Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: HeraldMail HomeCollectionsGarden Tools
IN THE NEWS

Garden Tools

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
April 14, 1997
By LISA GRAYBEAL Staff Writer, Waynesboro WAYNESBORO, Pa. - Seniors, people who are disabled or those who just suffer from occasional achy backs shouldn't be denied the pleasures of gardening. That's the basis of a new book, "Accessible Gardening," by Waynesboro author Joann Woy. "If you really love it and want to keep on, you can find ways," Woy said, whose recently published 200-page paperback book is full of gardening and landscaping tips and techniques to help anyone overcome obstacles that may get in the way of enjoying their horticultural pursuits.
NEWS
July 15, 2013
Soon you'll be harvesting basketfuls of produce, happily overrun with tomatoes and sneaking giant zucchini onto unsuspecting neighbors' porches. Then you're done, right? Maybe not. Before you hang up those garden tools, think about extending your garden season right into fall and winter. Peas, beans, broccoli, greens and root vegetables such as carrots can sail right through cooler weather.  Why bother? You get fresh, healthy, homegrown food several months longer. Many pests and diseases diminish or disappear as it gets cooler.
NEWS
Alicia Notarianni | Making Ends Meet | September 28, 2012
My last couple of gardens have been such epic fails that this year, I didn't even try. The decision to take a gardening sabbatical was not an easy on. My youngest children enjoy turning the soil, sowing the seeds, monitoring the growth and - most of all - reaping the harvest. But we were away quite a bit the last couple of summers. We didn't arrange for a friend to tend to watering and most of the crops were burned dry by the sun. Funny how the good dies off, but the weeds live on. What little harvest there was was practically overcome by undesirable growth.
NEWS
by TIM ROWLAND | January 20, 2004
Earlier this month, the war on terrorism took an ominous turn, then the government, according to The Associated Press, warned police to "be alert for people carrying almanacs, cautioning that the popular reference books covering everything from abbreviations to weather trends could be used for terrorist planning. " Police warned 18,000 police agencies to beware of people carrying almanacs, saying they could be used for "target selection and pre-operational planning. " Guess the Old Farmers aren't as harmless as had been generally assumed.
NEWS
April 9, 2013
Native Plants Program On Saturday, April 20, at 1 p.m, the Cumberland Woodland Owners Association is sponsoring a “Native Plants” program at Spring Haven Nurseries in Newburg, Pa.  Spring Haven Nurseries specializes in native woodland plants and shade perennials grown either in propagation beds or in the gardens there. Annette McCoy, Penn State Extension consumer horticulture educator, will lead a tour and present information about “Spring Ephemerals” and other early spring blooming plants.
NEWS
July 8, 2013
Washington County Tuesday, Aug. 13 - Vegetable Garden Season Extension, 6:30 to 8 p.m. at University of Maryland Extension - Washington County. Would you like to pick fresh broccoli from your garden in December? This class covers techniques to extend your vegetable-growing season into the late fall (and possibly winter). The class will cover cold-hardy crop choices, planting dates, and how to protect crops with cold frames, row covers, plastic covers, mulch, etc. Vegetable focus: cabbage family.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
July 15, 2013
Washington County Ag Expo and Fair - Starts Saturday and runs through July 27 at the Washington County Agricultural Education Center, 7313 Sharpsburg Pike, south of Hagerstown; Cost: $6 daily gate admission; free for those ages 2 and younger. Includes unlimited carnival rides, but not track events. Track event admission costs $10 per day; free for those ages 8 and younger. Special discount rate on Sunday: $15 gate admission. Includes unlimited carnival rides, track events, and all other fair activities.
Advertisement
NEWS
July 15, 2013
Soon you'll be harvesting basketfuls of produce, happily overrun with tomatoes and sneaking giant zucchini onto unsuspecting neighbors' porches. Then you're done, right? Maybe not. Before you hang up those garden tools, think about extending your garden season right into fall and winter. Peas, beans, broccoli, greens and root vegetables such as carrots can sail right through cooler weather.  Why bother? You get fresh, healthy, homegrown food several months longer. Many pests and diseases diminish or disappear as it gets cooler.
NEWS
April 23, 2013
Grazing and Pasture Management - The class will meet Tuesdays from 6 to 8 p.m. on April 30, May 28, June 4, June 11 and June 25. University of Maryland Extension has developed a five-session course for grazing and pasture management. The course is geared not only to the full-time livestock producer, but to the small part-time and backyard farmer as well. Participants will receive two texts: “Weeds of the Northeast,” and “Southern Forages,” as well as an informational workbook for enrolling in the course.
NEWS
Alicia Notarianni | Making Ends Meet | September 28, 2012
My last couple of gardens have been such epic fails that this year, I didn't even try. The decision to take a gardening sabbatical was not an easy on. My youngest children enjoy turning the soil, sowing the seeds, monitoring the growth and - most of all - reaping the harvest. But we were away quite a bit the last couple of summers. We didn't arrange for a friend to tend to watering and most of the crops were burned dry by the sun. Funny how the good dies off, but the weeds live on. What little harvest there was was practically overcome by undesirable growth.
NEWS
by TIM ROWLAND | January 20, 2004
Earlier this month, the war on terrorism took an ominous turn, then the government, according to The Associated Press, warned police to "be alert for people carrying almanacs, cautioning that the popular reference books covering everything from abbreviations to weather trends could be used for terrorist planning. " Police warned 18,000 police agencies to beware of people carrying almanacs, saying they could be used for "target selection and pre-operational planning. " Guess the Old Farmers aren't as harmless as had been generally assumed.
NEWS
April 14, 1997
By LISA GRAYBEAL Staff Writer, Waynesboro WAYNESBORO, Pa. - Seniors, people who are disabled or those who just suffer from occasional achy backs shouldn't be denied the pleasures of gardening. That's the basis of a new book, "Accessible Gardening," by Waynesboro author Joann Woy. "If you really love it and want to keep on, you can find ways," Woy said, whose recently published 200-page paperback book is full of gardening and landscaping tips and techniques to help anyone overcome obstacles that may get in the way of enjoying their horticultural pursuits.
The Herald-Mail Articles
|