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OPINION
By TIM ROWLAND | timr@herald-mail.com | March 25, 2012
Disputes over public spending and public projects are as old as the republic itself, so the Washington County Commissioners aren't breaking any new ground by revisiting the topic. Back when people really believed in limited federal government (in 1800, Ron Paul would have looked like Barney Frank) lawmakers frowned on the thought of the federal government doing so much as grading a road. But not all lawmakers. If you disdain a massive federal government with its massive outlays of cash and its nose under every commercial tent, you might want to blame the Great Lakes and, while you're at it, beavers.
NEWS
By DAN DEARTH | April 15, 2010
Slide show: Tea Party Tax Day Rally HAGERSTOWN -- Two 55-passenger buses filled with local Tea Party members left Hagerstown to attend the conservative movement's national rally Thursday evening in Washington, D.C. Some dressed in patriotic clothing, while others waved flags and held signs that read "Socialism is Stupid" and "Stop Bankrupting America" to protest excessive government spending. "I think the Tea Party is here to stay," Garrett County resident Lynn Patton said.
NEWS
May 11, 2010
WASHINGTON (AP) -- Congressional budget referees say President Barack Obama's new health care law could potentially add another $115 billion over 10 years to government health care spending. If Congress approves all the additional spending, that would push the 10-year cost of the overhaul above $1 trillion -- an unofficial limit the Obama administration set early on. The Congressional Budget Office said Tuesday the added spending includes $10 billion to $20 billion in administrative costs to federal agencies carrying out the law, as well as $34 billion for community health centers and $39 billion for American Indian health care.
NEWS
By ANDREW SCHOTZ | andrews@herald-mail.com | October 20, 2011
Editor's note: This is one in an occasional series of profiles about candidates running for election in the 6th Congressional District. While working on U.S. Senate candidate Jim Rutledge's campaign last year, Robert Coblentz became a Republican. Coblentz said he heard Rutledge interviewed on the radio, liked his conservative views and decided to help him. He was an independent voter, but decided that the Republican Party matched his values and principles. Rutledge lost a Republican primary, but won Washington County.
NEWS
July 27, 2005
FREDERICK, Md. ? U.S. Rep. Roscoe Bartlett, R-Md., filed for re-election Monday to represent the Sixth District, according to a news release from his office. Bartlett filed in Annapolis. Bartlett said in the release his biggest accomplishment in office was keeping his word. He said he believes the federal government is too big, and taxes and regulates too much. He said he has voted for lower taxes, less government spending and fewer regulations. Bartlett has served in the U.S. House of Representatives since 1992, a total of seven terms.
OPINION
July 16, 2013
Del. Kump has good ideas for West Virginians To the editor: West Virginia Del. Larry D. Kump is one of the few very bright light bulbs in the state Legislature. He gets it. In particular, his suggestion that some of the tax revenue from gas severance be set aside to pay for roads is particularly appropriate, given the damage done to the roads by trucks associated with gas, oil, mineral and timber harvesting in W.Va. His idea about returning some of the revenue to the people of the state (as Alaska has done for years)
NEWS
By MATTHEW UMSTEAD | April 15, 2009
MARTINSBURG, W.Va. -- Hundreds of people rallied Wednesday in the Eastern Panhandle against government spending and taxes, joining thousands across the nation who took part in hundreds of such "tea" party protests on tax day. "Basically, the government just needs to stop -- they need to think about what they're doing," Kathy Lane said as she held a sign attached to a yardstick at the corner of East King and South Queen streets in Martinsburg for...
NEWS
By DON AINES | November 5, 2008
CHAMBERSBURG, Pa. -- Republican Richard Alloway II easily defeated Democrat Bruce Tushingham to become the successor to Pennsylvania state Sen. Terry Punt in the 33rd District, according to incomplete and unofficial results from Tuesday's election. "We won this election together as a team," Alloway told supporters. At the same time, he said the state is facing very serious issues as he prepares to take office. "Everyone is aware of the economic challenges facing our country.
NEWS
By DON AINES | November 5, 2008
CHAMBERSBURG, Pa. - Republican Richard Alloway II easily defeated Democrat Bruce Tushingham to become the successor to Pennsylvania state Sen. Terry Punt in the 33rd District, according to incomplete and unofficial results from Tuesday's election. "We won this election together as a team," Alloway told supporters. At the same time, he said the state is facing very serious issues as he prepares to take office. "Everyone is aware of the economic challenges facing our country.
OPINION
By ANDREW A. SERAFINI | May 5, 2013
In an effort to provide open and transparent government, the Washington County delegation to the Maryland General Assembly will be hosting a post-legislative public forum on Thursday, May 9, 2013. The forum will begin at 6:30 p.m. and will be held in Room 212 of the Career Programs Building on the campus of Hagerstown Community College. The delegation members will give a brief overview of the 2013 legislative session and afterwards, audience members will be able to ask questions. The event is free and open to the public.
ARTICLES BY DATE
OPINION
July 16, 2013
Del. Kump has good ideas for West Virginians To the editor: West Virginia Del. Larry D. Kump is one of the few very bright light bulbs in the state Legislature. He gets it. In particular, his suggestion that some of the tax revenue from gas severance be set aside to pay for roads is particularly appropriate, given the damage done to the roads by trucks associated with gas, oil, mineral and timber harvesting in W.Va. His idea about returning some of the revenue to the people of the state (as Alaska has done for years)
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OPINION
By ANDREW A. SERAFINI | May 5, 2013
In an effort to provide open and transparent government, the Washington County delegation to the Maryland General Assembly will be hosting a post-legislative public forum on Thursday, May 9, 2013. The forum will begin at 6:30 p.m. and will be held in Room 212 of the Career Programs Building on the campus of Hagerstown Community College. The delegation members will give a brief overview of the 2013 legislative session and afterwards, audience members will be able to ask questions. The event is free and open to the public.
OPINION
By TIM ROWLAND | timr@herald-mail.com | May 13, 2012
Oh, to be a fly on the wall up at Camp David a week from now, when all the former leaders of Europe assemble for what will be half world summit, half Auld Lang Syne. All right, not quite that bad, but voters in Greece and France dealt significant blows to their ruling parties last week, as les citoyens have become increasingly disillusioned with the policies of deficit reduction - unaffectionately known in Europe as “austerity.” Whatever it means for Europe, this news will have to please the estimated five remaining people in the United States who believe that we didn't spend too much on economic stimulus, that we, in fact, spent too little.
OPINION
By TIM ROWLAND | timr@herald-mail.com | March 25, 2012
Disputes over public spending and public projects are as old as the republic itself, so the Washington County Commissioners aren't breaking any new ground by revisiting the topic. Back when people really believed in limited federal government (in 1800, Ron Paul would have looked like Barney Frank) lawmakers frowned on the thought of the federal government doing so much as grading a road. But not all lawmakers. If you disdain a massive federal government with its massive outlays of cash and its nose under every commercial tent, you might want to blame the Great Lakes and, while you're at it, beavers.
OPINION
December 12, 2011
“The article concerning the reorganization at the state prison, maybe the reporter should have asked Mr. Maynard or Erin Julius how much is this going to cost the taxpayers. I mean, it's not going to be done for free, because you're going to have to redo all the letterheads on the papers, have to do new signage, vehicle identification stickers, uniforms are going to have to be changed.” - Washington County “This is to the caller from Boonsboro complaining about seeing dead deer in The Herald-Mail.
NEWS
By ANDREW SCHOTZ | andrews@herald-mail.com | October 20, 2011
Editor's note: This is one in an occasional series of profiles about candidates running for election in the 6th Congressional District. While working on U.S. Senate candidate Jim Rutledge's campaign last year, Robert Coblentz became a Republican. Coblentz said he heard Rutledge interviewed on the radio, liked his conservative views and decided to help him. He was an independent voter, but decided that the Republican Party matched his values and principles. Rutledge lost a Republican primary, but won Washington County.
NEWS
By RICHARD F. BELISLE | richardb@herald-mail.com | December 8, 2010
The biggest and most expensive issue facing the Eastern Panhandle will be the region’s role in the cleanup of the Chesapeake Bay, a state senator told those gathered at a legislative forum Wednesday. New federal Environmental Protection Agency rules could cost area counties from $180 million to $240 million in wastewater plant upgrades, state Sen. Herb Snyder, D-Jefferson/Berkeley, told about 65 Jefferson County Chamber of Commerce members and guests attending the event at the Clarion Hotel and Conference Center.
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