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Gypsy Moth

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NEWS
By JULIA COPLEY | June 25, 2007
The sound of a gypsy moth infestation is distinctive: It sounds like a gentle summer rain. That's the sound of millions of gypsy moth droppings falling through the trees. Weathering the worst gypsy moth outbreak in 12 years, Washington County is in the middle of a waste monsoon. Bob Tichenor, chief of Forest Pest Management for the Maryland Department of Agriculture, has been dealing with gypsy moths for 25 years. He says their population seems to go through five-year cycles, and 2007 is right in the middle of a big one. "We have defoliation from Cecil to Garrett (counties)
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NEWS
June 18, 2007
The Washington County office of the University of Maryland Cooperative Extension has received about a dozen calls reporting trees being stripped of leaves by gypsy moths, an official said Friday. Most come from homeowners with large numbers of oak trees, a gypsy moth favorite, said Annette Ipsan, extension educator for horticulture. "Unfortunately, there is no control available that kills the larger caterpillars we are seeing now. It's important to use control measures earlier in the season and to understand that most trees can handle a year or two of attack," Ipsan said.
NEWS
By TAMELA BAKER | April 22, 2006
ANNAPOLIS Sometimes, the best way to get rid of a bug is to just zap it. Gov. Robert Ehrlich announced this week that the state will treat 25,500 acres of land in eight counties, including Washington, for gypsy moth infestation. Aerial spraying of the affected areas will begin next month, according to Bob Tichenor, chief of forest pest management for the Maryland Department of Agriculture. All affected landowners already have been notified, Tichenor said. The Cooperative Gypsy Moth Suppression Program expects to treat 2,851 acres in Washington County, mainly in the far eastern and far western areas of the county.
NEWS
April 27, 2003
"Trees that are stressed are more vulnerable to defoliation and the opportunistic organisms that frequently attack them, so efforts should be made to keep trees in a good state of health or vigor. " That's according to a gypsy moth handbook created for the U.S. Department of Agriculture. Some tips: Cutting, filling, grading, paving and other construction can hurt a tree's soil and root system. Keep the forest floor surface as natural as possible in wooded backyards.
NEWS
by ANDREW SCHOTZ | April 27, 2003
The two insecticides most commonly used to destroy gypsy moths are Bacillus thuringiensis, or Bt, and diflubenzuron, which is known as Dimilin. Bt, which is bacteria-based, is used near water. It's a stomach poison that stops gypsy moths from feeding after they ingest it. Dimilin, a chemical insect growth regulator, is used away from water. It's a chitin inhibitor that prevents insects from molting from one stage to the next. Some national parks use an insecticide called Gypchek.
NEWS
by ANDREW SCHOTZ | April 27, 2003
andrews@herald-mail.com This year, trees have a fighting chance. Armies of gypsy moths continue to gnaw leaves, but their numbers have dwindled, which means less defoliation, agriculture experts say. West Virginia will spray a little more than 4,000 acres with insecticide this year, a steep drop from the 75,000 acres sprayed last year. Maryland's insecticide spraying program will be cut in half this year. Pennsylvania's gypsy moth population has dropped off so much the state won't spray insecticide this year.
NEWS
by RICHARD BELISLE | March 31, 2003
waynesboro@herald-mail.com They're not pretty. Their names are nearly impossible to pronounce. But they're doing the job. One is a fungus called Entomophaga maimaiga, the other a virus named nucleopolyhedrosis. Both are wreaking havoc on gypsy moths - so much so that the Pennsylvania Bureau of Forestry won't have to spray forests this spring because gypsy moth populations are the lowest they've been in years. Two years ago, said Bruce W. Kile, a forester at the 85,000-acre Michaux State Forest headquarters in Fayetteville, the state sprayed 169,000 acres of forests.
NEWS
May 21, 2001
Gypsy moth spraying begins By KIMBERLY YAKOWSKI kimy@herald-mail.com They don't look intimidating but the small, furry gypsy moth caterpillar can be a farmer or homeowner's worst nightmare. The insects have voracious and indiscriminate appetites for leaves and can damage a tree in a short period, said Mark Taylor, program coordinator of the Maryland Department of Agriculture gypsy moth survey and control program. Taylor said that this year, workers are spraying 48,543 acres across the state to stop the tiny terrors.
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