002
Fund set up to help Brody McAfee 1/17 By Bob Maginnis Brody Michael McAfee is a happy little 15-month-old, according to his grandmother, even though he doesn't talk and has just started trying to walk. He's having difficulty with both because he was born with a severe hearing loss in his right ear and only partial hearing in his left. He's been fitted for hearing aids at Johns Hopkins Hospital in Baltimore, but can't get them until the family raises $5,100.
NEWS
By MARLO BARNHART | May 5, 2000
Cindy Kline cried all the way through her son's graduation from Hagerstown Community College because she couldn't hear what was being said. Kline, whose hearing has been affected by Meniere's Disease, said that experience made her acutely aware of how vital hearing is in life's special moments. In that spirit, she is looking forward to this Sunday's 8 a.m. Mass at St. Joseph's Catholic Church in Halfway, which for the first time will be signed for the deaf and hearing-impaired.
NEWS
Linda Murray | Around West Hagerstown | January 25, 2012
• On Thursday, Winter Street Elementary School will hold a PBIS, or Positive Behavior Intervention and Support, winter hop at 5:30 p.m. • A winter wonderland breakfast will be held Friday for students who have had perfect attendance during the month of January. School staff along with community volunteers will make pancakes and sausage to serve to the students. They will also be drawing students' names for prizes. Both Hoffman's and Holsinger's Meats have provided donations of food for the breakfast.
NEWS
Linda Murray | Around West Hagerstown | April 18, 2012
Sarah DeMuth, a fifth-grader in Alyson Carver's class at Salem Avenue Elementary School, has been chosen to sing the national anthem at the Hagerstown Suns home game on July 22, which is the day before Sarah's 11th birthday. Sarah's father, Eric DeMuth, took her to audition in March at Valley Mall. Sarah's mother, Amy DeMuth, said this will be Sarah's first time singing in public, and her family as well as many members of Sarah's church will be at the Suns game to cheer her on. Yard sale planned Salem Reformed Church, at 13182 Salem Church Road (off Cearfoss Pike)
NEWS
By STACI CLIPP / 301-991-4103 | November 17, 2008
Neighborhoods 1st Locust Point There will be a networking meeting today at 5 p.m. at City Hall, fourth floor, room 407, for the Neighborhood 1st groups. For more information, call 301-739-8577, ext. 191. Blood drives planned in area The Washington County Chapter of the American Red Cross will hold the following blood drives: Today, Hagerstown Donor Center, Conrad Court, noon to 6 p.m.; Tuesday, Saint James School, 9 a.m. to 3 p.m.; Wednesday, Hagerstown Donor Center, Conrad Court, noon to 6 p.m.; Thursday, Hagerstown Donor Center, Conrad Court, 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. (sponsored by county employees)
NEWS
December 26, 2004
Fidelity Bank James P. Hamill recently was elected to the board of directors of Fidelity Bank. Hamill is president and CEO of the Washington County Health System. He also is chairman of the board of Covenant Health Systems Inc. in Massachusetts. Hamill is a graduate of Georgetown University in Washington, D.C., and received his master's degree from Georgia State University. 84 Lumber Co. John Schnebly recently was hired as a manager trainee at 84 Lumber in Timonium, Md. Schnebly, a native of Hagerstown, graduated from South Hagerstown High School in 1999 and from Gettysburg (Pa.)
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
Linda Murray | Around West Hagerstown | April 18, 2012
Sarah DeMuth, a fifth-grader in Alyson Carver's class at Salem Avenue Elementary School, has been chosen to sing the national anthem at the Hagerstown Suns home game on July 22, which is the day before Sarah's 11th birthday. Sarah's father, Eric DeMuth, took her to audition in March at Valley Mall. Sarah's mother, Amy DeMuth, said this will be Sarah's first time singing in public, and her family as well as many members of Sarah's church will be at the Suns game to cheer her on. Yard sale planned Salem Reformed Church, at 13182 Salem Church Road (off Cearfoss Pike)
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NEWS
Linda Murray | Around West Hagerstown | January 25, 2012
• On Thursday, Winter Street Elementary School will hold a PBIS, or Positive Behavior Intervention and Support, winter hop at 5:30 p.m. • A winter wonderland breakfast will be held Friday for students who have had perfect attendance during the month of January. School staff along with community volunteers will make pancakes and sausage to serve to the students. They will also be drawing students' names for prizes. Both Hoffman's and Holsinger's Meats have provided donations of food for the breakfast.
OPINION
January 2, 2012
“You should ask your readers how many believe in the daily horoscope. What a waste of space.” - Paramount “I'm calling because my granddaughter ... had layaway, and she works very hard at her job, she helps children with disability, and a stranger came up to her and went on and paid her $40 for her layaway, which I think this is just a wonderful thing here at the holidays. We all need to reach out and touch people like this, and with our hearts and souls. So I just wanted to put this in the Mail Call and let people know there are kind people out there.” - McConnellsburg, Pa., area “I was wondering if there's a program for older people to get hearing aids.
NEWS
November 13, 2009
Hearing loss is more common than many people realize. Current statistics show that more than 31 millions Americans have a significant hearing loss. Of the most common healthrelated problems in American today, hearing loss is ranked third proceeded by high blood pressure and arthritis. However, only one in five people who could benefit from hearing aids actually wears amplification. We are born with all the sensory cells we will have for hearing. These cells begin diminishing as young as 18. However, because hearing decreases over time, it often goes unnoticed until we are in our 50s. The National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders reports that about 15 percent of individuals between the ages of 20 and 69 experience highfrequency hearing loss due to loud noise exposure.
NEWS
By STACI CLIPP / 301-991-4103 | November 17, 2008
Neighborhoods 1st Locust Point There will be a networking meeting today at 5 p.m. at City Hall, fourth floor, room 407, for the Neighborhood 1st groups. For more information, call 301-739-8577, ext. 191. Blood drives planned in area The Washington County Chapter of the American Red Cross will hold the following blood drives: Today, Hagerstown Donor Center, Conrad Court, noon to 6 p.m.; Tuesday, Saint James School, 9 a.m. to 3 p.m.; Wednesday, Hagerstown Donor Center, Conrad Court, noon to 6 p.m.; Thursday, Hagerstown Donor Center, Conrad Court, 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. (sponsored by county employees)
NEWS
By JULIE E. GREENE | March 24, 2008
Michael Kade Fotta, 6, can hear his mother talking to him in their living room as he fidgets on the sofa. Joey Hoffman, 11, can hear his mom talking to him too though he cannot always tell what she's saying just by listening. More often he sees her talking as she signs. Both Washington County boys use cochlear implants to hear. Their parents' say the boys are doing great with the implants. However, they both aren't hearing the same things. Cochlear implants are not hearing aids; they don't amplify sound.
NEWS
By TIFFANY ARNOLD | September 17, 2007
It used to be that if William "Mike" Kronk were attending a lecture or concert, he'd appear to be digging in his ears. This is what would happen before he got his new hearing aids. When the noise would get too loud or too soft, he had to poke his finger in his ear to turn the volume up or down on the clunky old hearing aids resting in his ears. "Those things were so uncomfortable," said Kronk, 60, of Martinsburg, W.Va. "I just stopped wearing them altogether. " His new hearing aids can discern between background and conversational noise levels.
NEWS
By MARLO BARNHART | February 5, 2006
marlob@herald-mail.com Late at night after putting her aging parents to bed, Cheryl Durst said she would hear them shouting out "Good night" and "I love you" to each other in the art studio-turned-apartment of her West Virginia home. "The last thing I would do at night was to take out their hearing aids, which meant they would have to talk loud to hear the other," Cheryl said. But that didn't stop them from reaffirming their love of more than 58 years. An only child, Cheryl lost her mother, Alverta Durst, on Jan. 26 at the age of 88, just 15 days after the death of her father, Arthur Durst.
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