Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: HeraldMail HomeCollectionsGarden
IN THE NEWS

Garden

NEWS
BY KEVIN CLAPP | May 6, 2002
kevinc@herald-mail.com Dreams are a fluid state that drown the mind in a torrent of ideas before slipping away at the first sign of coherence. Hard to remember, the fleeting memories of a dream are difficult enough to make sense of individually, never mind sharing them with a confidante. But for Irene Gennaro, the images that seek her out in dreams are a way of life. In The Responsibility of Dreams, the New York-based artist shares with her audience those figures that spring forth from her imagination to assume vibrant life from blocks of wood.
Advertisement
NEWS
By ROBERT SNYDER | January 22, 2006
martinsburg@herald-mail.com MARTINSBURG, W.VA. - Virginia Pledger had all she could stand and she couldn't stand no more. Pledger, an eight-year resident of Martinsburg who had turned her opposition to late-night noise from idling locomotives at the city's MARC Layover Facility into a one-woman crusade, said this week she finally saw the handwriting on the wall, sold her house and lit out in search of a little peace and quiet....
NEWS
By ALICIA NOTARIANNI | October 20, 2007
CLEAR SPRING - Sure, they look pretty and they smell good, but the virtues of roses far surpass mere aesthetics and aromas for the Rev. Douglas Seidel. To Seidel, roses provide a unique narrative of history itself, from Greco-Roman times through the Middle Ages to the Renaissance and beyond. "Roses draw parallels to the growth of human civilization. The story of the rose is more complicated and convoluted than the plot of a racy soap opera," Seidel said Oct. 13 at St. John's United Church of Christ in Clear Spring, where he presented a lecture and slide presentation on heritage roses for the Clear Spring District Historical Association.
NEWS
by BONNIE H. BRECHBILL | April 11, 2004
bonnieb@herald-mail.com WAYNESBORO, PA. - Sixteen people with trowels, rakes, shovels, and mulch beautified the front lawn of Trinity United Church of Christ in Waynesboro Saturday morning. The group, all members of the church's Rosecraft gardening club, planted 40 rose bushes in memory or in honor of loved ones, according to Carol Mowen of Greencastle, Pa. She planted a bush in memory of her mother. The Rosecraft group was formed last August, the result of a brainstorming session of the church's Christian Education Board, Mowen said.
NEWS
July 23, 2009
JAN. 6, 1916-JULY 21, 2009 MYERSVILLE, Md. - Miss Mildred Mae Grossnickle, 93, of Myersville, died Tuesday, July 21, 2009, at Frederick Memorial Hospital. She was born Jan. 6, 1916, in Myersville and was the daughter of the late John Peter and Bessie Mae Blickenstaff Grossnickle. Mildred was a very active lifelong member of the Myersville Church of the Brethren, where she sang in the choir, taught Sunday School for many years, had served as church board chair, composed the history of the church and was instrumental in designing the church's bicentennial quilt.
OBITUARIES
December 22, 2011
Cody Emanuele Butz, 18, of 15945 Broadfording Road, Hagerstown, and formerly of Harve de Grace, Md., died Wednesday, Dec. 21, 2011. Born June 11, 1993, in Baltimore, Md., he was the son of Carin D. Horsley Trecannelli and stepson of Stephen Trecannelli of Hagerstown, and son of Guy A. Butz Jr. of Harve de Grace. He was a senior at Clear Spring High School. He enjoyed baseball, football, wrestling and especially hunting and fishing. In addition to his parents, he is survived by a sister, Brooke Amber Butz of Harve de Grace; two brothers, Guy Allen Butz II of Harve de Grace and Matthew Walter Butz of Fallston, Md.; maternal grandfather, Walter Horsley of Bel Air, Md.; paternal grandfather, Guy Allen Butz Sr. of Harve de Grace; paternal stepgrandparents, Andrew S. and Tyson Ann Trecannelli of Gettysburg, Pa.; and several nieces and nephews.
NEWS
by JULIE E. GREENE | August 17, 2003
julieg@herald-mail.com Saturday's Spud Fest was a "taterific" treat for more than 70 people, including about two dozen children, who showed up to dig out potatoes and taste homemade potato chips. Elisha Taney, 8, of near Boonsboro showed neighbor Virginia Slifer an odd-shaped potato that Slifer said looked like a hoot owl, except the potato had a tail. "I think this is educational for the children. A lot of these kids, I bet they didn't know potatoes came out of the ground," said Slifer, 80. Slifer was busy watching her three great grandchildren and Elisha pick potatoes the same way she did when she was 10 years old. "I'm not picking any today.
NEWS
December 23, 1997
Mail Call "To all the Scrooges selling this Singing and Snoring Ernie for more that you paid for them - bah humbug. To all the parents that are dumb enough to pay that much, the kids will have more fun playing with the box it came in. Thank you. " ----- "Yes. This is to the person who took my pocketbook from the Hagerstown Cinemas Wednesday morning. If at all possible I would really appreciate it if you'd turn it into the guys at the cinemas or give myself or my husband Randy a call.
NEWS
April 8, 2009
This year, I resolve to keep ahead of the flower and vegetable gardens. Hahahahaha. No, seriously. I know I say this every year, but every year I get closer to meaning it. I am going to get things in the ground when they need to be in the ground -- no more waiting until June to plant the lettuce -- and I will react with alacrity to any threat. I will be the Paul Revere of early warning gardening action: One if by bug, two if by weed. Right now, as the weeds and bugs have yet to make a serious appearance, this seems doable.
NEWS
July 8, 1999
An update from the groundhog wars: It's not going well. Not long ago I wrote a column about my struggle with a family of groundhogs who have graduated from digging holes in my yard to vandalizing my pick-up truck, chewing fuel lines and other wiring to the tune of $229. I've gotten a ton of advice on how to get rid of them. Folks have recommended everything from poisoned apples to quick blasts from a shotgun. But the day the column appeared, a Herald-Mail retiree called and said he hated to think about me killing those little creatures.
The Herald-Mail Articles
|