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NEWS
July 17, 2010
Morgan Roof, Rachel Shirk and Matthew Shirk hold yellow squash that were grown in their grandmother's garden in Hagerstown. Brenda Shirk, the children's grandmother, said last year she planted yellow squash and green zucchini plants. This year, the plants came back voluntarily and the vegetables are a combination of both. Brenda Shirk lives on Liberty Street in Hagerstown.
NEWS
September 14, 2008
The Herald-Mail runs photos of unusual items found in the garden. If you find something unusual in your garden, take a photo and send it in. You can drop it off at The Herald-Mail at 100 Summit Ave.; e-mail it to tonym@herald-mail.com ; or mail it to The Herald-Mail, Box 439, Hagerstown MD 21741.
LIFESTYLE
May 10, 2013
The Washington County Master Gardeners will hold a free garden photography workshop from 6:30 to 8 p.m. Tuesday, May 14, at the Washington County Agricultural Education Center, 7303 Sharpsburg Pike, south of Hagerstown. The class is free, but registration is required. To register, contact Diane Woodring at 301-791-1504 or dwoodrin@umd.edu.
NEWS
by Dorry Baird Norris | August 25, 2002
In garden books, compost is often described as "black gold. " That's true, of course. Compost is money in the garden bank. But the real gardener's gold is hidden in the small corm of Crocus sativa - the saffron crocus. Saffron's six-petaled purple or white flowers make a perfect setting for the vermilion stigmas that leap from their centers. These stigmas are the world's costliest spice. No wonder saffron is a budget buster. It takes 60,000 to 75,000 (depending on your reference)
NEWS
By ANNETTE IPSAN | aipsan@umd.edu | March 19, 2013
In a few weeks they will return, flashes of emerald winging their way through our gardens. Adding grace notes to the beauty of our flowers, the hummingbirds will be back. Around April 15 each year, hummingbirds return from their winter digs. Weighing the same as a dime, they pack plenty of power in a small package. Their wings beat 90 times a second and their aerial acrobatics are second to none.  Our local hummingbird is the ruby-throated hummingbird. The males sport a jaunty red handkerchief of feathers they flash to attract females and warn off male aggressors.  Hey, baby.
NEWS
October 12, 2008
Melissa Shoemaker, 10, holds an odd-shaped, 2-pound potato she and her Pappy found in Pappy's garden on U.S. 40 East.
NEWS
October 1, 2009
Keegan Everson, 4, planted a watermelon plant in his garden at his Pappy Martin's in Clear Spring. The watermelon is 34 inches in circumference and weighs 25 1/2 pounds. Keegan shared it with is daycare friends at Citi.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
BY KAUSTUV BASU | kaustuv.basu@herald-mail.com | September 10, 2013
Bells tolled and bugles sounded at Hagerstown City Park Tuesday evening as the community paused to remember emergency personnel and those in the armed forces who lost their lives in the line of duty. Some stopped to reminisce in front of the 9/11 memorial at the park about the day 12 years ago, a beautiful late summer day not unlike Tuesday, when two planes flew into the World Trade Center in New York City, the Pentagon was attacked, and passengers fought with hijackers as they brought down an airliner near Shanksville, Pa. Remembrance in the Park was a tribute to lost lives, at war and at home, to terrorist attacks and other emergencies.
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NEWS
September 2, 2013
I love free things. I especially love free plants. If you are growing perennials, getting free plants is as easy as digging and dividing them every few years.  What are perennials? They are the blooming plants whose tops die back in winter, then return each spring from their roots. Magic! I'm not supposed to play favorites, but I love perennials for their varied shapes, sizes, colors and blooms. Plus, they give you free plants.   Most perennials need to be divided every three years or so to maintain vigor.
LIFESTYLE
August 27, 2013
The Franklin County Master Gardeners will present a composting workshop from 6:30 to 8:30 p.m. Monday, Sept. 9, at the Ag Heritage Center, 181 Franklin Farm Lane in Chambersburg. Extension Environmental Educator George Hurd and Master Gardener Jane Krumpe will teach participants how to create their own “garden gold” from kitchen scraps and yard waste. Information will include do's and donts of home composting, and various methods of producing compost. The fee for this program is $10 and advance registration is required.
NEWS
August 19, 2013
What gives a kick to pesto, sass to sauces, and may ward off vampires? Flavorful, healthful garlic. One of the oldest known horticultural crops, garlic can trace its roots back 5,000 years to the ancient Egyptians and Chinese. Since then, it has become favored across the globe for its culinary uses and health benefits. Garlic is ridiculously easy to grow. You plant in the fall and harvest in late June. The wait is the hard part.  So, how do you get started? Garlic likes full sun and rich, crumbly soil.
NEWS
August 11, 2013
Washington County Master Gardener Will Godwin will hold a free workshop on creating and maintaining perennial gardens on Saturday, Aug. 24, from 9 to 11 a.m. at Western Maryland Hospital Center, 1500 Pennsylvania Ave. in Hagerstown.  Participants will learn how to design, plant and care for perennials, blooming plants which return year after year.  The workshop will include a garden tour and hands-on training in deadheading and dividing perennials....
LIFESTYLE
August 8, 2013
Washington County Master Gardeners teach participants techniques for stretching the growing season into November and December.  The class reviews cold-hardy crops, planting dates and various methods for protecting crops from the cold including cold frames, row covers and plastic covers.  Class will be from 6:30 to 8 p.m. Tuesday, Aug. 13, Washington County Agricultural Education Center, 7303 Sharpsburg Pike, south of Hagerstown. Free.  Advance registration required. Call 301-791-1304 or email dwoodrin@umd.edu . 
NEWS
August 5, 2013
Spies are sneaking into my carefully arranged garden beds. Herbs are lurking in my perennials. Fruits have infiltrated my herb bed. Tomatoes and squash are harboring sunflowers and catmint. And you know what? I like it.  I have discovered the joys of edible landscaping, mixing in plants you can eat with those that you can't. It's smart, lovely and sensible. Why not tuck in beautiful edibles among your posies? More gardeners are growing their own food because it's healthier and kinder to the environment.
LIFESTYLE
By LEIGH-ANNE MAUK | Special to The Herald-Mail | August 3, 2013
Six years ago, several Clear Spring residents decided to start a community garden that would provide support to those hit hard by a struggling economy. “There were a lot of 'for sale' signs in the neighborhood and several families where (people) had been laid off,” said Jametta McDaniel, one of the original garden founders. “We knew we had to do something.” During its first five years, the Clear Spring Community Garden was located on St. Paul Road at the property of one of the garden's founding members.
NEWS
By DAN DEARTH | dan.dearth@herald-mail.com | August 1, 2013
Hagerstown police have charged a man with being involved in a stabbing that left another man critically injured early Wednesday at the Washington Gardens apartment complex off Security Road in Hagerstown. Roy Dwight Winston Jr., 19, of West Washington Street in Hagerstown appeared for a bail-review hearing Thursday via a closed-circuit television between the Washington County Detention Center and Washington County District Court. Judge R. Noel Spence reduced Winston's bond from $100,000 to $75,000, despite a request from defense attorney Edward Button to release Winston on his own recognizance.
LIFESTYLE
July 31, 2013
Franklin County Master Gardener Laurie Collins guides participants with identification of the many pollinators in our area and presents easy design principles, plant selections and gardening practices for creating a successful pollinator garden. The workshop will be from 9 to 11 a.m. Saturday, Aug. 17, at Franklin County Cooperative Extension, 181 Franklin Farm Lane, Chambersburg. Cost is $10. Advance registration required. Call 717-263-9226
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