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Fuel

NEWS
November 8, 1999
Allegheny Power customers in Maryland may see a slight decrease in their bills next month, under a rate reduction request before the Public Service Commission. The company has asked the PSC to decrease its fuel rate from 1.195 cents per kilowatt hour to 1.118 cents per kilowatt hour. If approved, the average customer using 1,000 kilowatts of electricity would see a 75-cent reduction in their monthly bill effective Dec. 7. The fuel rate is a small line item on Maryland customers' bills that reflects the cost of fuel used to generate electricity.
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NEWS
By DAN DEARTH and JOSHUA BOWMAN | November 25, 2007
WASHINGTON COUNTY As gas prices climb, local governments are feeling the sting at the pump as much as, if not more than, private residents. Washington County, the City of Hagerstown and the board of education all anticipate higher fuel costs this year than last. The city expects to spend about $92,000 more on gasoline than it budgeted for fiscal year 2008, and county departments are being asked to reduce mileage whenever possible. The board of education increased its motor vehicle fuel budget to $633,339 this year after spending $571,032 in fiscal year 2007, but officials said they also are affected by the rising cost of heating fuel.
NEWS
by STACEY DANZUSO | December 18, 2002
chambersburg@herald-mail.com CHAMBERSBURG - As Fulton Farm Manager Matt Steiman turns on an irrigation pump fueled with biodiesel, the faint scent of greasy french fries wafts from the machinery. Steiman is experimenting with alternative fuel sources, including biodiesel, which is created by a chemical reaction among methanol, lye and leftover vegetable oil from the Wilson College dining hall. "We're excited about the possibility of generating our own renewable fuel produced from a waste product produced here," Steiman said.
NEWS
By FEDORA COPLEY / Pulse corresondent | July 8, 2008
Editor's note: This is the first article in a two-part series about one teen's struggle to go fossil free for a week. What would life be like without fossil fuels? Pretty hard to imagine, in a civilization where nearly everything we do involves petroleum, natural gas or coal. When we use electrical appliances, we're using fossil fuels - the production of electricity uses coal. When we drive in cars, we're burning gasoline, a refined version of petroleum. When companies make things - furniture, silverware, pasta, soap or this newspaper - fossil fuels help them.
NEWS
By BRENDAN KIRBY | September 22, 1999
Tri-State area residents lulled by mild winters and last year's low fuel prices may find heating their homes over the coming winter will take a bigger bite out of their wallets, according to representatives of some local fuel companies. Oil, propane and kerosene will cost between 10 percent and 30 percent more this winter than last year, companies predicted. "The cost is definitely going to be higher," said J. William Walter, operations manager of HJ Tanner Inc. in Chambersburg, Pa. "We never know what it's going to be until we pick it up at the terminal.
NEWS
by WANDA T. WILLIAMS | May 28, 2004
wandaw@herald-mail A spike in seasonal construction and manufacturing business has spurred job growth in Washington County, local employment and economic development experts said. The unemployment rate dropped from 4.5 percent in March to 3.7 percent in April. That is the lowest the jobless rate for the county has been since September 2002, when it was 3.7 percent. "Generally speaking, it's a seasonal issue. As you get into spring and summer there's more hiring with construction," Western Maryland Job Service Director Shanon Wolf said.
NEWS
by WANDA T. WILLIAMS | December 26, 2004
wandaw@herald-mail.com Like modern-day quilters, devoted scrapbookers travel to Hagerstown from across the Tri-State area to buy scrapbooking materials and participate in sorority-like gatherings called "crops. " "It's when scrapbookers bring supplies and work on their own pictures and albums in a group. It's more of a social thing, a time to let down your hair and relax," said Kelly Adams, who works at ScrapMania! on Crestwood Drive, where crops are held. When making albums, scrapbookers crop most of their photographs as they design scrapbook pages, Adams said.
NEWS
by JULIE E. GREENE | March 31, 2003
julieg@herald-mail.com Joe Kime Jr. already has lost a son to a U.S. war with Iraq. He doesn't want to lose his grandchildren to a second war with the Persian Gulf nation. None of his two grandsons and three granddaughters are in the military, but Kime fears that increasing U.S. casualties in the war with Iraq could lead to the draft being reactivated. His grandchildren in Martinsburg and Hedgesville, W.Va., and in North Carolina are at or approaching draft age. "I'm not antiwar or anything else," said the Korean War veteran and Jefferson County resident.
NEWS
by GREGORY T. SIMMONS | February 10, 2004
gregs@herald-mail.com Mary Jane "Sadie" Zook, 86, received a $223 check in the mail last week from a stranger. A city of Hagerstown contractor in December cleared snow and ice from the sidewalk in front of Zook's Virginia Avenue home and she was billed $223 for the work. The check for the same amount was sent in part out of kindness, and in part because of "outrage," said Dr. Tom Gilbert, who wrote the check. Gilbert, chairman of emergency medicine at Washington County Hospital, said he has seen many older patients come to the hospital with injuries related to falls on snow and ice. "I thought it was an outrage that an 86-year-old get charged for ice and snow on her sidewalk," Gilbert said.
NEWS
by CHRIS CARTER / Staff Correspondent | January 11, 2007
MERCERSBURG, Pa. - To see and hear the postgame reactions of the head coaches in Wednesday night's Mid-Penn nondivision game between Northern York and James Buchanan are misleading. Despite falling 63-55 to the Polar Bears, JB coach Kylie Raymo was all smiles and delighted with what she'd just seen. "This is one of our better games. This was us playing well," Raymo said. "You usually won't see a coach this happy after a loss, but I am. " On the other side was Northern coach Gene Below, who was thoroughly disappointed with his team's performance - with the exception of a couple of players.
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