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Harvest Festival

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NEWS
by ANDREW SCHOTZ | September 20, 2005
andrews@herald-mail.com A harvest festival that a Hagerstown city councilman criticized for its religious overtones still will be held, but without city support, an event organizer said Monday. Business owner Wesley Weese said the Oct. 22 event - with Christian music and a tour of churches - is meant to be religious and will be funded through donations from local churches. "It's also about healing the people downtown ...," Weese said. "People don't have a (moral)
NEWS
by DAVE McMILLION | October 21, 2002
charlestown@herald-mail.com MARTINSBURG, W.Va. - A line of contestants appeared on each side of 59-year-old Lorraine Davis during the apple-peeling contest at the 23rd annual Mountain State Apple Harvest Festival Sunday afternoon. But there was no way they could out-peel this country girl. The contestants were given 15 minutes to cut the longest apple peel. Using her favorite vegetable peeler, Davis cut a string of apple peel 22 feet, 2 1/2 inches long. Davis, who has won the contest about five times over the years, said she developed her peeling expertise while growing up on her family's dairy farm in the Nipetown area in northern Berkeley County.
NEWS
October 4, 2007
The Grossnickle Church of the Brethren's Growing Project will hold a Harvest Festival on Sunday, Oct. 14, at 3 p.m. at the Growing Project farm, 11720 Wolfsville Road, Myersville, Md. (near Wolfsville on Md. 17). The festival will celebrate the success of this year's project and will include a Service of Thanksgiving. The Growing Project is one of 193 projects throughout the United States sponsored by the Foods Resource Bank. FRB is an innovative organization that funds food security programs in the developing world.
NEWS
August 21, 2006
Yard sale and craft vendors are encouraged to participate in a harvest festival at Beaver Creek Christian Church on Saturday, Oct. 28. Tables cost $10 each. Those interested in participating can contact Cindy at 301-797-4436 or at smoketownuniv@myactv.net .
NEWS
August 6, 2007
Beaver Creek Creeky Quilters are now selling tickets for their 2007 quilt raffle which is king-sized and all hand-quilted. Tickets cost $1 each or six for $5 and are available by calling 301-797-6586. As in years past, 80 percent of all proceeds from the quilt will be donated to Cumberland Valley Breast Cancer Awareness. Last year, with the help of the community, the quilters were able to donate $1,062 to CVBCA. This year's quilt will be raffled Saturday, Sept. 29, during the Harvest Festival at Beaver Creek Christian Church, 9711 Beaver Creek Church Road, Hagerstown.
NEWS
By SUSIE HOFFMAN | September 22, 2009
Homecoming plans in the making If you have a student in your home who attends South Hagerstown High School, then you know that homecoming is just two short weeks away. The hunt for the perfect homecoming dress and date is on. No more is the dance immediately following the Friday night game so that the football players have just enough time for a quick shower and possibly one dance. So welcome, homecoming weekend. Getting a jump on the weekend, Thursday, Oct. 1, is the pep rally and bonfire on the girls softball field.
NEWS
October 31, 2006
MYERSVILLE, Md. - Much of the harvest is in and soon, three area churches hope to know how much reward they have reaped for a poor community in Africa. About 120 members of the Grossnickle Church of the Brethren near Myersville, the Hagerstown Church of the Brethren and the Welty Church of the Brethren near Smithsburg gathered here Oct. 15 for a Harvest Festival celebration. Last spring, farmer Donnie Grossnickle planted corn, wheat, hay and soybeans on 55 acres donated by Grossnickle members Patty and Jeff Hurwitz for a Growing Project.
NEWS
by ANDREW SCHOTZ | September 14, 2005
HAGERSTOWN andrews@herald-mail.com Councilman Lewis C. Metzner on Tuesday balked at a merchants group's proposed festival, saying the event has a religious slant and the city shouldn't sponsor it. He objected to having "inspirational" music, which is "about nothing but Jesus Christ," he said. He also criticized the group's "hope to bring back revival in the city," which he said summons an age when two current council members would have been forbidden from holding public office.
NEWS
By MARLO BARNHART | September 19, 1998
The next few weeks are not only the busiest but also the most solemn and festive for Jewish people everywhere. Here in Washington County, a whirl of activities begins on Sunday, Sept. 20, with Rosh Hashanah, the Jewish New Year. "There will be a service that night at 8 p.m. and on Monday, Sept. 21, at 10 a.m., for the one-day observance that says we are happy to be starting the year off afresh," said Rabbi Janice Garfunkel of B'Nai Abraham. At 4 p.m. on Sept. 21 there is a service at the synagogue followed an hour later by a walk to Hagerstown City Park where a tradition of throwing crumbs in the lake, symbolizing throwing away sins, is called Tashlich.
NEWS
September 22, 2005
"I read with amusement the response about the Harvest festival that Ms. Parson-McBean was proposing. The individual was talking about the principles that our country was founded on. Obviously, we still need to talk about it because this individual is either choosing to forget some of the details, or didn't learn them initially. The Constitution says something about separation of church and state, but it also says something about freedom of religion. The colonists came from England because England was trying to force them to practice a certain religion.
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NEWS
By MATTHEW UMSTEAD | matthewu@herald-mail.com | May 3, 2013
Tough Mudder's event team is expected to meet with Berkeley County officials this month to discuss plans and resources for endurance series' fall event near Martinsburg, which is slated for the same October weekend as the Mountain State Apple Harvest Festival. “They are aware of the Mountain State Apple Harvest Festival in Berkeley County on the same weekend and are looking forward to working with the community then to ensure both events are fully resourced,” Tough Mudder spokesperson Ashley Pinakiewicz said Friday via email.
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NEWS
By DAN DEARTH | dan.dearth@herald-mail.com | October 20, 2012
The B&O Roundhouse in Martinsburg finally found a place Saturday in the city's annual Mountain State Apple Harvest Festival - almost 150 years to the day that Confederate soldiers set fire to the original structure. For the first time in the 33-year history of the event, organizers used the historic roundhouse at 100 E. Liberty St. as the venue of the festival's arts and crafts show. Barbara Frankenberry, president of the festival's board of directors, said the arts and crafts show initially was held at the West Virginia Air National Guard base in town.
NEWS
By MATTHEW UMSTEAD | matthew.umstead@herald-mail.com | October 18, 2012
The 33rd Mountain State Apple Harvest Festival parade on Saturday is expected to effectively detour traffic in downtown Martinsburg for more than three hours, according to organizers and police. Vehicle traffic will be prohibited from traveling on the parade route and the course for Apple Trample 5K race beginning about 11:30 a.m. Saturday, police said. The parade, which starts in the 1300 block of West King Street, is slated to start at 1 p.m. With 196 parade units registered, Apple Harvest Festival board member Kevin McBee said this week he expects the procession could last three to four hours from start to finish.
LIFESTYLE
By CRYSTAL SCHELLE | crystal.schelle@herald-mail.com | October 14, 2012
If it weren't for a Whammy, "General Hospital" star Scott Reeves' life might have taken a different route. Reeves is best known for roles as Steven Webber on "GH" as well as Ryan McNeil on "The Young and the Restless. " But his first TV appearance was in 1984 when he was on the game show "Press Your Luck. " He was 18. "I racked up 10 grand, then got a Whammy," he said during a telephone interview from his home outside of Nashville, Tenn. "To me, that was like a million bucks. Then it all crumbled.
NEWS
By RICHARD F. BELISLE | richardb@herald-mail.com | October 15, 2011
Julie Brown sat on the curb at the corner of Martin and Queen streets Saturday afternoon, camera at the ready. She was waiting for the Martinsburg High School Marching Band to pass the corner during the 32nd edition of the Mountain State Apple Harvest Festival parade, which featured more than 180 units. As Rachel Brown, a 15-year-old saxophonist in the band, made the turn with the band, Julie stood up, leaned forward and snapped a photo that was sure to be a candidate for the Brown family album.
NEWS
October 14, 2011
Martinsburg's town square will reopen Saturday for the 32nd Mountain State Apple Harvest Festival parade, but then immediately be closed again so contractors can complete pedestrian-safety improvements. Due to inclement weather, the state Division of Highways said Friday that it had extended the closure of the intersection of Queen and King streets beyond the initial estimate of five to seven days. However, a new completion date for the modification of pavers in the square was not announced.
NEWS
By MATTHEW UMSTEAD | matthew.umstead@herald-mail.com | October 12, 2011
 Parking restrictions along the route for the 32nd Mountain State Apple Harvest Festival's grand feature parade and the 5K Apple Trample will be enforced starting at 8 a.m., Saturday. Any vehicle that remains parked along the parade route and certain adjoining city blocks will be towed, the Martinsburg Police Department said in a news release. The parking restrictions will remain in effect until the conclusion of the parade, which is set to begin at 1 p.m.   The parade for the four-day festival will start in the 1300 block of West King Street and proceed east through the historic downtown business district via Raleigh, Martin and Queen streets before disbanding at Martinsburg High School.
NEWS
By MADGE MILES | October 30, 2009
New senior housing complex to be named for Brooks, grandfather The Hagerstown Housing Authority has announced that the name of the 60-unit elderly housing complex planned to be built within the next two years will be named the C.W. Brooks Building. The authority was recently awarded a $9.88 million federal grant to build the complex at the former H. L. Mills Station site on Baltimore Street in Hagerstown. The authority is naming the complex in honor of Carolyn Brooks and her grandfather, T. Andrew Williams.
NEWS
By TRISH RUDDER | October 17, 2009
If you go   What: 30th annual Mountain State Apple Harvest Festival When: Today, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Where: Berkeley County Youth Fair Grounds, Golf Course Road, Martinsburg, W.Va. Cost: $3, ages 7 and older; ages 6 and younger admitted free For a complete list of events, go to www.msahf.com MARTINSBURG, W.VA. -- Saturday was a wet day as the 30th annual Mountain State Apple Harvest Festival continued in Martinsburg. But the rainy weather didn't affect the Arts & Crafts Show at the Berkeley County Youth Fair Grounds "Even though it drizzled part of the day, the crafts are inside," said Tammy Houser, director of the Arts & Crafts Show.
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