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Hazardous Materials

NEWS
May 25, 2012
A blue liquid found inside a suspicious package on a Mapleville Road driveway Thursday night proved not to be hazardous, according to a Washington County emergency service official. The liquid had a neutral pH, had no odor or any other indication it was hazardous, Deputy Emergency Services Director Charlie Summers said Friday. The black package found shortly after 7 p.m. on Tuesday on the 21000 block of Mapleville Road was about 1-foot wide and 1-foot deep and had the word “contaminants” written on it, fire officials said on Thursday.
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NEWS
BY SCOTT BUTKI | April 10, 2002
A contract for a company to start removing hazardous materials at the Baldwin House complex for what will become the University System of Maryland Hagerstown Education Center is expected to be awarded in early May, a system official said Tuesday. The contractor, which would also shore up the complex in downtown Hagerstown, would be expected to start work soon afterward, said Mark Beck, University System capital planning director. The $870,000 for that work is in this year's state budget.
NEWS
By MARLO BARNHART | July 9, 2008
HAGERSTOWN -- In a way, veteran Hagerstown firefighter Richard T. "Dick" Hopkins' work experience has come full circle in his new job with the International Association of Fire Fighters. Hopkins joined that union in 1974 when he became a relief driver and later an apparatus operator at Western Enterprise Fire Co. "Then, I became a battalion chief in 1980 and I was out of the union," he said, having joined management with that promotion. Hopkins, 56, was serving in that supervisory position when he learned that the IAFF had an opening at the national headquarters in Washington, D.C., just two blocks from the White House.
NEWS
October 21, 1997
By MARLO BARNHART Staff Writer Washington County Commissioners President Gregory I. Snook admits that when he first took office he didn't know what the Local Emergency Planning Committee was, let alone what it did. "Now that I know, I also know we are all a little safer because of the work of LEPC," Snook said at the organization's 10th anniversary recently. The organization informs and educates citizens about the potential hazards of chemical emergencies in Washington County.
NEWS
By DAVE McMILLION | April 28, 2008
CHARLES TOWN, W.Va. - About 150 people were evacuated from the Wal-Mart along U.S. 340 north of Charles Town Sunday night after two people inside reported having respiratory problems, a fire official said. Emergency officials sampled the air inside the store but detected no problems, said Ed Smith, chief of Independent Fire Co. It is possible the two people smelled an odor that was common in the store but odd to them, Smith said. The store was closed about 8 p.m. but was expected to reopen about 10 p.m., according to Smith.
NEWS
BY LAURA ERNDE | March 28, 2002
ANNAPOLIS - With the Maryland House of Delegates poised to pare the state's capital budget, Hagerstown's university project looks secure, Del. Sue Hecht said Wednesday. Hecht, D-Frederick/Washington, serves on the subcommittee that will decide as soon as Friday what to carve out of the capital budget. "I'm feeling really confident. We're continuing to watch it in these last very confusing days," she said. The House cuts represent the biggest thing standing in the way of the University System of Maryland Hagerstown Education Center.
NEWS
October 1, 1997
A $20,750 federal grant will help a Washington County group better educate people about hazardous chemicals and emergencies. The United States Environmental Protection Agency has awarded the grant to the Washington County Local Emergency Planning Committee. The Washington County Commissioners provided a matching grant of $4,250. The grant will pay for public service announcements on local television, a training video on using hazardous materials, a large-screen projector system for presentations and brochures and pamphlets.
NEWS
by JENNIFER FITCH | April 19, 2007
WAYNESBORO, PA. - After no comment was offered from residents during a public hearing Wednesday, a recycling center proposed on East Sixth Street was unanimously approved by the Waynesboro Borough Council. The center will weigh materials from businesses and residents, then purchase and process them, Brandon Williard said. The recycled material is sent to mills, he said. Williard opened Tri-State Recycling in Shippensburg, Pa., in 1999 and said the move will provide a slight expansion.
NEWS
April 28, 2003
HARPERS FERRY, W.Va. - Plans to restore the Harpers Ferry Train Station are moving forward, Harpers Ferry National Historic Park Superintendent Don Campbell announced. Campbell said in a news release that a recently signed agreement between the town of Harpers Ferry and the park will enable a $320,000 state grant to be released for restoration of the train station. This money, coupled with $1.9 million in federal funds secured by U.S. Sen. Robert C. Byrd, D-W.Va., makes the project fully funded, Campbell said.
NEWS
May 23, 2008
Editor's note: On Fridays, Herald-Mail reporters and editors will answer some of the questions that are called in by readers to Mail Call. Consider this us returning your call. What kind of trash can you put out? Comment: "I just want to let people know I talked to City Hall, and we can now put any type of trash out along with your garbage, as long as it's under 50 pounds, no chemicals or no tires. " - Hagerstown Answer: City Engineer Rodney Tissue said "any type of trash" is too much of a generalization.
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