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NEWS
Scott Anderson | Culinary Passion | August 21, 2013
Ready to serve up some stone fruit but with added deliciousness? Look no further. This grilling experience will leave your tastebuds tingling and ready for more. Make sure the figs are ripe, and not rock hard or they won't be as sweet after grilling. Feel them, if they feel firm but give under a light press, then you are ready, simply wash and remove the stem.   In fact, be sure to wash all your fruit and remove any grocery stickers, as they are not too tasty when grilled.   Scott C. Anderson is associate food service director and chef with Shepherd University dining services in Shepherdstown, W.Va., and Chef Ambassador to the Wisconsin Milk Marketing Board.    Grilled stone fruit with gingered honey   1 cup aged balsamic vinegar (see cook's note)
NEWS
August 27, 2006
8 bamboo skewers, 10 to 12 inches long 2 mangoes, peeled and seeded 2 small papayas, peeled and seeded 1/4 to 1/2 pineapple, peeled and cored 8 strawberries Soak the skewers in cool water for 30 minutes. Preheat a gas grill to medium. If using a charcoal grill, build a fire and let burn until the coals are glowing red with moderate coating of white ash. Spread coals in even bed. Clean cooking grate. Cut fruits into relatively equal-sized pieces. Thread fruit onto skewers, alternating them.
NEWS
August 20, 2002
Elementary Monday - pepperoni pizza, green beans, cinnamon applesauce, Italian ice and milk. Tuesday - chicken nuggets, mashed potatoes with gravy, peaches, fruit turnover and milk. Wednesday - hot dog on bun, baked beans, shape up bar, crispy rice treat and milk. Thursday - beef rigatoni with marinara sauce, corn, assorted fresh fruit, raisins and milk. Friday - shrimp poppers with cocktail sauce, macaroni and cheese, broccoli, mixed fruit and milk. Middle/high school Monday - pepperoni pizza, green beans, cinnamon applesauce, Italian ice and milk.
NEWS
Lynn Little | May 14, 2013
A smoothie is a blended and sometimes sweetened beverage made from fresh fruit and perhaps chocolate or peanut butter. They can also contain milk, yogurt or ice cream. In addition to fruit, many smoothies include crushed ice, frozen fruit and honey. They have a milkshake-like consistency that is thicker than slush drinks. These thick, cold blender beverages are tasty, refreshing and, if made with the right ingredients, nutritious. Smoothies are easy to concoct with ingredients you have in your pantry and can be a great choice for a snack or mini-meal.
NEWS
November 15, 1999
Nov. 17 - Nov. 23 The Washington County Commission on Aging offers noon lunches to anyone over 60 years old at seven locations - Hancock, Smithsburg, Keedysville, Williamsport and three in Hagerstown. A two-day reservation notice is required and a donation is asked per meal. For information, call 301-790-0275. Weekly menu Wednesday - Chili con carne, rice, spinach salad, corn muffin, fruit cocktail and milk. Thursday - Roast turkey dinner, whipped potatoes, sauerkraut, stuffing, chocolate chip cookie, plums and milk.
NEWS
By LYNNE ROSSETTO KASPER / Scripps Howard News Service | July 22, 2009
Dear Lynne: Do you know how to make those fruit waters that you can get in some Hispanic restaurants? They make mango and watermelon and a pretty red one. They seem pretty simple, but I expect they are harder than I think. -- Michael in Los Angeles Dear Michael: Those fruit waters are called aguas frescas (literally translated as "fresh waters") and they are utterly delicious. In Mexico City last year, I was intrigued by their immense variety and the way they melded with the food -- far more easily than most wines would.
NEWS
By BOB KESSLER | August 9, 2008
About this time of year, most gardeners' tomato plants have heavy fruit loads in many stages of ripening, says Steve Bogash, regional horticulture educator. This heavy load takes a toll on the plants as nutrients move rapidly from the plants reserves and surrounding soil into the ripening fruit. In addition, our generally hot, humid conditions are ideal for the development of many fungal and bacterial diseases that can greatly shorten the life of your plants. With a little care, home gardeners can harvest great tomatoes right up to our first frost.
NEWS
by KATE COLEMAN | March 24, 2004
katec@herald-mail.com More than 2,500 varieties of apples are grown in the United States. More than 7,500 apple varieties are grown throughout the world, according to information on the University of Illinois Extension Web site at www.urbanext.uiuc.edu/apples . Still looking for something different? Something wild? A little more exotic? You can find many out-of-the-ordinary delectables in the fruit and vegetable section of your hometown supermarket. Note: To prevent food-borne illness, food safety experts advise washing fruits and vegetables with a clean produce brush.
NEWS
February 22, 1997
From staff reports The recent warm weather shouldn't hurt this year's peach crop, Washington County Extension Agent Don Schwartz said Friday. Schwartz said peach tree buds would swell a bit with the warm weather, but will shrink back when lower temperatures return next week. The peach crop could be hurt if a prolonged stretch of warm weather caused the buds to bloom early and then get hit with a stretch of freezing temperatures. "Anything in agriculture, you never know what Mother Nature is going to throw at you," Schwartz said.
NEWS
By LYNN LITTLE / Special to The Herald-Mail | May 27, 2009
Snacks can provide 25 percent or more of your child's daily food consumption. Because children in the 6-to-12 age group grow two inches and gain about five pounds a year, it is important that snacks help to provide the important nutrients these growing children need. Most children in this age group know about making healthy choices. But it is your job, as the parent, to assure that healthy choices are easily accessible. Use these tips to help assure your children are getting the best nutrient value from their snack choices: o To make it easier for your children to make healthy choices, create two snack bins and keep them filled with individual servings of a variety of foods.
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NEWS
Scott Anderson | Culinary Passion | August 21, 2013
Ready to serve up some stone fruit but with added deliciousness? Look no further. This grilling experience will leave your tastebuds tingling and ready for more. Make sure the figs are ripe, and not rock hard or they won't be as sweet after grilling. Feel them, if they feel firm but give under a light press, then you are ready, simply wash and remove the stem.   In fact, be sure to wash all your fruit and remove any grocery stickers, as they are not too tasty when grilled.   Scott C. Anderson is associate food service director and chef with Shepherd University dining services in Shepherdstown, W.Va., and Chef Ambassador to the Wisconsin Milk Marketing Board.    Grilled stone fruit with gingered honey   1 cup aged balsamic vinegar (see cook's note)
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LIFESTYLE
August 18, 2013
Fruit takes on a whole new flavor when kissed by fire and flame.  Once the subtle sweetness caramelizes on the surface of the fruit, it makes for a delicious treat ready for dessert or a sweet side with your favorite grilled protein. I'm going to take baby steps in grilling, going from an easy recipe and building up to more complex recipes featuring sauces to accompany the tender, grilled fruit.  As always, feel free to make the recipe your own by adding your own fruit to the mix. - Scott C. Anderson is associate food service director and chef with Shepherd University dining services in Shepherdstown, W.Va., and chef ambassador to the Wisconsin Milk Marketing Board.
LIFESTYLE
By CHRIS COPLEY | chrisc@herald-mail.com | August 6, 2013
Editor's note: This is part of an occasional series of stories on children eating vegetables and fruit. The series explores ways to work around picky eaters' resistance to trying vegetables and fruits. This is Leitersburg Peach Festival weekend. This year, there will be more than 100 vendors, a display of antique tractors, Civil War re-enactors and activities for children. But this event is an old-fashioned food festival with most of the emphasis on peaches and foods made with peaches and not a lot of extraneous activity.
NEWS
Lynn Little | July 16, 2013
Fresh produce can harbor bacteria, fungi and other microbes along with trace amounts of chemicals. Traditional cleaning of fruits and vegetables by washing with plain tap water is the best method for removing contamination. Food safety experts recommend washing all produce with plain, cool tap water. Start by making sure your hands are clean. Clean counter tops, cutting boards and utensils with hot soapy water before peeling or cutting produce. Then, scrub the produce under running water, rubbing briskly with your hands and/or a vegetable brush if your produce has a firm skin.
NEWS
Lynn Little | May 14, 2013
A smoothie is a blended and sometimes sweetened beverage made from fresh fruit and perhaps chocolate or peanut butter. They can also contain milk, yogurt or ice cream. In addition to fruit, many smoothies include crushed ice, frozen fruit and honey. They have a milkshake-like consistency that is thicker than slush drinks. These thick, cold blender beverages are tasty, refreshing and, if made with the right ingredients, nutritious. Smoothies are easy to concoct with ingredients you have in your pantry and can be a great choice for a snack or mini-meal.
NEWS
Scott Anderson | Culinary Passion | May 2, 2013
This fresh, flavorful recipe is easy to make - if you are quick with a knife. I suggest using a very sharp knife, not trying to use a food processor or chopper because you run the risk of creating watermelon soup. Simply take a large slice out of a watermelon, about 1 to 1/2 inches thick, and cut the melon away from the rind and into small dice. The idea is to create a 3:1 ratio of watermelon to onion and pepper. If you have fresh corn, use one fresh, cooked ear, and cut the corn away from the cob. If you don't have or can't find fig balsamic vinegar, use a quality-aged balsamic.
NEWS
By ROXANN MILLER | roxann.miller@herald-mail.com | February 7, 2013
Dwight Mickey, co-owner of Shatzer's Fruit Market in Chambersburg, was named 2012 Grower of the Year by the State Horticultural Association of Pennsylvania. “This is what you call a lifetime achievement award. It's very prestigious. It's still sinking in,” Mickey said. He received the award Jan. 29 at the 2013 Mid-Atlantic Fruit and Vegetable Convention in Hershey, Pa. Mickey, 53, is one of less than half a dozen fruit growers in Franklin County to receive the award, said Maureen Irvin, executive secretary for the state association.
LIFESTYLE
December 26, 2012
On Nov. 17, the Waynesboro Seventh-day Adventist Church, 1 State Hill Road, held its 30th annual Festival of Praise, where the congregation brings a food offering to the front of the church.  In advance, the front of the church is decorated with large boxes of fresh fruits and vegetables and a Christmas tree decorated with paper angels, each angel containing the name of a child and what they would like for Christmas. “It's an amazing thing,” said longtime organizer Paulette Alexander of Shady Grove, Pa. “To see all the church members - adults and children alike - carrying their bags of groceries to the platform.”   As the church members bring their food gifts, and offerings, and thank-you notes, they also take a name or two from the tree to provide clothing and toy gifts for each child.  This year, the church provided for about 20 families and 44 children.
NEWS
Lynn Little | October 19, 2012
Who has time to think about what they're eating? Everyone, especially with the variety of convenient fruit and vegetable choices on the market today. As you experience increased time constraints from jobs, family and other commitments, a healthful diet is easy to overlook. In our hurried days, we don't always make the best food choices. However, it is possible to meet the demands of our busy lives and still make healthful food choices.  Eating enough fruits and vegetables each day is important to help you maintain your health.
NEWS
Lynn Little | July 24, 2012
Whether you're making a trip through the salad bar or creating your own salad at home, side and main dish salads can be a great way to eat more colorful fruits and veggies every day.  Green salads can be a powerhouse of nutrition; however, they also can become loaded with fat and calories if you're not careful.  • Begin with the greens. Gone are the days when green salad meant only iceberg lettuce. Today there are many types of greens available. Look for red leaf, red and green romaine, mixed greens, butterhead, spinach, kale, watercress and arugula.  Salad greens are a good source of many vitamins and minerals with the darker green leafy vegetables, such as spinach, romaine lettuce, watercress and arugula, generally containing more nutrients than paler varieties.
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