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NEWS
August 19, 2013
What gives a kick to pesto, sass to sauces, and may ward off vampires? Flavorful, healthful garlic. One of the oldest known horticultural crops, garlic can trace its roots back 5,000 years to the ancient Egyptians and Chinese. Since then, it has become favored across the globe for its culinary uses and health benefits. Garlic is ridiculously easy to grow. You plant in the fall and harvest in late June. The wait is the hard part.  So, how do you get started? Garlic likes full sun and rich, crumbly soil.
NEWS
By BOB BATZ Jr. / Pittsburgh Post-Gazette | April 8, 2009
Here is a recipe to consider making for Passover, the eight-day Jewish festival marking the ancient Hebrews' deliverance from slavery in Egypt. This year, Passover begins at sundown today and continues until sundown on April 16. ROASTED GARLIC ASPARAGUS (Tested by the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette) I'd never made asparagus on parchment paper, but this recipe turned out great, and cleanup was a snap. I loved the flavor from the onion powder, which I don't normally use. -- Bob Batz Jr. 1/2 cup extra-virgin olive oil 8 cloves fresh garlic, minced 1 teaspoon onion powder 2 tablespoons fresh finely chopped parsley 2 pounds thin asparagus, ends trimmed Fleur de sel or coarse sea salt Freshly ground black pepper Makes 6 servings.
NEWS
By LYNNE ROSSETTO KASPER / Scripps Howard News Service | July 19, 2009
Dear Lynne: Solve a mystery for me, please. Verjuice -- what is it? I am a pretty sophisticated foodie, but this is a new one. What am I missing and is there a substitute? --Jerry in Lincoln Dear Jerry: Verjuice is the juice of unripe grapes. It can be gently sweet or lean toward tart. Substitute a sweet-tart blend of grape juice and cider vinegar, or fruity white wine with a little vinegar. Use it instead of vinegar in salads (a good way to make salad wine-friendly), use it wherever wine is used for marinades and sauces, and pour it over fruit, or over ice with bubbly water for a summer tonic.
NEWS
September 1, 2004
Grilled Mahi-Mahi with Sweet Onions and Garlic Note: This recipe also good for tuna, sea bass, mackerel, or halibut. 1-1/2 pounds mahi-mahi, sliced 3/4-inch thick (4 servings) 1 large Vidalia, Maui or other sweet onion 5 cloves garlic, thinly sliced 3 tablespoons olive oil 2 tablespoons butter 1/2 teaspoon sugar 3 tablespoons orange juice, (fresh is best) 1/4 teaspoon salt 1/4 teaspoon pepper Peel and slice the onion and garlic cloves as thinly as possible.
NEWS
September 26, 2007
1 tablespoon sliced shallots 1 teaspoon cracked black pepper 1/2 cup white wine 1 cup heavy cream 2 garlic cloves, blanched 4 ounces, arugula Salt and pepper, to taste To blanch garlic, place the cloves in boiling water for 30 seconds. Remove the garlic and place it in ice water for one minute, allowing the garlic to become completely chilled. In a saucepan, cook the shallots and cracked black pepper over low heat until the shallots become translucent. Deglaze the pan with the wine.
NEWS
October 7, 2007
1 pound ground beef or turkey 1 medium onion, coarsely chopped 4 cloves garlic, minced 3 (15-ounce) cans of kidney beans 1 (5-ounce) can of small white beans 1 (15-ounce) can of black beans 1 (15-ounce) can of diced tomatoes 2 tablespoons chili powder 1 tablespoon cumin 1 teaspoon salt 1 teaspoon ground pepper Brown the beef or turkey with the onion and garlic. Put the meat, onion and garlic with juices in a large pot. Add the remaining ingredients and simmer on medium-to-low heat for 30 minutes.
NEWS
September 5, 2007
1/2 stick unsalted butter, melted 2 garlic cloves, finely chopped 12 medium oysters Preheat the grill to medium high. In a small bowl stir together the melted butter and chopped garlic. Set aside. Place the oysters, cup-side (larger shell) down, on the grill. Close the grill and cook 4 to 5 minutes. The oysters will start to open. The shells' fragile edges might sputter and snap, so beware. Once the shells have opened, carefully remove the top shell, trying not to spill the juices inside.
NEWS
February 13, 2007
3 cloves garlic, minced 1 tablespoon olive oil 8 large whole chicken wings 1 tablespoon paprika 1/4 teaspoon cayenne 1 teaspoon dried oregano 1 teaspoon salt 1 teaspoon pepper 1 lime, cut in wedges Mix garlic with olive oil, and let mixture sit for at least 10 minutes so the flavor of the garlic infuses the oil. Then brush wings with the oil. In a large bowl, combine the paprika, cayenne, oregano, salt and pepper, and...
NEWS
February 27, 2008
Start to finish: 12 minutes 5 cups la nueva ropa vieja (3 cups broth and 2 cups meat/vegetable mixture), defrosted if frozen; recipe below 2 cups water 1 can (14 1/2 ounces) diced tomatoes seasoned with onions and garlic (see Cook's note) 1 can (15 ounces) black beans 1 1/2 cups frozen yellow corn kernels Juice from 1/2 lime 2 teaspoons Worcestershire sauce 1 teaspoon sugar 1/2 teaspoon onion powder 1/2 teaspoon garlic powder 1/4 teaspoon black pepper 6 tablespoons crushed baked tortilla chips, or more to taste Optional toppings: shredded Mexican-blend cheese or cheddar, reduced-fat sour cream, avocado chunks Cook's note: Any type of seasoned, diced tomatoes that contain garlic can be used.
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NEWS
August 19, 2013
What gives a kick to pesto, sass to sauces, and may ward off vampires? Flavorful, healthful garlic. One of the oldest known horticultural crops, garlic can trace its roots back 5,000 years to the ancient Egyptians and Chinese. Since then, it has become favored across the globe for its culinary uses and health benefits. Garlic is ridiculously easy to grow. You plant in the fall and harvest in late June. The wait is the hard part.  So, how do you get started? Garlic likes full sun and rich, crumbly soil.
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NEWS
Scott Anderson | Culinary Passion | February 15, 2012
Good day class, today we have a continuation of my celebration to pasta with fresh ingredients. I'm looking at a blank document, but my mind is full of fresh ideas and a cleaned-out fridge filled with few ingredients.  So let me begin by saying that many need to realize that fresh pasta is one of the best ways to enjoy a meal and the freshest pasta I've ever had was made by my college girlfriend's mother.  Mary Scarpino's mother made...
NEWS
Scott Anderson | Culinary Passion | September 25, 2011
The third in the lineup of mother sauces is tomato sauce, which is a generic term for any sauce that is based mainly on tomatoes. Tomato sauce can either be raw or cooked, from a few minutes to several hours. You can use olive oil or rendered bacon fat to create a delicious sauce. Classic variations called for pork or veal bones, and the rest were made from tomatoes and a few additional vegetables. Some of the sauces are pureed to remove the chunky consistency, giving the finished sauce a nice smooth texture, while the remainder is left chunky.
NEWS
By SCOTT C. ANDERSON / Special to The Herald-Mail | August 8, 2010
Traditionally, Caesar salad is made with a coddled egg so it is a lot more complicated than throwing lettuce into a bowl. The flavors are bright and delicate and blend together when you follow these quick and easy steps. Once you taste the fresh salad, I am certain you will forgo the bottle dressing or dry dressing mix when you have the time to prepare this delicious salad. To accent the salad add grilled shrimp, chicken or sliced flank steak to the top and grate on a little more fresh Parmesan or Romano cheese.
NEWS
By LYNNE CHAR BENNETT/San Francisco Chronicle | May 22, 2010
Other than salt and pepper, garlic and onions are the two ingredients that bridge almost all cuisines. Both members of the allium family, they contain volatile sulfurous compounds that contribute aromas as well as flavors to food. Chives, another family member, have a milder, more delicate onion flavor, and garlic chives (also called Chinese chives or Chinese leeks) combine the characteristic aroma and flavor of garlic with the subtlety of chives. Asian markets and some well-stocked supermarkets carry green garlic chives (there is also a pale yellow variety)
NEWS
By LYNNE ROSSETTO KASPER / Scripps Howard News Service | November 4, 2009
Dear Lynne: My fiancee hates making people uncomfortable, so when she's a guest she doesn't say anything about not eating meat. The thing that really upsets her is a whole cooked animal, so Thanksgivings are tough. This is the turnaround Thanksgiving; it's our first as hosts and cooks, and I want her to be the queen for a change. Could you help me with a no-meat celebration dish that won't feel like a sacrifice to our friends? They love her, too, and say they're cool with no turkey, but if truth be told, I know they're anticipating grim eats.
NEWS
By LYNNE ROSSETTO KASPER / Scripps Howard News Service | July 31, 2009
Dear Lynne: We love anchovies and are hunting down new ways of using them. Any thoughts? -- Howie and Doug Dear Howie and Doug: Let me count the ways. Anchovies marry with any form of acid, from vinegars to lemon and lime, which also mutes their impact. Garlic, onion and flavorful fats such as butter and olive oil all work brilliantly with anchovies. They are loaded with umami (the so-called fifth taste), an element in certain foods that lifts the flavors of everything it's blended with.
NEWS
By LYNNE ROSSETTO KASPER / Scripps Howard News Service | July 19, 2009
Dear Lynne: Solve a mystery for me, please. Verjuice -- what is it? I am a pretty sophisticated foodie, but this is a new one. What am I missing and is there a substitute? --Jerry in Lincoln Dear Jerry: Verjuice is the juice of unripe grapes. It can be gently sweet or lean toward tart. Substitute a sweet-tart blend of grape juice and cider vinegar, or fruity white wine with a little vinegar. Use it instead of vinegar in salads (a good way to make salad wine-friendly), use it wherever wine is used for marinades and sauces, and pour it over fruit, or over ice with bubbly water for a summer tonic.
NEWS
By BOB BATZ Jr. / Pittsburgh Post-Gazette | April 8, 2009
Here is a recipe to consider making for Passover, the eight-day Jewish festival marking the ancient Hebrews' deliverance from slavery in Egypt. This year, Passover begins at sundown today and continues until sundown on April 16. ROASTED GARLIC ASPARAGUS (Tested by the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette) I'd never made asparagus on parchment paper, but this recipe turned out great, and cleanup was a snap. I loved the flavor from the onion powder, which I don't normally use. -- Bob Batz Jr. 1/2 cup extra-virgin olive oil 8 cloves fresh garlic, minced 1 teaspoon onion powder 2 tablespoons fresh finely chopped parsley 2 pounds thin asparagus, ends trimmed Fleur de sel or coarse sea salt Freshly ground black pepper Makes 6 servings.
NEWS
September 7, 2008
3 tablespoons olive oil, divided 2 cloves garlic, minced Two 12-ounce bunches broccoli raab, trimmed and coarsely chopped 1 teaspoon red pepper flakes 1 pint grape tomatoes 14-ounce can white beans, rinsed and drained 1/4 cup grated Parmesan cheese, for garnish In a wok over medium-high, heat 2 tablespoons of the oil. Add the garlic and saute until it sizzles, then add the broccoli raab and red pepper flakes. Season with salt and saute 5 to 7 minutes, or until the broccoli raab is wilted.
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