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NEWS
By ALICIA NOTARIANNI | March 7, 2009
CLEAR SPRING -- The outdoors is still great. That is the message staff members at the Claud Kitchens Outdoor School at Fairview try to instill in fifth-graders who visit the school. Over the course of several days, students in the fifth-grade overnight program go fishing, hiking and canoeing, investigate animals, explore hiking trails and even dabble in orienteering. It is all part of the school's vision to promote appreciation and understanding of the environment. The school extended that vision beyond fifth-graders and out to the public Saturday at the Maple Sugar Festival.
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NEWS
By DON AINES | November 30, 1999
CLEAR SPRING ? The first kites took to the air more than 2,000 years ago, the Chinese having learned to create the sail, bridle and string from silk and the frame from strips of bamboo. On Saturday, Matt Koebel and Jared Henry put together simple kites for children using modern equivalents ? plastic trash bags, dowel rods, masking tape and string. April is National Kite Month, but the last day of March brought families out to the Fairview Outdoor Education Center for its fourth annual Kite Festival.
NEWS
by PEPPER BALLARD | April 25, 2004
pepperb@herald-mail.com CLEAR SPRING - While passing out fliers to drivers Saturday for the Fairview Outdoor Education Center's 25th anniversary celebration at the entrance to the children's nature school, Alan Shane said he didn't mind that people passed him up. Humble about his role in Washington County Public Schools' only outdoor school, Shane, a retired county teacher who first took classes full of giddy children to a similar center...
NEWS
May 31, 1997
By VANDANA SINHA Staff Writer SMITHSBURG - It took audience members only about an hour and a half Friday to glimpse into the lives, talents and personalities of the nine 1997 graduates of the Washington County Job Development Center. Jessica and Danny were the academic aspirants, Diana just started living on her own, Adriano was the dancer, Jamie didn't let anything stop him from trying something new and Matt, well, he's a "character. " But what linked each of the nine graduates was their achievement despite physical and emotional obstacles and their collective step into the "adult world," which many of them called it. Board of Education members Robert Kline and Andrew Humphreys presented the certificates of graduation to Trenton Armagost, 21, of Hagerstown; Matthew Bowman, 21, of Williamsport; Diana Hull, 21, of Williamsport; Adriano Liz, 21, of Funkstown; Jamie Mann, 20, of Boonsboro; Sabrina Meihls, 17, of Hagerstown; Jessica Stine, 21, of Williamsport; Bessie Taylor, 21, of Hagerstown; and Daniel VanMeter, 20, of Williamsport.
NEWS
By DON AINES | April 1, 2007
CLEAR SPRING-The first kites took to the air more than 2,000 years ago, the Chinese having learned to create the sail, bridle and string from silk and the frame from strips of bamboo. On Saturday, Matt Koebel and Jared Henry put together simple kites for children using modern equivalents - plastic trash bags, dowel rods, masking tape and string. April is National Kite Month, but the last day of March brought families out to the Fairview Outdoor Education Center for its fourth annual Kite Festival.
NEWS
By DON AINES | November 22, 2008
CHAMBERSBURG, Pa. -- Wearing a pink T-shirt with the words "STOOD UP" across the front, Principal Paul Sick strummed a guitar and led a room full of Falling Spring Elementary School students in song: "Don't laugh at me, don't call me names, Don't get pleasure from my pain, In God's eyes we're all the same, Some day we'll all have perfect wings, Don't laugh at me. " "He's good," student Shaqon Baker said after Sick...
NEWS
By PEPPER BALLARD | November 30, 1999
CLEAR SPRING ? For the past two weeks, three Clear Spring High School students have measured tapped sap from the Fairview Outdoor Education Center's sugar maple trees in preparation for the Saturday's fourth annual Maple Sugar Festival. What they've found, according to both the students and retired state park ranger Chuck Bowler, is that this winter's temperatures have made for low sap production. "It's a bad year for sap," Bowler said. "It's either been completely cold or completely warm.
NEWS
by BRIAN SHAPPELL | January 19, 2004
shappell@herald-mail.com Fans of fire lookout towers generally look for three things - the structure, the people in charge of the tower and the view from the top. Even though thick fog circled the ice- and sludge-covered fire tower at the Fairview Outdoor Education Center on Sunday, observers said they got two out of three things they seek. "And that ain't bad," said Keith A. Argow, national chairman of the Forest Fire Lookout Association. Between eight and 10 members of the association made the unnamed tower at the Fairview center their first stop on an eight-tower tour Sunday despite the wintry mix falling from the sky. The members were at the association's annual national meeting, held over the weekend at Penn State Mont Alto.
NEWS
by JULIE E. GREENE | January 19, 2005
julieg@herald-mail.com An Environmental and Agricultural Science Academy that would expand the traditional agricultural program is expected to start at Clear Spring High School next fall with the freshman class, Arnold Hammann, a Washington County Board of Education official, said Tuesday night. Professionals in environmental and agricultural career fields are being consulted as curriculum is developed for the academy, said Sharon Chirgott, a resource teacher for the School Board's academy programs.
NEWS
April 25, 2011
The next rain-barrel workshop at Claud E. Kitchens Outdoor School at Fairview is scheduled for Saturday, May 7, from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m.   The workshop provides individuals and families an opportunity to complete the simple assembly of a rain barrel, and learn about water conservation and water recycling. The workshop will be held at the bus pavilion. Admission is free; the cost of each rain-barrel kit is $30. Materials must be paid for with cash. Registration is required to ensure materials are available for everyone.
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