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Frank Buckles

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NEWS
By DAVE MCMILLION | davem@herald-mail.com | February 27, 2011
Frank Buckles, who was one of Jefferson County’s most famous citizens and was the last surviving U.S. veteran of World War I, died Sunday, according to a spokeswoman for a Washington, D.C., funeral home where Buckles’ body was being held Sunday night. Buckles, who lived in Charles Town, died at about 12:15 a.m. Sunday, but it was unclear if he was at home at the time, said Michelle Tanner, receptionist for Joseph Gawler’s Sons Inc., at 5130 Wisconsin Ave., N.W. No arrangements had been made as of late Sunday, Tanner said.
NEWS
By RICHARD F. BELISLE | richardb@herald-mail.com | February 28, 2011
Accolades streamed in Monday for Frank Buckles, America’s last surviving World War I veteran, who died shortly after midnight Sunday. He was 110. Several area residents who knew or befriended Buckles offered remembrances.   There was no word at press time Monday whether a resolution sponsored by 13 U.S. senators passed the Senate to allow Buckles’ body to lie in state in the Rotunda in the U.S. Capitol. According to the resolution, the ceremony would serve “as a tribute and recognition of all United States military members who served in the First World War.” The leading condolence honoring Buckles and remembering his surviving daughter, Susannah Buckles Flanagan, came from President Obama.
NEWS
By RICHARD F. BELISLE | richardb@herald-mail.com | March 10, 2011
America's last surviving World War I veteran will be buried at a private ceremony Tuesday at Arlington National Cemetery, a cemetery spokeswoman said Thursday. Frank Woodruff Buckles' remains will lie in honor in Arlington's Memorial Amphitheater on Tuesday from 8 a.m. to 3 p.m. President Obama has ordered U.S. flags to be flown at half-staff that day. Buckles, of Gap View Farm near Charles Town, died Feb. 27. He was 110. Area residents will be able to pay their respects to Buckles at a memorial service Wednesday at 2 p.m. at Zion Episcopal Church at 300 E. Congress St. Buckles was a longtime member of the church.
NEWS
By DAVID DELCORE | Barre (Vt.) Times Argus Staff Writer | May 19, 2011
It looks just like most any of the white marble headstones in Arlington (Va.) National Cemetery, but the one that rolled off the assembly line at Granite Industries of Vermont this week marks more than the end of a life. It marks the end of an era, according to GIV President Jeff Martell, who said the newly finished headstone will soon be shipped to Washington, D.C., where it will be placed on the grave of a man, who until February, was the last living U.S. participant in World War I. Frank Buckles of Charles Town, W.Va., was 110 when he died, and judging from his headstone — a simple monument that was sawed, cut, sandblasted and crated in Barre on Tuesday — he died just 26 days after his 110th birthday.
NEWS
November 2, 2009
WASHINGTON -- A congressional bill named for Jefferson County World War I veteran Frank Buckles would rededicate a World War I memorial in Washington, D.C., according to U.S. Sen. Jay Rockefeller, D-W.Va., one of the bill's sponsors. The District of Columbia built a memorial on the National Mall to honor 499 district residents who died in World War I, Rockefeller said in a news release. The Frank Buckles World War I Memorial Act would rededicate the District of Columbia War Memorial as the National and District of Columbia World War I Memorial, Rockefeller said in a press release.
NEWS
December 9, 2008
WILLIAMSPORT - "Doughboy Salute," a piece of music just commissioned for Frank Buckles - the last remaining U.S. veteran of WWI - will be performed at the Williamsport Community Band's holiday concert Sunday, Dec. 21, at 2 p.m. at Williamsport High School. Buckles, 107, from Charles Town, W.Va., and the composer, Kenny Bierschenk from Cincinnati, will attend. The piece is a collection of WWI songs with narration. It has been in the works since last summer.
OPINION
By U.S. Sen. Jay Rockefeller | March 23, 2011
I had the rare honor of participating in the events at Arlington National Cemetery to pay tribute to Frank Woodruff Buckles, the last surviving American World War I veteran and the representative of the lost generation of our "doughboys. " It was a moving afternoon, standing with so many on the knoll and seeing Frank Buckles buried in Section 34, in sight of Gen. Pershing's grave and among many other World War I veterans. I also thought about the American flags at half-staff in our embassies in the countries of our World War I allies.
NEWS
By RICHARD F. BELISLE | richardb@herald-mail.com | March 16, 2011
Editor's note: Reporter Richard F. Belisle's father, Frederick M. Belisle (1896-1981), served in the U.S. Navy in World War I. It seemed to all make sense, to finally come together Wednesday afternoon when Charlie Casabona led nearly 300 people in Zion Episcopal Church in the singing of "Over There. " Frank Woodruff Buckles, the last American to serve in World War I, died Feb. 27 at age 110. If he was relatively unknown before then he wasn't after weeks of mass-media coverage detailed his experience in the "War to End All Wars," his three-year ordeal in a Japanese prison camp in World War II and his life as a farmer, raconteur and father.
OPINION
February 4, 2011
Thumbs up to local, county and state road crews across the Tri-State area who worked during this week's ice storm and last week's snowstorm to keep our roads open. When storms hit, these folks work long hours in an effort to make travel not only possible, but as safe as possible under terrible conditions.       Thumbs down to those at the state level who did not provide the type of information to the news media that would have enabled people stuck on South Mountain and elsewhere in last week's snowstorm to be kept apprised of efforts to get traffic moving again.
ARTICLES BY DATE
OPINION
By ART CALLAHAM | November 20, 2011
I was humbled on Friday, Nov. 11, to speak to our community on Veterans Day, a day set aside to honor the service and sacrifices of those men and women who have served this great nation in the uniformed services. Most who know me and many who read this column know that I cherish the title “veteran” as dearly as Christian, husband, father and American. Veterans, over the years, have been saddled with a full range of characterizations by friends, foes and even by the citizens of the nation they serve.
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NEWS
By DAVID DELCORE | Barre (Vt.) Times Argus Staff Writer | May 19, 2011
It looks just like most any of the white marble headstones in Arlington (Va.) National Cemetery, but the one that rolled off the assembly line at Granite Industries of Vermont this week marks more than the end of a life. It marks the end of an era, according to GIV President Jeff Martell, who said the newly finished headstone will soon be shipped to Washington, D.C., where it will be placed on the grave of a man, who until February, was the last living U.S. participant in World War I. Frank Buckles of Charles Town, W.Va., was 110 when he died, and judging from his headstone — a simple monument that was sawed, cut, sandblasted and crated in Barre on Tuesday — he died just 26 days after his 110th birthday.
OPINION
By U.S. Sen. JAY ROCKEFELLER | March 24, 2011
I had the rare honor of participating in the events at Arlington National Cemetery to pay tribute to Frank Woodruff Buckles, the last surviving American World War I veteran and the representative of the lost generation of our “doughboys.” It was a moving afternoon, standing with so many on the knoll and seeing Frank Buckles buried in Section 34, in sight of Gen. Pershing’s grave and among many other World War I veterans. I also thought about the American flags at half-staff in our embassies in the countries of our World War I allies.
NEWS
By RICHARD F. BELISLE | richardb@herald-mail.com | March 16, 2011
Editor's note: Reporter Richard F. Belisle's father, Frederick M. Belisle (1896-1981), served in the U.S. Navy in World War I. It seemed to all make sense, to finally come together Wednesday afternoon when Charlie Casabona led nearly 300 people in Zion Episcopal Church in the singing of "Over There. " Frank Woodruff Buckles, the last American to serve in World War I, died Feb. 27 at age 110. If he was relatively unknown before then he wasn't after weeks of mass-media coverage detailed his experience in the "War to End All Wars," his three-year ordeal in a Japanese prison camp in World War II and his life as a farmer, raconteur and father.
NEWS
By RICHARD F. BELISLE | richardb@herald-mail.com | March 10, 2011
America's last surviving World War I veteran will be buried at a private ceremony Tuesday at Arlington National Cemetery, a cemetery spokeswoman said Thursday. Frank Woodruff Buckles' remains will lie in honor in Arlington's Memorial Amphitheater on Tuesday from 8 a.m. to 3 p.m. President Obama has ordered U.S. flags to be flown at half-staff that day. Buckles, of Gap View Farm near Charles Town, died Feb. 27. He was 110. Area residents will be able to pay their respects to Buckles at a memorial service Wednesday at 2 p.m. at Zion Episcopal Church at 300 E. Congress St. Buckles was a longtime member of the church.
NEWS
By RICHARD F. BELISLE | richardb@herald-mail.com | February 28, 2011
Accolades streamed in Monday for Frank Buckles, America’s last surviving World War I veteran, who died shortly after midnight Sunday. He was 110. Several area residents who knew or befriended Buckles offered remembrances.   There was no word at press time Monday whether a resolution sponsored by 13 U.S. senators passed the Senate to allow Buckles’ body to lie in state in the Rotunda in the U.S. Capitol. According to the resolution, the ceremony would serve “as a tribute and recognition of all United States military members who served in the First World War.” The leading condolence honoring Buckles and remembering his surviving daughter, Susannah Buckles Flanagan, came from President Obama.
NEWS
By DAVE MCMILLION | davem@herald-mail.com | February 27, 2011
Frank Buckles, who was one of Jefferson County’s most famous citizens and was the last surviving U.S. veteran of World War I, died Sunday, according to a spokeswoman for a Washington, D.C., funeral home where Buckles’ body was being held Sunday night. Buckles, who lived in Charles Town, died at about 12:15 a.m. Sunday, but it was unclear if he was at home at the time, said Michelle Tanner, receptionist for Joseph Gawler’s Sons Inc., at 5130 Wisconsin Ave., N.W. No arrangements had been made as of late Sunday, Tanner said.
OPINION
February 4, 2011
Thumbs up to local, county and state road crews across the Tri-State area who worked during this week's ice storm and last week's snowstorm to keep our roads open. When storms hit, these folks work long hours in an effort to make travel not only possible, but as safe as possible under terrible conditions.       Thumbs down to those at the state level who did not provide the type of information to the news media that would have enabled people stuck on South Mountain and elsewhere in last week's snowstorm to be kept apprised of efforts to get traffic moving again.
NEWS
November 2, 2009
WASHINGTON -- A congressional bill named for Jefferson County World War I veteran Frank Buckles would rededicate a World War I memorial in Washington, D.C., according to U.S. Sen. Jay Rockefeller, D-W.Va., one of the bill's sponsors. The District of Columbia built a memorial on the National Mall to honor 499 district residents who died in World War I, Rockefeller said in a news release. The Frank Buckles World War I Memorial Act would rededicate the District of Columbia War Memorial as the National and District of Columbia World War I Memorial, Rockefeller said in a press release.
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