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Health Risks

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NEWS
by TIFFANY ARNOLD | June 30, 2006
WASHINGTON COUNTY As the floodwaters recede, a new set of worries has emerged amid cleanup efforts throughout Washington County this week. Health officials now are warning people about contaminated surface water and other health risks that have arisen in the aftermath of this week's flooding rains. In addition to contaminated water, health officials said people should be concerned about mold, mosquitoes and carbon monoxide poisoning. "It's quite possible that contaminated (surface)
NEWS
November 30, 1999
As the floodwaters recede, local health officials now are warning people about contaminated surface water and other health risks that have arisen. Also, rescuers in Frederick County found the bodies of two teenagers who were swept away by flood waters earlier this week. See Friday's Herald-Mail newspapers for the full stories.
NEWS
By Annette Ipsan/Special to The Herald-Mail | September 25, 2009
They're baaaack. Stink bugs - the scourge of Washington County - have returned. And they've brought friends. They are gathering in great clumps on our screen doors, houses, porches and anything standing still, to frustrate us and give us the creeps. What can you do? First, recognize that they can't harm you. They don't bite, sting or damage our homes. That's small consolation, I know. But they really aren't harmful in any way, just irritating. Stink bugs don't belong here.
NEWS
By DAN DEARTH | January 3, 2008
HAGERSTOWN - In an effort to protect children from secondhand smoke, a Hagerstown man said Wednesday he wants to educate adults about the health risks involved with smoking in vehicles when children are riding as passengers. Andy Smith of Brothers United Who Dare To Care, an organization that was organized to help black men take responsibility for their lives, their families and their community, said clinical studies show that children who are exposed to smoke in confined areas are more likely to suffer from asthma and other long-term illnesses.
NEWS
December 21, 2000
Taxing smokeless tobacco to protect kids a good idea West Virginia's legislative leaders have all but ruled out any tax increases in the 2001 legislative session, but that won't stop Mary Pearl Compton, who chairs the House Health and Human Resources Committee. Armed with a new study that shows children as young as fifth graders are using smokeless tobacco on a regular basis, Compton is determined to tax what she can't outlaw. The study, done by Lynne Gobel of the Marshall University School of Medicine, found that while 90 percent of those young people who don't use smokeless tobacco know it's a health threat, only 75 of those who use it are aware that it's dangerous.
NEWS
September 3, 2004
Should the City of Frederick post the pictures of people arrested for prostitution-related offenses on the city's Web site? Yes. The Herald-Mail routinely publishes pictures of those who've been arrested and those sought by the police, so we don't have a problem with it. However, it would be nice if the Web site included a disclaimer saying that suspects are presumed innocent until proven guilty. And, the city might also consider an innovative anti-prostitution program that started this year in Tucson, Ariz.
NEWS
July 26, 2007
Tobacco workshop scheduled for Aug. 30 MARTINSBURG, W.Va. - A free workshop focusing on the advantages for businesses to reduce employee tobacco use and implementing a tobacco-free workplace policy will be Aug. 30 at City Hospital. "Reducing Employee Tobacco Use: A Solution to Reduce Health Care Costs" will be from 9 to 11 a.m. in the second floor conference room of the Dorothy McCormack Center, according to Teresa E. McCabe, vice president of Marketing & Development for West Virginia University Hospitals-East.
NEWS
by PEPPER BALLARD | July 7, 2003
pepperb@herald-mail.com It costs money to nurture the uninsured, help teenagers avoid health risks, aid ill minds and study the undefined, which is what prompted one large community caretaker to help its less-fortunate caregiving counterparts. The Washington County Health System Inc. awarded $100,000 in grants to the Community Free Clinic, the Boys & Girls Club of Washington County, Turning Point of Washington County and the Irritable Bowel Syndrome Association, in conjunction with the Community Foundation of Washington County.
NEWS
October 26, 1999
By BRENDAN KIRBY / Staff Writer photo: RIC DUGAN / staff photographer WILLIAMSPORT - Washington County health officials are investigating complaints that raw sewage is being dumped in a neighborhood near Conococheague Creek. Greg Swain, a Maugansville resident who farms property off of Rock Hill Road, said he saw a recreational vehicle dump sewage in the intersection of Rock Hill and Everly roads last Friday. He said he was unable to get the vehicle's license number.
NEWS
January 28, 1998
SCHILLER PARK, Ill. (AP) - HoHo's, Twinkies and more than a dozen other types of snacks were recalled in Maryland, Pennsylvania, West Virginia and 18 other states because a bakery might have been contaminated by asbestos. Managers at several Tri-State area food markets said Tuesday they were unaware of the recall. Interstate Brands Corp. said Tuesday it recalled the snacks and closed its plant in this Chicago suburb because of a potential threat from asbestos fibers in insulation removed from a boiler Jan. 11. State inspectors had planned to close the plant Monday night when it was shut down voluntarily.
ARTICLES BY DATE
OPINION
June 8, 2012
Two of my favorite food groups, salt and sugar, were in the news this week. Grease and chocolate, meanwhile, managed to fly under the national radar, at least for the time being. For salt, the news was good, although bad for anyone who has deprived himself of dry-roasted peanuts for the last four decades, and might now be tempted to go after the Department of Agriculture with a machete. Writing an op-ed in the New York Times, health-policy researcher Gary Taubes rather effectively destroys the conventional wisdom that salt is bad for you. In fact, some studies show that the greater danger is getting too little salt.
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NEWS
By Annette Ipsan/Special to The Herald-Mail | September 25, 2009
They're baaaack. Stink bugs - the scourge of Washington County - have returned. And they've brought friends. They are gathering in great clumps on our screen doors, houses, porches and anything standing still, to frustrate us and give us the creeps. What can you do? First, recognize that they can't harm you. They don't bite, sting or damage our homes. That's small consolation, I know. But they really aren't harmful in any way, just irritating. Stink bugs don't belong here.
NEWS
By HEATHER KEELS | January 12, 2008
WASHINGTON COUNTY? Aside from the environmental risks associated with mercury, the chemical also poses health risks to consumers who are exposed to it when a compact fluorescent light bulb breaks, particularly in warm or poorly ventilated indoor spaces, experts say. There is not much certainty regarding what level of mercury exposure is safe, but it's worth taking precautions, especially when it comes to protecting pets, young children and pregnant...
NEWS
By DAN DEARTH | January 3, 2008
HAGERSTOWN - In an effort to protect children from secondhand smoke, a Hagerstown man said Wednesday he wants to educate adults about the health risks involved with smoking in vehicles when children are riding as passengers. Andy Smith of Brothers United Who Dare To Care, an organization that was organized to help black men take responsibility for their lives, their families and their community, said clinical studies show that children who are exposed to smoke in confined areas are more likely to suffer from asthma and other long-term illnesses.
NEWS
July 26, 2007
Tobacco workshop scheduled for Aug. 30 MARTINSBURG, W.Va. - A free workshop focusing on the advantages for businesses to reduce employee tobacco use and implementing a tobacco-free workplace policy will be Aug. 30 at City Hospital. "Reducing Employee Tobacco Use: A Solution to Reduce Health Care Costs" will be from 9 to 11 a.m. in the second floor conference room of the Dorothy McCormack Center, according to Teresa E. McCabe, vice president of Marketing & Development for West Virginia University Hospitals-East.
NEWS
by JENNIFER FITCH | January 19, 2007
QUINCY, PA. - A dozen Quincy Township residents with unsafe levels of a hazardous chemical in their wells are being given bottled water by the Pennsylvania Department of Environmental Protection. Trichloroethylene (TCE), found during testing in October, can cause myriad health problems when ingested, inhaled or contacted by skin. Thirty minutes had passed in a public meeting Thursday regarding the contamination before someone remarked about the health risks. "I've been told this is a cancer-causing agent," Township Solicitor John Lisko said.
NEWS
by TIFFANY ARNOLD | June 30, 2006
WASHINGTON COUNTY As the floodwaters recede, a new set of worries has emerged amid cleanup efforts throughout Washington County this week. Health officials now are warning people about contaminated surface water and other health risks that have arisen in the aftermath of this week's flooding rains. In addition to contaminated water, health officials said people should be concerned about mold, mosquitoes and carbon monoxide poisoning. "It's quite possible that contaminated (surface)
NEWS
by JULIE E. GREENE | May 29, 2006
Travelers' diarrhea, malaria, typhoid fever and driving - yes, driving - are all health issues people should consider when traveling internationally. "I do not advise people to drive in a foreign country," says Dr. Ted Sofish, a doctor in occupational and environmental medicine who has worked at travel clinics for more than 10 years. Sofish is thinking not only of the physical dangers of driving but the legal consequences of getting in an accident in a foreign country. What could be considered involuntary manslaughter here could be homicide in another country, he says.
NEWS
September 3, 2004
Should the City of Frederick post the pictures of people arrested for prostitution-related offenses on the city's Web site? Yes. The Herald-Mail routinely publishes pictures of those who've been arrested and those sought by the police, so we don't have a problem with it. However, it would be nice if the Web site included a disclaimer saying that suspects are presumed innocent until proven guilty. And, the city might also consider an innovative anti-prostitution program that started this year in Tucson, Ariz.
NEWS
by Christine L. Moats | December 22, 2003
There are several risks of being overweight, according to the Weightcontrol Information Network (WIN) of the National Institutes of Health. Overweight individuals are more likely to develop health problems such as high blood pressure, high cholesterol, uncontrolled blood sugar and joint problems. "These conditions can lead to major health problems," noted registered dietician Tim Higgins, clinical manager of Nutrition Services at Washington County Hospital. "The more overweight a person is, the more likely these issues will appear and worsen over time.
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