Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: HeraldMail HomeCollectionsHealth Insurance
IN THE NEWS

Health Insurance

NEWS
by ERIN CUNNINGHAM | January 12, 2007
HAGERSTOWN - The Washington County Teachers Association on Thursday presented two proposals to the Washington County Board of Education during the third round of bargaining for the 2007-08 school year. The association also presented a counterproposal for tuition reimbursement during the meeting that was open to the public. The board presented its salary offer. During negotiations, both sides will negotiate salary. The board presented proposals on tuition reimbursement and the voluntary transfer process at a meeting in December.
Advertisement
NEWS
February 11, 2002
Possible sale of health insurance provider concerns delegate By LAURA ERNDE laurae@herald-mail.com ANNAPOLIS - Ask Del. John P. Donoghue why he opposes the sale of Washington County's largest health insurance provider to a California company and you'll get a doomsday scenario. continued He says higher premiums, less coverage and more red tape could follow if CareFirst, the company that operates Maryland's Blue Cross/Blue Shield plans, converts to a for-profit company and is sold to WellPoint for $1.3 billion.
NEWS
by KATE COLEMAN | November 15, 2004
katec@herald-mail.com Chris and Stacey Harbaugh were at a car show at Valley Mall last Father's Day, showing the fluorescent green 1974 Plymouth Road Runner Chris Harbaugh restored. He was having bad stomach pains and went to the emergency room, where tests were performed. His problem was thought to be viral and he was sent home. The next day he got a call telling him that a scan had revealed a large mass in his chest, and he was advised to see his family doctor. Chris Harbaugh's life changed.
NEWS
by TARA REILLY | August 13, 2002
tarar@herald-mail.com John Weller, who recently retired after 43 years as a Washington County government employee, said Monday he thought the County Commissioners would have been a little more appreciative of his years of service. Weller said the commissioners denied his request to pay health insurance expenses for him and his wife until he becomes eligible for Medicare in six years. He said the total cost to the county would have been about $19,000, or about $3,200 a year.
NEWS
By ARNOLD PLATOU | October 18, 2009
o Dealing with difficult health choices o Employers, individuals face tough choices on health coverage HAGERSTOWN -- Maryland's largest health insurer posted one of its lowest profits ever last year -- even as some of its clients are seeing their highest insurance bills ever. CareFirst BlueCross BlueShield, which covers nearly 3.4 million people in Maryland, northern Virginia and Washington, D.C., cleared $9.3 million -- about "one-tenth of 1 percent" of its $6.6 billion in revenue, said its chief spokesman, Michael Sullivan.
NEWS
By MATTHEW UMSTEAD | August 23, 2008
MARTINSBURG, W.Va. -- A Berkeley County Sheriff's Department deputy is resigning his position because of the cost of the county's insurance policies for family coverage. Deputy Jack Fleagle has accepted a law enforcement job with the Shepherdstown (W.Va.) Police Department, where coverage for his family is free of charge, Fleagle said in an Aug. 13 memo to Sheriff W. Randy Smith. "The health insurance in Berkeley County is just too costly for me," Fleagle said in his resignation memo.
NEWS
by MARIE GILBERT | April 2, 2007
James Renner was never much of a worrier. But worry is what the 64-year-old Hagerstown resident seems to do a lot of these days. He's concerned about getting sick, needing medical treatment or being hospitalized. Renner is without health insurance. Employed as a delivery driver for a local company, Renner said he had to retire recently because he couldn't afford to buy a new van that was required to do his job. When he left, he also left behind his health care benefits.
NEWS
by MARLO BARNHART | March 25, 2003
marlob@herald-mail.com When the word came Monday that the Community Health Center on Walnut Street had received a $601,400 federal grant to expand services to the uninsured, the Rev. C. Richard Masters breathed a sigh of relief. "We were worried because we hadn't heard anything," Masters said Monday. As the president of the newly independent board at the center, he learned in mid-afternoon that the money had been awarded. U.S. Health and Human Services Secretary Tommy G. Thompson said in a press release Monday that the money would be used to improve access to health care for local residents, especially those without health insurance.
NEWS
By JENNIFER FITCH | waynesboro@herald-mail.com | June 7, 2012
The Waynesboro Area School Board and its teachers union will return to the bargaining table Monday morning as they attempt to hammer out a contract deal before a June 15 deadline tied to health insurance. The two sides first started negotiating in January 2010 in anticipation of the last teacher contract expiring June 30, 2010. School board member Rita Daywalt said her side will present again two options largely developed through recent mediations. The teachers union, Waynesboro Area Education Association, has expressed frustration that one of those options was not formally negotiated.
NEWS
January 23, 2002
City eyes health plan cost savings By DAN KULIN dank@herald-mail.com The Hagerstown City Council on Tuesday supported changes intended to save the city money on health insurance coverage for some employees and retirees. But City Administrator Bruce Zimmerman said they don't know how much money any changes could save. The city's health plans are being looked at because of rising costs. City Finance Director Al Martin said health insurance costs were about $2.9 million last year, and are expected to be about $4 million this year.
The Herald-Mail Articles
|