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Germs

NEWS
June 21, 2013
Walnut Street Community Health Center will provide free dental sealants to Washington County children as part of a collaborative effort between the center and the Washington County Health Department, with funding support of nearly $10,000 from the Office of Oral Health of the Maryland Department of Health and Mental Hygiene. Dental sealants, which can cost up to $60 per tooth, are thin coatings that are applied to the pits and grooves on the chewing surfaces of the permanent back teeth.
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NEWS
By KIMBERLY YAKOWSKI | October 10, 1999
An 8,000 gallon gasoline tanker that overturned in an accident last fall is no longer useful for transportation but provides an excellent training resource for the Washington County Special Operations Team. The AC&T tanker was donated to the county by the Hagerstown company and is stored at the Hagerstown Fire Department Training Center. The gasoline truck will be used by rescuers from throughout Maryland during a two-day training seminar held at the fire center Oct. 16 and 17. Funded by state grants, the free seminar will be the first of its kind in Maryland, said organizer John Bentley, deputy coordinator of the special operations team.
NEWS
by JENNIFER FITCH | May 17, 2007
WAYNESBORO, Pa. - When Caitlyn Hill needed supplies for her science fair project, she and her father turned to the World Wide Web. It was on eBay where they found a key component called capsaicin. The chemical compound is what makes chili peppers hot, Caitlyn explained. Capsaicin apparently also made the 14-year-old's project hot, earning her the title of "champion" at the Franklin Science and Technology Fair last month. Caitlyn, a freshman at Waynesboro Area Senior High School, had a feeling she would win something, but wasn't anticipating the title just one step away from her ultimate goal of grand champion.
LIFESTYLE
By MARIE GILBERT | marieg@herald-mail.com | August 18, 2013
It's that time of the year again, when children head off to school for lessons in reading, writing and arithmetic. The upcoming weeks will include essays, history projects and pages of problem solving. But parents will have their share of homework, too. They'll be studying their children's sleeping habits, calculating how much weight is being carried in backpacks and doing a little scientific research on germs. It's all part of helping kids stay healthy so they can learn and grow.
NEWS
by JULIE E. GREENE | April 3, 2006
One thing you shouldn't keep in your medicine cabinet is medicine, says Dr. Greg Lyon-Loftus with Mont Alto (Pa.) Family Practice. Changes in heat, humidity and light can destroy the potency of pill or liquid medicines - changes that frequently occur in a bathroom, Lyon-Loftus says. He recommends storing medicine you're keeping for a long time in the refrigerator, which sees little light and usually maintains consistent temperature and humidity. Medicine that will be used quickly can be stored in a linen closet or the bedroom, but away from children.
NEWS
By ERIN CUNNINGHAM | January 17, 2008
SHARPSBURG ? For a second day, dozens of Sharpsburg Elementary School students and staff were absent from school and said to be suffering from flu-like symptoms. Washington County Health Department spokesman Rod MacRae said he is not aware of similar problems elsewhere in Washington County. School remained open Wednesday, when about 40 students and four staff members were absent, and again Thursday, when an additional 10 were said to be sick. MacRae described the illness as "respiratory" and said that symptoms include fever, cough, sore throat and nasal or chest congestion.
NEWS
By ERIN CUNNINGHAM | January 18, 2008
SHARPSBURG - For a second day, dozens of Sharpsburg Elementary School students and staff were absent from school and said to be suffering from flulike symptoms. Washington County Health Department spokesman Rod MacRae said he is not aware of similar problems elsewhere in Washington County. School remained open Wednesday, when about 40 students and four staff members were absent, and again Thursday, when an additional 10 were said to be sick. MacRae described the illness as "respiratory" and said that symptoms include fever, cough, sore throat and nasal or chest congestion.
NEWS
January 12, 2001
Thumbs up, thumbs down 1/13 To Maryland Gov. Parris Glendeing, for his proposal to boost state spending in a way that could bring Washinton County an additional $3.1 million for education. Go for it! To Charlie Rowe, a Washington County Big Brother for 20 who also barbecues 7,000 chickens a year for charitable causes. No wonder he was cited by the Baltimore Ravens as an outstanding volunteer in their "Community Quarterback" promotion. To the Pentagon experts who wrote a report saying U.S. agriculture is vulnerable to germ warfare attacks.
NEWS
BY LAURA ERNDE | May 6, 2002
By LAURA ERNDE laurae@herald-mail.com They saw X-rays, bedpans and blood pressure cuffs, but the Salem Avenue Elementary first-graders touring Washington County Hospital seemed most fascinated with the tonsils. Yes, real tonsils. Once lodged in someone's throat, now filling up a jelly-sized jar. "This is what your tonsils look like. They're real big because they're filled with those bad germs sometimes," said Carolyn Carder, lab manager at the hospital. Some of the students grimaced.
NEWS
By DAN DEARTH | September 9, 2009
HAGERSTOWN -- Washington County Public Schools on Wednesday reported its second case of H1N1 flu in 10 days. School system spokesman Richard Wright said officials learned Wednesday that a student at Rockland Woods Elementary School off Sharpsburg Pike south of Hagerstown contracted the virus also known as swine flu. The first case was confirmed Aug. 31 at Conococheague Elementary School. Wright said a letter was sent home with Rockland Woods students Wednesday to notify parents of the precautions that school officials are taking.
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