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NEWS
by ERIN JULIUS | March 24, 2007
WASHINGTON COUNTY-This year's confused winter - with warm temperatures in January and snowstorms in March - is not expected to harm the county's fruit crops, said Joseph Fiola, a specialist in viticulture (grape-growing) with the University of Maryland Extension Office. Fruit blooms are delayed this year, which actually might prevent blooms from damage by late frost, he said. "The risks of frosts are going down considerably," Fiola said. Fruit trees in the region have evolved over the years of weather fluctuation and adapted to the weather, Fiola said.
NEWS
July 4, 2006
HARRISBURG, Pa. - A peach tree in a commercial grove in Adams County has been found to have the plum pox virus, the first such finding of the year, the state Department of Agriculture said. "Our surveyors have found the first positive commercial orchard tree this year. It's located in the quarantined area of Menallen Township, Adams County," Agriculture Secretary Dennis Wolff said. "There will be no need to expand the quarantine area as a result of this detection," Wolff said.
NEWS
January 22, 1998
By DAVE McMILLION Staff Writer Eight straight days of springlike weather earlier this month caused some unseasonable occurrences: Forsythia bushes burst into bloom and bulbs peeked from the ground. But there's no need to worry, say local growers and nursery owners. "I have a theory, Mother Nature will take care of herself. There's nothing you have to do," said Troy Gifft of Paramount Nursery in Hagerstown. The warm snap, when temperatures ranged from between 58 degrees to 68 degrees, caused fruit trees to reach the stage they normally reach in March, said Matt Harsh of Clopper's Orchards in Smithsburg.
NEWS
By DAVE McMILLION | April 30, 2000
MARTINSBURG, W.Va. - Blessed with warm temperatures, plenty of rain and, in most areas, little frost, the Tri-State fruit growing season is off to a good start, according to growers and fruit experts. Apple and peach trees are either in full bloom or have completed the blooming, and growers are crossing their fingers that no more major frosts are in store. The last threat of frost for the area ends about May 15, said J. D. Rinehart, owner of Rinehart Orchards near Smithsburg, Md. "I guess it was about two years ago on Mother's Day, that frost took out about half our crop.
NEWS
by CANDICE BOSELY | July 12, 2003
martinsburg@herald-mail.com INWOOD, W.Va. - A Martinsburg, W.Va., man was charged Friday after he allegedly stole a tractor and drove drunkenly through an orchard, destroying three fruit trees. Barry Lee Lung Jr., 25, of East Moler Avenue, was charged with grand larceny, fleeing from police while driving under the influence and destruction of property. According to court records, Berkeley County Deputy T.A. Young was finishing up a complaint Friday evening when someone told him a tractor had just been stolen from Loring Hill Orchards.
LIFESTYLE
BY TIFFANY ARNOLD | tiffanya@herald-mail.com | February 18, 2011
Teresa Bryson earned the title of 2011 American Honey Queen by staying busy as a bee. "Honey bees pollinate almost one third of all our food," said Bryson, who lives near Clay Hill, Pa., south of Chambersburg. "It's very important that we educate the public about the importance of honey bees and get the message out there that we need the honey bees for our food. " The American Beekeeping Federation crowned Bryson as the 2011 American Honey Queen in January, during the North American Beekeeping Conference & Tradeshow in Texas.
NEWS
February 11, 2013
The Washington County Soil Conservation District is conducting its 25th annual tree sale from now until March 20. The district has distributed more than 313,000 trees over the past 24 years.  Trees will be available for pickup during early April in time for spring planting season.   Anyone ordering trees will be contacted by mail with the specific days, times and location of where to pick up the trees. The tree seedling  will be available for pick-up in April. The district will offer a variety of evergreens, hardwoods, fruit trees, nestboxes and bat houses.
NEWS
By ROBERT KESSLER | February 7, 2009
If you are in the market for an apple tree for your yard, you might get confused by terms you find in catalogs. Here's a guide: · Most fruit trees are grafted, which means that the root is a different apple variety from the trunk and branches. The two apple varieties are joined at a union called a graft. The root variety will control the size of the tree. Some roots will produce a standard size tree that is about 20 feet tall and probably too big for most backyard growers.
NEWS
By DON AINES | March 14, 2000
CHAMBERSBURG, Pa. - Fruit growers and agriculture agents in Franklin County, Pa., this spring will be on the lookout for the plum pox virus, which devastated some orchards in neighboring Adams County last year. cont. from news page "We were checked last fall and we were clean," said Dwight Mickey, co-owner of Shatzer's Fruit Market in St. Thomas, Pa. The business has only about two acres of plum trees, but also has about 15 acres of peaches and an acre of apricot trees, two other stone fruits that susceptible to the virus, he said.
NEWS
By ERIN JULIUS | November 30, 1999
This year's confused winter ? with warm temperatures in January and snowstorms in March ? is not expected to harm the county's fruit crops, said Joseph Fiola, a specialist in viticulture (grape-growing) with the University of Maryland Extension Office. Fruit blooms are delayed this year, which actually might prevent blooms from damage by late frost, he said. "The risks of frosts are going down considerably," Fiola said. Fruit trees in the region have evolved over the years of weather fluctuation and adapted to the weather, Fiola said.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
February 11, 2013
The Washington County Soil Conservation District is conducting its 25th annual tree sale from now until March 20. The district has distributed more than 313,000 trees over the past 24 years.  Trees will be available for pickup during early April in time for spring planting season.   Anyone ordering trees will be contacted by mail with the specific days, times and location of where to pick up the trees. The tree seedling  will be available for pick-up in April. The district will offer a variety of evergreens, hardwoods, fruit trees, nestboxes and bat houses.
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NEWS
By DAVE McMILLION | davem@herald-mail.com | March 27, 2012
The early hours of Tuesday morning could be a worrisome time for area fruit growers and backyard gardeners because of a freeze warning that was in effect overnight according to the National Weather Service and a local agricultural official. The warning was lifted at 9 a.m. Overnight temperatures fell below the freezing mark in Washington County, as well as in Franklin and Fulton counties in Pennsylvania and in Berkeley, Jefferson and Morgan counties in West Virginia, the weather service said.
LIFESTYLE
BY TIFFANY ARNOLD | tiffanya@herald-mail.com | February 18, 2011
Teresa Bryson earned the title of 2011 American Honey Queen by staying busy as a bee. "Honey bees pollinate almost one third of all our food," said Bryson, who lives near Clay Hill, Pa., south of Chambersburg. "It's very important that we educate the public about the importance of honey bees and get the message out there that we need the honey bees for our food. " The American Beekeeping Federation crowned Bryson as the 2011 American Honey Queen in January, during the North American Beekeeping Conference & Tradeshow in Texas.
NEWS
By ROBERT KESSLER | February 7, 2009
If you are in the market for an apple tree for your yard, you might get confused by terms you find in catalogs. Here's a guide: · Most fruit trees are grafted, which means that the root is a different apple variety from the trunk and branches. The two apple varieties are joined at a union called a graft. The root variety will control the size of the tree. Some roots will produce a standard size tree that is about 20 feet tall and probably too big for most backyard growers.
NEWS
By JULIE E. GREENE | August 9, 2008
Ever wish you could just walk out the back door and grab a peach to eat, the way you can pull a tomato off the vine in your vegetable garden? You can, but it will take vigilance and maintenance. Just like other fruit trees, peach trees can be a bit of challenge because of various pests and diseases they can face, said Annette Ipsan, horticulture extension educator for the Maryland Cooperative Extension in Washington County. But as the visitors to the Leitersburg Peach Festivalknow, the reward for the effort is so sweet.
NEWS
by ERIN JULIUS | March 24, 2007
WASHINGTON COUNTY-This year's confused winter - with warm temperatures in January and snowstorms in March - is not expected to harm the county's fruit crops, said Joseph Fiola, a specialist in viticulture (grape-growing) with the University of Maryland Extension Office. Fruit blooms are delayed this year, which actually might prevent blooms from damage by late frost, he said. "The risks of frosts are going down considerably," Fiola said. Fruit trees in the region have evolved over the years of weather fluctuation and adapted to the weather, Fiola said.
NEWS
by KAREN HANNA | August 21, 2006
WASHINGTON COUNTY - Whether dealing with days of heavy rain or weeks of dusty dryness, the condition that most concerns farmer David Herbst is heat. Because that's what kills cows. "Birthing is a stressor on them, and with a 106-degree heat index, everything has to be just right for them, or they just drop," Herbst said. Fewer than three weeks after the mercury spiked to nearly triple digits, farmers are dealing with dry conditions just as some of their produce goes to market.
NEWS
July 4, 2006
HARRISBURG, Pa. - A peach tree in a commercial grove in Adams County has been found to have the plum pox virus, the first such finding of the year, the state Department of Agriculture said. "Our surveyors have found the first positive commercial orchard tree this year. It's located in the quarantined area of Menallen Township, Adams County," Agriculture Secretary Dennis Wolff said. "There will be no need to expand the quarantine area as a result of this detection," Wolff said.
NEWS
by Dorry Baird Norris | October 17, 2004
From Wellington, New Zealand, to Vancouver, British Columbia, from Oaxaca, Mexico, to London, England, or Provence, France - plunk me down in anyplace on this earth and the first thing I check out are the gardens. (That's not quite true, I usually look for a good local restaurant first. Then, satisfactorily fortified, I head for the gardens.) Public gardens are sometimes breathtaking and usually carefully tended. The collections of plants boggle the mind. As much as I enjoy the displays, there's part of me that wonders what the local weeds are like and yearn to feel how the soil would feel as I dug my trowel down into it. How many of those beautiful plants were wintered over in a greenhouse or raised to be planted anew each spring?
NEWS
by Lisa Tedrick Prejean | August 13, 2004
"I love you a bushel and a peck A bushel and a peck and a hug around the neck A hug around the neck and a barrel and a heap A barrel and a heap and I'm talking in my sleep About you, about you" When I sing Frank Loesser's song from "Guys and Dolls" to my 5-year-old, she giggles and tells me I'm silly. Not that she complains. She loves the attention. I can tell that she's listening closely to the lyrics. The other day she asked, "Mommy, what's a bushel?"
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