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Fort Frederick State Park

NEWS
By KAREN HANNA | October 30, 2006
WASHINGTON COUNTY - Motorists should be on the lookout for deer as the weather turns cold and the animals' thoughts turn to mating, officials said. "They have one thing on the mind, and it is not oncoming traffic," Washington County Sheriff's Department Sgt. Daniel Faith said Sunday. According to AAA Mid-Atlantic, about 1.5 million crashes involving deer occur every year. About 155 people die in those accidents. Last year, deer were involved in 2,341 crashes in Pennsylvania that killed nine people.
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NEWS
BY DAN KULIN /Staff Writer | April 26, 2002
dank@herald-mail.com Frank Davis wasn't wearing any pants, and Leon Salisbury wore a wolf's-head hat, but it was the few people in so-called normal clothes who seemed out of place at Fort Frederick State Park on Thursday. Davis and Salisbury were among the hundreds of people in "period" dress at the park for the first day of the Eighth annual Market Fair and Rifle Frolic, which runs through Sunday. Instead of pants, Davis was wearing leather leggings and a cloth called a breech clout, which he described as Indian-style clothing from the 1750s.
NEWS
By DAN KULIN /Staff Writer | May 29, 1999
BIG POOL - In temperatures above 80 degrees, about 150 re-enactors dressed in wool coats and leggings reminiscent of the 1750s marched around Fort Frederick and re-created typical woodland skirmishes outside the stone walls of the fort Saturday afternoon. For Jim Rogers, dressed as a drummer for the Maryland forces, the 25th annual French and Indian War Muster at Fort Frederick is a great way for him and his family to learn and live history. Thanks to his father, Rogers said he has been involved in re-enactments since he was 5 years old. Now, at 28, he brings his wife and children along.
NEWS
By MARLO BARNHART | November 7, 1998
BIG POOL, Md. - Nearly two dozen muzzleloading enthusiasts braved blustery fall winds and a fickle sun Saturday on the first day of a weekend shoot, all to practice their hobby at Fort Frederick State Park. It's not an avocation for everyone. It takes a good eye, a steady hand and patience ... above all, patience. "I enjoy muzzleloading all year long," said Grayson Babington of Clear Spring. And his love of the hobby has been part of his life for 30 years. Saturday, Babington was shooting with friends, George Fisher of Clear Spring, and Les Boyd of Frederick, Md. After one particular round, Babington produced his paper turkey target to park officials with several bull's-eyes to the head.
NEWS
by GREGORY T. SIMMONS | April 24, 2005
gregs@herald-mail.com BIG POOL - Tom Kerling stood aside from the dozen or so troops he was commanding before he began calling out orders Saturday at Fort Frederick State Park. Kerling, 31, of Westernport, Md., wore the clothes of a British sergeant during the French and Indian War, complete with red coat, black three-point hat and white stockings, and explained to the crowd of spectators the different ways a muzzle-loading rifle could be used. Of course, it could be fired.
NEWS
by MARLO BARNHART | May 28, 2006
BIG POOL - Granted, everyone who came to Fort Frederick State Park for the 250th anniversary weekend celebration was surrounded by the history of the place. But for the Williams family, it wasn't just any history - it is their history, too. For 54 years beginning just before the Civil War and lasting into the early 1900s, the Nathan Williams family owned and farmed the land on which Fort Frederick stands. "We came here for this from New Jersey," said Jean Johnson, wife of Donald Johnson, whose mother was a Williams.
NEWS
by ANDREA ROWLAND | April 22, 2004
andrear@herald-mail.com Two Tri-State area forts will open their gates to traders, trappers, soldiers and civilians during 18th-century market fair celebrations today through Sunday. Historically, the market fair was a few-day-long gathering to trade, buy and sell crafts, furs, produce, clothing, fabric and other supplies needed for the year to come. Participants also showcased their frontier and shooting skills, swapped tales of adventure and shared news from the Colonies, according to information from the Great North American Rendezvous Web site at www.gnarendezvous.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 20, 2012
1. A trip back in time Fort Frederick State Park hosts its annual 18th-Century Market Fair. The fair includes artisans, craftspeople and sutlers and an 18th-century encampment. The fort will be open 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Thursday, April 26, Friday, April 27, and Saturday, April 28; 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. Sunday, April 29. The fort is at 11100 Fort Frederick Road, Big Pool. Admission is $3; $2, ages 6 to 12; free for ages 5 and younger. Call 301-842-2155 or go to www.friendsoffortfrederick.info.
NEWS
by PEPPER BALLARD | May 29, 2005
pepperb@herald-mail.com BIG POOL - Nine-year-old Daniel Rogers, sitting on a wooden bench Saturday inside Fort Frederick's imposing stone walls, twirled a toy pistol in his hands as his friend shifted a toy rifle between his shoulders. The Savage, Md., youngster is no stranger to the fort - his grandfather, Jim Rogers, is its former historian. Saturday, Daniel said, marked the ninth time he has attended the annual French and Indian War Muster at Fort Frederick State Park.
NEWS
by GREGORY T. SIMMONS | April 24, 2004
gregs@herald-mail.com BIG POOL - The smell of animal skin, burning pipe tobacco and possibly bare feet normally may have turned away more than a few customers, but Ernie Marvin had a steady flow of prospective buyers Friday morning. Marvin was selling animal pelts of all shapes, sizes and cuts at the 10th annual 18th Century Market Fair at Fort Frederick State Park. Underneath a tent and with nothing between his feet and the bare earth but a few blades of grass, Marvin puffed a pipe as he explained what brought him to the event from Michigan.
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