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NEWS
by DAVE McMILLION | June 5, 2002
charlestown@herald-mail.com CHARLES TOWN, W.Va. - Oral arguments that were to be presented to the state Supreme Court of Appeals today over an appeal to a proposal to tear down the former Jefferson County Jail have been postponed until Oct. 9, lawyers in the case said Tuesday. The oral arguments were postponed so the high court can study a referendum-related issue regarding demolition of county buildings, said Tom Michael, who is representing two local residents who are trying to save the jail.
NEWS
By MATTHEW UMSTEAD | matthew.umstead@herald-mail.com | July 6, 2012
With the last Blue Ridge Community and Technical College classes held at Berkeley County's government building in Martinsburg over, the school's move to a new campus is slated to begin on July 23. The first classes on the college's new main campus at 13650 Apple Harvest Drive west of Interstate 81 are set to begin Aug. 20, Leslie See, vice president of enrollment management at Blue Ridge CTC, told the Berkeley County Council on Thursday. The college received permission from the council to hang temporary banners announcing the move outside the soon-to-be-vacated main campus at 400 W. Stephen St. in Martinsburg.
NEWS
by BOB MAGINNIS | June 6, 2002
The West Virginia Supreme Court, which had been expected to hear arguments on the fate of the old Jefferson County Jail yesterday, postponed the hearing until Oct. 9. The delay is an opportunity for demolition opponents to build public support for some productive re-use of the old structure. The 1917 jail is adjacent to the old county courthouse and the county commissioners want to tear it down to build two or three new courtrooms. That plan is opposed by JC PASH - Jefferson County Preservation Alliance to Save Our Heritage - which says the structure is historically significant because it played a key role in ending the "Mine Wars" of the early 1900s.
NEWS
December 1, 2009
Editor's note: The Herald-Mail invites readers to answer poll questions on www.herald-mail.com. Readers also may submit comments when voting. A sampling of edited reader comments will run on The Herald-Mail's Opinion page on Tuesday, Thursday and Sunday. The question posted Friday was: Should nativity scenes be permitted on government property during the holiday season? Poll results: Yes -- 930 votes (87 percent) No -- 135 votes (13 percent) o "This country was founded on freedom of religion, not freedom from religion.
NEWS
By MARLO BARNHART | April 18, 2000
Stephen Arthur Lowe, who is serving a five-year prison sentence for allowing his children to live in squalor, doesn't face more jail time for threatening to blow up a government building. Lowe, now 51, was given probation before judgment last Thursday for threatening verbally to explode a destructive device in a building, specifically the Washington County Department of Social Services. The sentencing occurred in Washington County District Court before retired Judge Darrow Glaser, according to court records.
NEWS
December 30, 1997
Editorial - Is protest outlawed? Following the arrest of a black man who claimed he was being denied a county job because of his race, Washington County Human Resources Director Alan Davis says the county needs to revamp its affirmative action program. We suggest that the county commissioners first need to decide what's an acceptable method of protesting their policies, because the one they're using now is too restrictive. Fifty-three-year-old Lawrence Freeman was arrested Dec. 23 as he sat on a bench in front of the Washington County Administration Building at 100 W. Washington St., holding up a sheet of paper that said, "Washington County Commissioners won't hire black men. " It's important to emphasize that Freeman wasn't inside when arrested and wasn't interfering with any functions of the county government.
NEWS
by TIM ROWLAND | January 17, 2006
Add one more to the growing list of "it could only happen in Hagerstown. " In fact, this could safely be nominated as an entry for the "Quintessential Hagerstown Moment" award, without fear of embarrassing itself. Look, I know everything comes to Hagerstown a little late - fads, fashion, cuisine, shoe styles, Robert Ehrlich. It's like Mark Twain said of the Midwest: When the apocalypse comes, you'll want to be in Cincinnati, because it will happen six months later there. " But an anthrax threat?
NEWS
By ROBERT SNYDER | April 23, 2006
MARTINSBURG, W.VA. City Hall can be bought, and for a cool $1.2 million. Not the current City Hall at North Queen Street in Martinsburg, but the 10,400-square-foot building around the corner and a few blocks down on West King Street that served as the city's government building for more than 50 years, and until last year housed software manufacturer Butterfly.net, which since has relocated to Los Angeles. The three-story building, which sits in the shadow of the old federal courthouse at 224-226 W. King St., was constructed in 1908 and served as Martinsburg's City Hall until the current municipal building was constructed in the mid-1980s, according to Keith Hammersla, head of reference and information services at the Martinsburg-Berkeley County Public Library.
NEWS
by PEPPER BALLARD | June 7, 2005
pepperb@herald-mail.com HAGERSTOWN - After temporarily trading in his service weapon to sling an M-4 over his shoulder, Hagerstown Police Department Chief Arthur Smith has absorbed Afghanistan's culture and its heat while working in a police-related position overseas. Smith, 54, in January took a temporary leave of absence from his police chief duties to work as a contractor in Afghanistan. The position is through a firm that has a contract with the U.S. Department of State, he said.
NEWS
April 8, 2009
"This is to those prisoners out there on the Sharpsburg Pike who are demanding that they be given food that meets their religious diets. Well, now, you sweet things. If we had known you were coming, we'd have baked you a cake. " - Hagerstown "Give driver's licenses to illegal immigrants in Maryland? Stupid, stupid, stupid. " - Hagerstown "On this business of special food for the prisoners, if I was a warden or powers-to-be, I would feed them baked beans three times a day. But then again, I guess they would raise a stink about that.
ARTICLES BY DATE
OPINION
By GEORGE MICHAEL | July 30, 2012
In a recent speech, President Obama said that government creates jobs, not individuals.  He belittled the efforts of most business endeavors by saying, “If you've got a business - you didn't build that.  Somebody else made that happen.” The President added: “You didn't get there on your own. I'm always struck by people who think, well, it must be because I was just so smart.” Personally, I am more often struck by politicians who are...
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NEWS
By MATTHEW UMSTEAD | matthew.umstead@herald-mail.com | July 6, 2012
With the last Blue Ridge Community and Technical College classes held at Berkeley County's government building in Martinsburg over, the school's move to a new campus is slated to begin on July 23. The first classes on the college's new main campus at 13650 Apple Harvest Drive west of Interstate 81 are set to begin Aug. 20, Leslie See, vice president of enrollment management at Blue Ridge CTC, told the Berkeley County Council on Thursday. The college received permission from the council to hang temporary banners announcing the move outside the soon-to-be-vacated main campus at 400 W. Stephen St. in Martinsburg.
NEWS
December 1, 2009
Editor's note: The Herald-Mail invites readers to answer poll questions on www.herald-mail.com. Readers also may submit comments when voting. A sampling of edited reader comments will run on The Herald-Mail's Opinion page on Tuesday, Thursday and Sunday. The question posted Friday was: Should nativity scenes be permitted on government property during the holiday season? Poll results: Yes -- 930 votes (87 percent) No -- 135 votes (13 percent) o "This country was founded on freedom of religion, not freedom from religion.
NEWS
April 8, 2009
"This is to those prisoners out there on the Sharpsburg Pike who are demanding that they be given food that meets their religious diets. Well, now, you sweet things. If we had known you were coming, we'd have baked you a cake. " - Hagerstown "Give driver's licenses to illegal immigrants in Maryland? Stupid, stupid, stupid. " - Hagerstown "On this business of special food for the prisoners, if I was a warden or powers-to-be, I would feed them baked beans three times a day. But then again, I guess they would raise a stink about that.
NEWS
By MATTHEW UMSTEAD | February 14, 2008
A Berryville, Va., man on Wednesday bought a Berkeley County government building at auction for $500,000. "I've been looking at it for a couple months now," Vince Petti said after County Commissioner Ronald K. Collins agreed to Petti's winning bid for the three-story brick building at 205 E. King St. The pending sale, which is expected to be finalized in 30 days, comes after Berkeley County Schools Superintendent Manny Arvon in December indicated...
NEWS
By ROBERT SNYDER | April 23, 2006
MARTINSBURG, W.VA. City Hall can be bought, and for a cool $1.2 million. Not the current City Hall at North Queen Street in Martinsburg, but the 10,400-square-foot building around the corner and a few blocks down on West King Street that served as the city's government building for more than 50 years, and until last year housed software manufacturer Butterfly.net, which since has relocated to Los Angeles. The three-story building, which sits in the shadow of the old federal courthouse at 224-226 W. King St., was constructed in 1908 and served as Martinsburg's City Hall until the current municipal building was constructed in the mid-1980s, according to Keith Hammersla, head of reference and information services at the Martinsburg-Berkeley County Public Library.
NEWS
by TIM ROWLAND | January 17, 2006
Add one more to the growing list of "it could only happen in Hagerstown. " In fact, this could safely be nominated as an entry for the "Quintessential Hagerstown Moment" award, without fear of embarrassing itself. Look, I know everything comes to Hagerstown a little late - fads, fashion, cuisine, shoe styles, Robert Ehrlich. It's like Mark Twain said of the Midwest: When the apocalypse comes, you'll want to be in Cincinnati, because it will happen six months later there. " But an anthrax threat?
NEWS
by PEPPER BALLARD | June 7, 2005
pepperb@herald-mail.com HAGERSTOWN - After temporarily trading in his service weapon to sling an M-4 over his shoulder, Hagerstown Police Department Chief Arthur Smith has absorbed Afghanistan's culture and its heat while working in a police-related position overseas. Smith, 54, in January took a temporary leave of absence from his police chief duties to work as a contractor in Afghanistan. The position is through a firm that has a contract with the U.S. Department of State, he said.
NEWS
by DON AINES | January 3, 2005
chambersburg@herald-mail.com CHAMBERSBURG, PA. - Improvements to the security of Franklin County government buildings in 2005 will focus on their interiors, according to county officials. In late 2003 and early 2004, a proximity card system and closed-circuit television cameras were installed at the courthouse annex on Lincoln Way East, the Administrative Annex on North Second Street and the Human Services Building on Franklin Farm Lane. The proximity card system limits access at some building entrances and mechanical rooms to employees with the cards that contain a computer chip that is scanned by a reader at the doorways.
NEWS
by BOB MAGINNIS | June 6, 2002
The West Virginia Supreme Court, which had been expected to hear arguments on the fate of the old Jefferson County Jail yesterday, postponed the hearing until Oct. 9. The delay is an opportunity for demolition opponents to build public support for some productive re-use of the old structure. The 1917 jail is adjacent to the old county courthouse and the county commissioners want to tear it down to build two or three new courtrooms. That plan is opposed by JC PASH - Jefferson County Preservation Alliance to Save Our Heritage - which says the structure is historically significant because it played a key role in ending the "Mine Wars" of the early 1900s.
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