Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: HeraldMail HomeCollectionsGasoline Tax
IN THE NEWS

Gasoline Tax

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
February 24, 2004
In life and especially in politics, timing is everything. That's why a coalition of groups pushing for a state gasoline tax increase in Pennsylvania may be out of luck, at least until after the November elections. Former Gov. Tom Ridge won a 3.5-cent increase in 1997, as well as a 50 percent increase in vehicle registration fees. But gasoline prices were dropping at the time. Now The Associated Press reports that gasoline prices have gone up 10 percent since December. An increase that wouldn't be hard to take when prices are falling might spark anger from voters upset by rising costs.
OPINION
February 27, 2012
Gasoline tax hike is an ill-conceived idea To the editor: The proposal to raise the gasoline tax is an ill-conceived idea. The cost of maintaining our highways and bridges is driven up by poor administrative policies. Policies that affect the maintenance and construction of our roads need to be evaluated for efficiencies of cost. The roads used to get products to market and people to their place of employment are an integral part of commerce. The increased cost of gasoline will drive up the cost of all products for the consumer.
NEWS
December 15, 1998
Before the first meeting of a group of business and government leaders appointed to study whether there's a need to raise Maryland's gasoline tax, newly-elected state representatives Chris Shank and Alex Mooney have declared their opposition to a hike. We too have reservations about any boost that funds an endless number of new road projects based on the assumption that gasoline will never be more than $1 a gallon again. Our fear, in fact, is that when gasoline does go up again, voters will demand more mass transit options, leaving millions of dollars worth of asphalt and concrete, unused and unrecoverable, in the ground.
NEWS
February 2, 1999
Realizing that they need to prove that there's a need for more transportation funding in the middle of a booming state economy, Maryland leaders, including Gov. Parris Glendening, will delay a proposal to hike the state's gasoline tax for at least a year. It's a move the makes sense, if state officials want to raise the level of debate on this issue. So far we've heard three positions. The first is that there's no need for any additional money, despite a growing list of road and transportation projects.
NEWS
by GREGORY T. SIMMONS | January 27, 2004
gregs@herald-mail.com The city of Hagerstown will leave some city positions unfilled and probably will increase fees and delay construction projects to close a gap of more than $1.8 million in next year's budget plan, city officials said Monday. The city's budget must be balanced when it is passed in late May. City Finance Director Alfred Martin said a tax rate increase may be needed. "That's certainly one of the options that may need to be considered," Martin said.
NEWS
January 13, 1999
Maryland officials facing a future shortfall of revenues for road and bridge projects believe that 1999 is the now-or-never year to find new sources of cash. But as they discuss their options, we hope they find a place in the state's plans for mass transit. Long before the 1999 session opened, Maryland Chamber President Champe McCulloch predicted that lawmakers would act to beef up the state's Transportation Trust Fund, in a way that would prevent mass-transit from eating up too much of the money.
NEWS
by LAURA ERNDE | January 16, 2004
Addressing a gathering of Maryland Chamber of Commerce members Thursday, Senate President Thomas V. Mike Miller and House Speaker Michael E. Busch, D-Anne Arundel, talked about ways to raise money for transportation projects. The Chamber supports a $30 increase in the vehicle registration fee, coupled with a 5-cent increase in the gasoline tax, state Chamber Chairman Bill Roberts said. Miller said he supports a gas tax increase of 5 cents or more. Busch said raising the gas tax would make Maryland uncompetitive with surrounding states.
OPINION
April 20, 2011
Strapped for cash, as always, the Maryland General Assembly increased the sales tax on alcoholic beverages from 6 percent to 9 percent this session. We have less problem with the tax itself, than we do with the fact that, as always, what should be a matter of statewide benefit has been twisted into a none-too-subtle money grab by the metropolitan areas without consideration of the tax’s effect on more rural areas. The alcohol tax hadn’t been raised in decades, and while we doubt proponents’ claims that it will reduce alcohol abuse and underage drinking, this tax hike was probably preferable to some other revenue streams the state might have tapped into.
NEWS
By KAUSTUV BASU | kaustuv.basu@herald-mail.com | June 25, 2013
The gasoline tax in Maryland will increase by about 4 cents a gallon on Monday, part of a series of increase in the tax in the years to come to fund transportation projects in the state. This is the first increase in the state gasoline tax since 1992. The measure, which cleared the Maryland General Assembly earlier this year, will raise the state gas tax by 12.1 cents a gallon by July 2015. Another increase in the state gas tax of 8.1 cents a gallon is possible in 2016, if federal Internet sales tax legislation does not pass, according to the Associated Press.
NEWS
By ANDREW SCHOTZ | andrews@herald-mail.com | January 26, 2012
Discontented lawmakers gathered Thursday for a briefing on the perceived “war on rural Maryland” - and to redouble their commitment to combat it. Sen. E.J. Pipkin, R-Caroline/Cecil/Kent/Queen Anne's, the Senate minority leader, briefed about 15 legislators, focusing on PlanMaryland, the state's new effort at managing growth. The discussion moved to topics such as septic systems, water improvement plans, property rights and gas drilling, as lawmakers aired their dissatisfaction with what they see as unfair urban-centric governance.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By KAUSTUV BASU | kaustuv.basu@herald-mail.com | June 25, 2013
The gasoline tax in Maryland will increase by about 4 cents a gallon on Monday, part of a series of increase in the tax in the years to come to fund transportation projects in the state. This is the first increase in the state gasoline tax since 1992. The measure, which cleared the Maryland General Assembly earlier this year, will raise the state gas tax by 12.1 cents a gallon by July 2015. Another increase in the state gas tax of 8.1 cents a gallon is possible in 2016, if federal Internet sales tax legislation does not pass, according to the Associated Press.
Advertisement
OPINION
January 20, 2013
Residents should speak out against Congress' inaction To the editor: Harry Reid to Obama: “Please ignore Congress and raise the debt ceiling on your own.” I, for one, am not surprised. The 113th Congress is continuing a tradition. They, like past Congresses, are poised to once again abdicate their responsibility under the Constitution. Taxation without representation might have been tyranny in 1775; at all levels of government in 2013, taxation and unrestrained spending with representation is an abomination.
OPINION
April 3, 2012
“Obamacare, otherwise known as affordable health care, can save seniors hundreds of dollars a year on prescription drugs, and gives them access to preventative care that is saving their lives. Just ask me; I was in the doughnut hole last year, and I was saved hundreds of dollars. And this health care means never having to worry about getting sick and running up against a lifetime ... It gives the parents comfort in knowing their kids can stay on their insurance until they're 26, and this pre-existing condition, like ear infection, will never compromise their child's coverage.
OPINION
February 22, 2012
“What a wonderful article in Sunday's paper by Lloyd Waters, concerning 'We remember the outhouse.' Perhaps if we return to those days, our country would be in better shape. We survived then and could survive now. No flush tax, no gun control and no gasoline tax. When the government needs more money, all they think is taxing us more, and what are they doing with the money?” - Hagerstown “Why do we need someone from Michigan to tell us how to park in Hagerstown?
NEWS
By ANDREW SCHOTZ | andrews@herald-mail.com | January 26, 2012
Discontented lawmakers gathered Thursday for a briefing on the perceived “war on rural Maryland” - and to redouble their commitment to combat it. Sen. E.J. Pipkin, R-Caroline/Cecil/Kent/Queen Anne's, the Senate minority leader, briefed about 15 legislators, focusing on PlanMaryland, the state's new effort at managing growth. The discussion moved to topics such as septic systems, water improvement plans, property rights and gas drilling, as lawmakers aired their dissatisfaction with what they see as unfair urban-centric governance.
OPINION
January 16, 2012
How great is this? The Maryland General Assembly session isn't even a week old and already the fighting has begun. Even better, the fighting hasn't even involved any of the lawmakers yet. This is hard to figure. I mean, isn't this the point where the Donoraptor and Shankasaurus are usually up on their hind feet raging at each other across the primeval swamp that is Annapolis? But no. They've even been agreeing on some policy matters of late, which kind of weirds me out. Instead, it seems as if we have two virtual delegations whose goals are basically to defeat each other's goals.
NEWS
By ANDREW SCHOTZ | andrews@herald-mail.com | January 11, 2012
Word of a possible state sales-tax increase added a dose of reality Wednesday to the fanfare of the opening day of the Maryland General Assembly's 2012 session. Gov. Martin O'Malley said that he's considering proposing another penny on the state's sales tax, increasing it from 6 percent to 7 percent. O'Malley, a Democrat, said the state has to figure out how to fill gaps in the state's operating budget, its Transportation Trust Fund, and water and wastewater infrastructure. Many legislators are expecting the governor to propose increases in the state's gasoline tax and the tax on sewer and septic use this year.
NEWS
By ANDREW SCHOTZ | andrews@herald-mail.com | January 7, 2012
Money and marriage are on the minds of Washington County's state lawmakers heading to Annapolis. So are foreclosed properties, virtual schools, petition privacy, parole and probation violators, and Washington County's proposed senior center. With the 2012 Maryland General Assembly session set to begin Wednesday, a majority of Washington County's delegation anticipates state budget negotiations and a battle over legalizing same-sex marriage taking up much of the legislature's time and attention.
NEWS
By ANDREW SCHOTZ | andrews@herald-mail.com | January 6, 2012
Several local business and government officials met privately at Fountain Head Country Club on Wednesday to discuss what might happen if the state raises its gasoline tax. Hagerstown Councilman Lewis C. Metzner said Thursday that the meeting was meant to get local people and groups on the same page, because a gas-tax increase is a strong possibility, and additional revenue will go elsewhere if Washington County doesn't seek its share. Lawmakers in Annapolis considered raising the state's per-gallon gas tax of 23.5 cents last year, and the idea is widely expected to resurface this year.
The Herald-Mail Articles
|