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NEWS
By DAN DEARTH | August 24, 2009
HAGERSTOWN -- Officials from Washington County Public Schools and the Washington County Health Department are offering free seasonal flu vaccinations to students in grades kindergarten through five. The vaccinations will not protect children from swine flu. John Davidson, director of student services for Washington County Public Schools, said vaccinations will be administered from Oct. 19 to 26. He said the vaccinations would not be given without parental consent. The vaccinations will be administered as a mist through both nostrils because most children are afraid of needles, said Susan Parks, director of community health nursing for the Washington County Health Department.
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LIFESTYLE
Lynn Little | February 8, 2011
Staying healthy can start in the kitchen. Handwashing is recognized by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)  as one of the most important means of preventing germs from spreading. Here are some tips:  Wash hands frequently in hot, soapy water.  Wash hands before and after handling raw and cooked foods.  Use separate cutting boards for different kinds of foods.Slice and dice vegetables on one board and cut up raw meat, fish and poultry on another.
NEWS
Lynn Little | September 18, 2012
Join the Clean Hands Coalition and celebrate Clean Hands Week, which began Tuesday and will continue through Monday, Sept. 24. Handwashing is important for food safety, disease prevention and personal health. Keeping hands clean is one of the most important steps we can take to avoid getting sick and spreading germs to others.  When we forget to wash our hands, or don't wash them properly, we can spread germs to other people or give them to ourselves by touching our eyes, mouth, nose or cuts on our bodies.
NEWS
by KRISTIN WILSON | February 17, 2006
kristinw@herald-mail.com Before Karen Ingram's fourth-grade Clear Spring Elementary School students head for the lunchroom, she makes sure each child has lathered up with antibacterial hand sanitizer to kill any cooties lingering on the 9-year-olds hands. Making sure hands are squeaky clean before eating is crucial to help fight off winter colds. And, as it turns out, mom was right: Covering your mouth when you cough and getting a good night's sleep also are prime disease stoppers.
LIFESTYLE
By ALICIA NOTARIANNI | alnotarianni@aol.com | December 17, 2010
"Zip your coat. Put that hat on your head. You're gonna catch a cold. " Rare is the mother who hasn't uttered these words during the rush out the door. Shirlee Imes, 55, of Hagerstown, certainly has. She is the mother of 11. If she doesn't stand guard at the door, Imes said, one of her children inevitably tries to sneak out in just a sweatshirt. Excuses abound. "It's not cool to wear a heavy coat. " "They don't give us enough locker space to put our coat and backpack in. " "I'll miss my bus if I have to go back to my locker to get my coat.
NEWS
Lynn Little | March 5, 2013
The trend of swapping disposable grocery bags for reusable cloth and plastic-lined bags has become a popular choice. Reusable bags reduce waste but there are food safety concerns to consider.  Certain foods, such as raw produce, meat, poultry and fish might contain bacteria that cause foodborne illness. The fabric or materials in reusable grocery bags can become contaminated with germs like Salmonella or E. coli from foods or other items. These germs could then cross-contaminate other foods and nonfood items.
NEWS
By LYNN LITTLE | September 19, 2007
Join the Clean Hands Coalition and celebrate Clean Hands Week this week. Washing your hands is is the single most important act you can do to prevent getting sick and making others sick. Handwashing reduces the spread of germs and is important for food safety, disease prevention and personal health. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, nearly 22 million school days are lost due to the common cold. Some viruses and bacteria can live from 20 minutes up to 2 hours or more on surfaces such as cafeteria tables, doorknobs and desks.
NEWS
From NAPSA | November 9, 2009
There may be a surprising way to help keep germs out of the home: Add ceramic tile. The tile, with its broad range of sizes, textures, colors and finishes, is easily adaptable to most any home's attributes and palette. But it can also serve as a type of germ repellent. It's chemically inert, inorganic, and features anti-microbial attributes-meaning the tile not only repels mold and mildew in damp areas of a house such as the kitchen or bathroom, but it also won't collect dust, dirt and allergens.
NEWS
January 23, 2006
Time management tips and weekly meeting invitation for caregivers MARTINSBURG, W.Va. - Berkeley Senior Services' Adult Day Services will have a Dutch-treat lunch out from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. Friday, Feb. 3, at Shoney's, off King Street (Interstate 81, exit 13). Caregivers can listen to a presentation by Brighter Tomorrow Counseling Center's Barbara Ehrenburg. Her topic will be "Tips for Time Management. " Also, Berkeley Senior Services' Adult Day Services will sponsor a free weekly Caregiver Supper Club from 6 to 8 p.m. Tuesdays at Berkeley Senior Center, 217 N. High St. Caregivers can bring a "sack supper" and eat while professionals from the community provide information on various aspects of care-giving.
NEWS
May 4, 2009
Stay informed. The CDC Web site ( www.cdc.gov/swineflu ) will be updated regularly as information becomes available. Influenza is thought to spread mainly person to person through coughing or sneezing of infected people. Take everyday actions to stay healthy. Cover your nose and mouth with a tissue when you cough or sneeze. Throw the tissue in the trash after you use it. Wash your hands often with soap and water, especially after you cough or sneeze. Alcohol-based hands cleaners are also effective.
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