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NEWS
by SCOTT BUTKI | December 13, 2004
scottb@herald-mail.com HAGERSTOWN - Washington County Hospital is hoping patients and visitors will learn what is being called "respiratory etiquette," taking actions to deter the spread of colds and respiratory illnesses to others, said Kathy Morrisey, hospital director of infection control. In recent months, the hospital has put up a sign asking people with cold or flu-like symptoms not to go to the hospital unless absolutely necessary, she said. "We are asking people to voluntarily decide if they really should stay home and not visit someone in the hospital if they are coming just to visit," Morrisey said.
NEWS
By BRIGITTE GREWE / Pulse Correspondent | October 9, 2007
Although it's been hot the past couple weeks, those long, warm summer vacation days are long gone. There are no more days spent lying beside the pool, absorbing all the vitamin D you can, playing sports outside and jumping sprinklers. Now it's time to welcome fall, and everything wonderful it brings. I love fall. It's the best season. Summer has too many bugs for my taste, spring gives me allergies and winter is cold. Fall is just right. Except for one thing. Cold and flu season.
NEWS
By TIFFANY ARNOLD | November 9, 2009
The power to prevent disease lies in your hands - if you wash them properly. Germ prevention has become top-of-mind for many who are trying to avoid getting sick, as H1N1 and the seasonal flu make their rounds. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention estimate that Americans are not washing their hands often enough or well enough and may be transmitting up to 80 percent of all infections by their hands. So The Herald-Mail sought out expert hand-washer, Kathy Morrisey, director of infection control at Washington County Hospital for a primer in proper hand washing.
NEWS
by ANDREA ROWLAND | January 26, 2004
andrear@herald-mail.com The little poem that veteran kindergarten teacher Trudy Mackrell-Metz shares with her students every year has nothing to do with reading, writing or arithmetic, but it's one of the most important lessons they'll ever learn: "When you cough or when you sneeze, cover your face with a tissue, please. " Mackrell-Metz said she reinforces the lesson with her kindergarten students at Clear Spring Elementary throughout the year. She keeps a box of tissues in the center of each student work table, reminds the youngsters to use the tissues every time they cough or sneeze, to hold onto used tissues until they throw them away, and then to thoroughly wash their hands with warm water and soap.
NEWS
by JULIE E. GREENE | December 5, 2004
julieg@herald-mail.com Like hundreds of children at Robinwood Medical Center on Saturday, Hagerstown sisters Kelsey and Sarah Winters were given new teddy bears and a lesson in hygiene. The girls visited the purple plastic Buddy Bear, which showed them the "germs" still on their hands even after they washed their hands. "You have to wash really, really hard, front and back," Kathy Morrisey told the girls. The hand-washing lesson was one of many activities for children attending the Teddy Bear Clinic, part of the Festival of Trees fund-raiser at Robinwood Medical Center.
NEWS
By ALICIA NOTARIANNI | August 8, 2009
HAGERSTOWN -- Ryan Montes thought he had washed his hands well. He used soap and water, rubbed and rinsed. But then he placed them under a black light inside a purple, hard-plastic box to determine how well he had done. The results? Germy. "I was surprised," said Ryan, 10, of Hagerstown. "I learned that I need to wash more carefully, up to my wrists and between my fingers so I won't have germs on my hands. " Ryan was not viewing actual germs. Rather, he was seeing glowing lotion meant to represent germs under the light of a GlitterBug View Box. Tracy Knable of the Washington County Health Department Environmental Health Division used the device to teach hand-washing awareness Saturday at the Walnut Street Community Health Center Health Fair.
NEWS
by Lisa Tedrick Prejean | September 3, 2004
First-day jitters are gone, seating assignments are set, and children are getting reacquainted with friends. The first week of school brings adjustments and oh-so-much paperwork. It's bound to cause upheaval in even the most organized of homes. We get so busy filling out forms, picking up and dropping off our kids, packing lunches and checking to see if homework is done that it's easy to forget about the most important thing. We forget to listen to and talk with our children.
NEWS
By CATHERINE HALL / Special to The Herald-Mail | May 15, 2009
You can't cough in public right now without strange looks from passersby. This just goes to show that even though swine flu hasn't reached our rural region, worries still abound. And children are no exception. With unfamiliar words and concepts being used by adults - words like epidemic and pandemic - children might need help discerning fact from fiction regarding swine flu. Talking to kids about prevention without causing fear can be a tricky situation. To help, the National Association of School Nurses has issued a resource document for parents to help them share information about swine flu with their children.
NEWS
Bill Kohler | November 20, 2011
Handshake (noun) - A gripping and shaking of each other's hand in greeting, farewell, agreement, etc. My father had a great handshake. J. Thomas Balistrere had a great handshake. Anthony Ceddia, the former president of Shippensburg (Pa.) University, had a solid handshake. Your preacher, the president of the United States, an old buddy when you see each other for the first time in years. Good, solid handshakes. I always felt that a handshake was a sign of becoming a man. As a teenager and college student, I always wanted to be considered a man, even though I acted like an immature imbecile at times.
NEWS
by JULIE E. GREENE | May 30, 2005
julieg@herald-mail.com Warmer days can sometimes lead to hot-headed actions, falls from physical activities or injuries from do-it-yourself jobs around the house. Here are 10 common injuries and what to do, according to Dr. Lucy Folino, who works at Urgent Care Center at Robinwood Medical Center and Express Care at Washington County Hospital. Keep in mind, each case should be considered separately. Not every "minor" injury can be treated at home. Use your best judgment in deciding whether to call 911 or go to the emergency department.
ARTICLES BY DATE
OPINION
January 23, 2013
Being a guy, I have taken a number of guy-endorsed precautions to guard against the flu. For example, until further notice, the five-second rule governing the edibility of food that has hit the floor had been modified into a three-second rule. There are other important things we do as well, such as putting our computer keyboard in the dishwasher. We have imperfect understandings of whether or not microwaves kill germs, but it never hurts to try. But as a teen, I remember we lived by similar “sanitation of convenience” rules that mostly involved self-imposed solitary confinement.
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NEWS
Bill Kohler | November 20, 2011
Handshake (noun) - A gripping and shaking of each other's hand in greeting, farewell, agreement, etc. My father had a great handshake. J. Thomas Balistrere had a great handshake. Anthony Ceddia, the former president of Shippensburg (Pa.) University, had a solid handshake. Your preacher, the president of the United States, an old buddy when you see each other for the first time in years. Good, solid handshakes. I always felt that a handshake was a sign of becoming a man. As a teenager and college student, I always wanted to be considered a man, even though I acted like an immature imbecile at times.
NEWS
By KATHY MORRISEY / Special to The Herald-Mail | April 5, 2010
What's the best defense against germs? Soap and water. It sounds simple, but washing your hands thoroughly and frequently is the single best way to protect your body from germs that cause infection. Wash your hands after coughing, sneezing or using the rest room, and before preparing or eating food at a minimum. When soap and water aren't readily available, use an alcohol-based hand sanitizer. In addition to keeping your hands clean, there are other important steps you can take to protect your body from infections.
NEWS
By TIFFANY ARNOLD | November 9, 2009
The power to prevent disease lies in your hands - if you wash them properly. Germ prevention has become top-of-mind for many who are trying to avoid getting sick, as H1N1 and the seasonal flu make their rounds. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention estimate that Americans are not washing their hands often enough or well enough and may be transmitting up to 80 percent of all infections by their hands. So The Herald-Mail sought out expert hand-washer, Kathy Morrisey, director of infection control at Washington County Hospital for a primer in proper hand washing.
NEWS
By ALICIA NOTARIANNI | August 8, 2009
HAGERSTOWN -- Ryan Montes thought he had washed his hands well. He used soap and water, rubbed and rinsed. But then he placed them under a black light inside a purple, hard-plastic box to determine how well he had done. The results? Germy. "I was surprised," said Ryan, 10, of Hagerstown. "I learned that I need to wash more carefully, up to my wrists and between my fingers so I won't have germs on my hands. " Ryan was not viewing actual germs. Rather, he was seeing glowing lotion meant to represent germs under the light of a GlitterBug View Box. Tracy Knable of the Washington County Health Department Environmental Health Division used the device to teach hand-washing awareness Saturday at the Walnut Street Community Health Center Health Fair.
NEWS
By CATHERINE HALL / Special to The Herald-Mail | May 15, 2009
You can't cough in public right now without strange looks from passersby. This just goes to show that even though swine flu hasn't reached our rural region, worries still abound. And children are no exception. With unfamiliar words and concepts being used by adults - words like epidemic and pandemic - children might need help discerning fact from fiction regarding swine flu. Talking to kids about prevention without causing fear can be a tricky situation. To help, the National Association of School Nurses has issued a resource document for parents to help them share information about swine flu with their children.
NEWS
By JANET HEIM | October 20, 2008
For Cosmetology Level 1 students at Washington County Technical High School, familiar tools of the trade might be scissors, styling products and a comb. They traded those tools in for something out of the chemistry lab for a recent lesson in infection control and salon ecology. Instructor Marie Bikle had her students take cultures of a variety of surfaces, including the students' work stations in their classroom, door knobs and their shoes. The petri dish germ farms were allowed to grow three to five days, then observed.
NEWS
October 30, 2007
"I agree with the caller about the Mummers Parade being held during the day. It's all about bragging rights. I listened to an Alsatia official say that it's the oldest nighttime parade east of the Mississippi. I'm more concerned about the safety of hundreds of men, women and children, traveling long distances late hours at night to get home. Being the oldest nighttime parade is nothing to brag about. Let's change it to the daytime, and brag about how great a parade it is. " - Hagerstown "I just drove from Dulles Airport to Public Square in Hagerstown.
NEWS
By BRIGITTE GREWE / Pulse Correspondent | October 9, 2007
Although it's been hot the past couple weeks, those long, warm summer vacation days are long gone. There are no more days spent lying beside the pool, absorbing all the vitamin D you can, playing sports outside and jumping sprinklers. Now it's time to welcome fall, and everything wonderful it brings. I love fall. It's the best season. Summer has too many bugs for my taste, spring gives me allergies and winter is cold. Fall is just right. Except for one thing. Cold and flu season.
NEWS
by TIFFANY ARNOLD | October 30, 2006
Every office has one: The unfortunate soul who spends the shift continually sneezing, and coughing into a tissue - or, worse, in his bare hands - at his desk. This is the same guy you hope has not recently borrowed your stapler, used your telephone or touched your keyboard. Local health officials said this is the guy who probably should have called in sick. When it comes to avoiding workplace illnesses, hand sanitizer isn't the only line of defense. Some of the burden goes to the ones doing the coughing and sneezing.
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