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NEWS
By CALEB CALHOUN | caleb.calhoun@herald-mail.com | June 4, 2012
Hagerstown resident Rick Curry did not hide his opposition Monday to the expansion of gambling in Maryland. “People have enough addictions already,” he said. “We have lotteries, tip jars and scratch-offs.” Curry, 50, was among area residents who talked Monday about the idea of casinos and gambling in Western Maryland after Maryland's legislative leadership in late May discussed possible dates for a special session to consider the expansion of gambling in the state. Area residents had mixed reactions on the subject, and Curry said he does not think gambling would be good for Hagerstown.
NEWS
by BOB MAGINNIS | August 6, 2002
Unlike the Maryland governor's race, both candidates in the Pennsylvania gubernatorial race support using slot-machine revenue as a new source of state revenue. What they don't agree on is where the cash would go. After the measures lawmakers took to pass this year's budget, it's clear something has to happen. In a desperate attempt to avoid raising taxes in an election, lawmakers agreed to use half the state's Rainy Day funds and also issue bonds to finance a business tax cut. It's a trick they can't do twice, a fact most voters seem to realize.
NEWS
by DAVE McMILLION | December 8, 2004
charlestown@herald-mail.com SHEPHERDSTOWN, W.VA. - With the likelihood that gambling is going to be a big part of the state and local economy for some time, Shepherd University officials have decided to offer studies in gaming. In the spring semester, Shepherd will offer an introductory course in gaming, and school officials may take the subject further by making gaming an area of study at the school, Shepherd University Athletic Director Karl Wolf said Tuesday. If gaming is made an area of study under the school's Department of Health, Physical Education and Recreation, students could learn all facets of the gambling industry, including hospitality, marketing, business and legal issues, Wolf said.
NEWS
by TIM ROWLAND | December 4, 2003
Great news on the Washington County gambling front. Tips are no longer confined to jars. They have broken the shackles of the fishbowl, and are now being dispensed by machines at a retail outlet near you. That's right, if you found it to be too much effort to wag your finger at a barmaid and then wait an interminable number of seconds while she ambled over with a jar of paper tips for you to peel apart, your suffering is at an end. Now...
NEWS
November 14, 2003
That question could dominate the next West Virginia governor's race, if Democratic candidate Joe Manchin has his way. We feel that's the wrong approach. Adding table games to the state's horse tracks, as Manchin proposes, would be a major escalation of gambling, a step that should not be taken without more study than it's likely to get in an election campaign. Manchin, West Virginia's secretary of state, this week said that the four counties that now have slot machines at their race tracks should have the opportunity to decide whether they want to add so-called table games to their offerings.
NEWS
January 31, 2006
Maryland, which is already at least a furlong behind West Virginia when it comes to putting slot machines at horse tracks, now has another gambling issue in common with the Mountain State. It's video games such as electronic poker, which West Virginia legalized to fund its PROMISE scholarship program. Before they were legalized, thousands of the so-called "gray machines" were operated all over West Virginia, with the income from them untaxed. Now a report released last week by the Abell Foundation estimated that Maryland loses millions of dollars each year because operators of such games don't report all their income and pay winners under the table.
NEWS
by TIM ROWLAND | February 6, 2003
Excellent, it's all coming together. For years I've been saying that we don't need slot machines just at Maryland racetracks, we need slots in many more convenient locations - preferably on everyone's front porch. Problem there is that we may run into a few of those "private property" wackos who might believe it an infringement on their "rights" if the government were to forcibly install a slot machine next to the rose trellis. They could tie the issue up in court, so it may not be worth the trouble.
NEWS
By JENNIFER FITCH | August 25, 2009
WAYNESBORO, PA. -- The American Legion post in Waynesboro will not serve alcohol or allow gambling for a 30-day period starting Sept. 21 due to punishments related to an investigation by the Pennsylvania State Police's liquor control enforcement bureau. Joe Stickell American Legion Post 15, at 63 E. Main St., was charged with violating small games of chance regulations for three weeks and failing to properly maintain records, according to state police Sgt. Mark Crossan. The club was accused of paying out more than the $5,000-a-week threshold set by law, Crossan said.
NEWS
By BONNIE BICK | September 13, 2008
When you think of state parks in Maryland, you think of wide open green spaces, forests and protected animal habitats. Until now, that is what Rocky Gap has been to thousands of Marylanders - 3,000 rural acres of dense woods, cliffs and gorges, including Lake Habeeb and Evitts Mountain. The park has an active nature center with nature hikes, demonstrations, and children's programs. It also boasts camping sites and a place to host a wedding. If the pro-slots lobby has its way in November, the park would also boast a gambling casino, and therefore a place to lose your money.
NEWS
by GREGORY T. SIMMONS | August 11, 2004
gregs@herald-mail.com A firefighters union fund-raiser expected to draw thousands of people to Hagerstown in September 2005 will raise money through alcohol sales, gambling and by raffling off cash, vehicles and firearms, organizers of the event said Tuesday night. The Hagerstown City Council gave organizers from the International Association of Fire Fighters Local 1605 the go-ahead to continue planning the event, but city officials asked questions about the fund-raising methods and what the union would do with the money.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By ROXANN MILLER | roxann.miller@herald-mail.com | August 20, 2013
With Procter & Gamble poised to bring thousands of jobs to the area next year and several local companies expanding, the president of the Franklin County Area Development Corp. said Tuesday that the county is positioned for growth. Speaking at a Greencastle-Antrim Chamber of Commerce breakfast at Green Grove Gardens, L. Michael Ross said there is a lot on the horizon for the county. “I think we're in a great place at a great time,” Ross told hundreds of business leaders assembled for the event.
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NEWS
By JENNIFER FITCH | waynesboro@herald-mail.com | July 18, 2013
A $93 million Procter & Gamble warehouse being developed in Franklin County, Pa., is expected to bring nearly 1,000 jobs to the region, the company announced Thursday. The consumer goods powerhouse said it will use a new 1.7 million-square-foot distribution center to serve its Northeast retailers. “Shippensburg is a perfect location,” said Jeff LaRoy, a spokesman for P&G. P&G will lease the facility from Liberty Property Trust, a real estate investment business based in Malvern, Pa. It has holdings in the Lehigh Valley, central Pennsylvania and Hagerstown.
SPORTS
By TIM KOELBLE | koelble@herald-mail.com | December 8, 2012
St. Maria Goretti senior Kevin Proctor has no problem staying busy throughout the year - especially the last two years. It is likely that Proctor is the first Gaels athlete to compete in four sports during the school year - and may be one of the first in all Washington County schools. “I love all the sports I play,” Proctor said before he prepared for a recent Goretti basketball practice. For the second year, Proctor is competing in basketball, baseball, soccer and cross country at Goretti.
NEWS
By CALEB CALHOUN | caleb.calhoun@herald-mail.com | November 29, 2012
For many people who bought Powerball tickets before Wednesday night's $587.5 million drawing, two bucks might seem like a small investment. For some, that's what it is, but others see playing the lottery as gambling that, in some cases, could fuel an addiction. “I buy a ticket once a week, but I know how to handle it,” said Serita Cooper of Hagerstown. “I'm not addicted to it. I don't have to have it every day.” For others, the urge to buy lottery tickets could be an addiction, just as playing table games or slots can be, said Richard Benchoff, program director of Wells House Inc. in Hagerstown, which provides treatment to men with addictions.
OPINION
September 17, 2012
You've seen the negative television ads concerning Question 7, which would significantly expand gambling in Maryland. Casinos apparently are evil, sinful, unwholesome and destructive of families. Gambling won't produce the promised revenue. And the cash won't go into schools and senior citizen programs, instead it will go straight into the pockets of those slick, cigar-chomping casino owners. And the people who say so ought to know, because the negative ads are being paid for by the very same slick, cigar-chomping casino owners.
SPORTS
August 19, 2012
There is a little Doyle Brunson in all of us. Every one has a small piece of professional poker player in them … even if he or she doesn't know it. Brunson is one of the forefathers of his game because he calculates odds and takes well-timed risks on the turn of a card. When the chips are down, Brunson's hunches turn into a rather lucrative career. For folks like us, risks come in different packages. But in reality, everyone is a gambler at heart. You are rolling the dice the minute you hit the alarm and get out of bed. Everything from that point on can be divided into wins and losses by attempts, choices and decisions.
NEWS
By ANDREW SCHOTZ | andrews@herald-mail.com | August 15, 2012
The just-finished debate over whether Maryland should legalize table games and add a sixth casino cut through political parties and county delegations. Of the six Republicans representing Washington County in Annapolis, three voted in favor of the final bill crafted during the recent Maryland General Assembly special session and three voted against. Both Democrats in Washington County's delegation voted yes. For Del. LeRoy E. Myers Jr., R-Washington/Allegany, who voted for the bill, the question was what would benefit his constituents the most.
NEWS
By CALEB CALHOUN | caleb.calhoun@herald-mail.com | June 4, 2012
Hagerstown resident Rick Curry did not hide his opposition Monday to the expansion of gambling in Maryland. “People have enough addictions already,” he said. “We have lotteries, tip jars and scratch-offs.” Curry, 50, was among area residents who talked Monday about the idea of casinos and gambling in Western Maryland after Maryland's legislative leadership in late May discussed possible dates for a special session to consider the expansion of gambling in the state. Area residents had mixed reactions on the subject, and Curry said he does not think gambling would be good for Hagerstown.
NEWS
By ANDREW SCHOTZ | andrews@herald-mail.com | April 9, 2012
Washington County got caught up in the crossfire of multiple gambling debates Monday as the Maryland General Assembly's session wound down. In one case, Washington County's delegates walked out of the House chamber rather than take a precarious vote that, they thought, could have hurt their own interests. Also, a delegation bill pertaining to Washington County's tip-jar gaming was bottled up, and apparently died, in a House committee preoccupied with a controversial proposal paving the way for a casino in Prince George's County.
LIFESTYLE
By MARIE GILBERT | marieg@herald-mail.com | September 29, 2011
Some will lie about their earnings. Others will siphon money from joint accounts. Then, there are those who create elaborate schemes to cover up gambling addictions and thousands of dollars of debt. Having an affair isn't the only form of cheating that can ruin a marriage. There's also financial infidelity - lying to a spouse or partner about money. And, just like an affair, it can erode trust, create conflict and spell doom to a relationship. According to a survey conducted earlier this year by the National Endowment for Financial Education, 31 percent of 2,000 respondents said they had been deceptive about money.
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