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Fort Frederick

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By PAT SCHOOLEY | Special to The Herald-Mail | April 15, 2012
This is the 192nd in a series of articles about the historical and architectural treasures of Washington County. The French and Indian War, the New World extension of a great European conflict between England and France, arrived in Maryland on July 9, 1755. Gen. Edward Braddock, commander in chief of British Colonial forces, fought with French forces near Fort Duquesne, which was located at the confluence of the Allegheny and Monongahela rivers. The British defeat and death of Braddock opened the area to savage attacks upon the farmers who had moved to the frontiers of Maryland.
NEWS
By ALLAN POWELL | May 14, 2010
In films, books and essays, it is claimed that Hessian prisoners of war were incarcerated at Fort Frederick during the American Revolution. Writers about this issue have no reluctance about making direct statements in the affirmative. Nonetheless, after several years devoted to the verification of this "fact," I have not found any reliable evidence for agreement. One important technical fact well known to all writers of history is that you have a footnote to show the authority of your sources.
NEWS
September 19, 2005
BIG POOL - Rich, green pine trees dot the sides of the road that lead to a fort with four 120-foot-long walls. Each of those huge limestone walls forms an arrow point at the end. Two renovated buildings make up the east and west barracks in the fort; the east one is the museum. Gov. Horatio Sharpe ordered the fort built in 1754 to protect the western front in the French and Indian War. In 1763, American Indian Chief Pontiac staged a rebellion, and the fort provided shelter for civilians and other militia.
LIFESTYLE
By SUSAN FAIR | Special to The Herald-Mail | October 14, 2012
It was a harrowing time to live in Western Maryland. As the French and Indian War raged, hapless settlers found themselves in the midst of raids so fearsome that a fort was needed - one with stone walls 4 feet thick and 20 feet high in places - in which they could take refuge from the terrifying attacks.  Today this fort - now part of Fort Frederick State Park - is host to many activities designed to get folks acquainted with the history of...
LIFESTYLE
By JESSICA MANUEL | Special to The Herald-Mail | April 24, 2013
Music played, stories told, historical items sold: A lot happens at the 18th Century Market Fair at Fort Frederick, but one man knows about it more than anyone. Chris Holmgren of Dickerson, Md., is a longtime volunteer and artisan featured at the fair. He does more than his share to keep the past alive. The Friends of Fort Frederick took over the Market Fair after its initial 11-year run, and Holmgren has been there since the host change.  “We didn't want to see it end,” he said.
NEWS
September 27, 2007
The Maryland Department of Natural Resources, Maryland Park Service will host a special living history program featuring "Joshua Beall's Company of the Maryland Forces," this comng weekend. The "Garrison" Weekend will feature volunteers who will demonstrate the life of soldiers at Fort Frederick during the French and Indian War. The war, which was fought between 1756 and 1763, changed the landscape and fabric of the North American continent. The war, which pitched the French and their Indian allies against the British and their Indian allies, brought destruction to the Maryland frontier.
NEWS
July 26, 1997
By MARLO BARNHART Staff Writer INDIAN SPRINGS, Md. - The prospect of seeing a Revolutionary War re-enactment Saturday brought Neila Harrigan to Fort Frederick from her home in Charles Town, W.Va. "We've been to Civil War battles before but never any from the Revolutionary War," Harrigan said. Harrigan and her family were among the several hundred spectators who braved the heat Saturday for the first day of Revolution and Remembrance '97. Today, the British and American troop camps will again be open at 10 a.m. to the public.
NEWS
October 11, 1999
The treasurer of the Friends of Fort Frederick withdrew her resignation and two new officers were elected during a meeting Monday evening. Katy Grosh of Hagerstown was reinstated as treasurer; Chas. Rittenhouse of Boonsboro was named president and Bill Weaver of Boonsboro was named vice president of the volunteer organization that supports the state park. During a meeting on Sept. 14, Scott Allen, president; Kenny Moore, vice president; Grosh; and Gary Dyson, secretary, resigned.
NEWS
by TARA REILLY | July 5, 2003
tarar@herald-mail.com A Fort Frederick State Park official said this week a popular annual event will be scaled back next year because the event's main organizer has decided to no longer put it on. The Patuxents, which have organized the 18th-century Market Fair and Rifle Frolic for the last nine years, told park officials on May 23 that it would no longer participate in the event. The event is intended to give visitors a chance to experience life as it was on the frontier from 1640 through 1840.
NEWS
By DAN DEARTH | March 13, 2008
BIG POOL -- The Washington County Board of Zoning Appeals on Wednesday approved a special exception that would permit a 199-foot-high communication tower to be built near Fort Frederick, Assistant County Attorney Kirk C. Downey said. He said Vista PCS LLC, a private company, sought the special exception to build the tower near the 18th-century fort so Verizon could satisfy a gap in service coverage. The tower would be raised in the 11000 block of Gehr Road, according to county documents.
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OBITUARIES
August 13, 2013
Arthur Leonard Lucas, 86, of Hancock, Md., died Monday, Aug. 12, 2013, at Meritus Medical Center near Hagerstown, Md. Born April 10, 1927, in Warfordsburg, Pa., he was the son of the late Richard Lee and Margaret Elizabeth Hill Lucas, and the husband of Idella Vernedia Trail Lucas, who died Aug. 21, 2008. He was a veteran of World War II, serving in the U.S. Navy. He retired in 1989 as a superintendent for Maryland State Park Service at Fort Frederick. He is survived by one son, Arthur Norty Lucas of Big Pool, Md.; six grandsons, Marty Adams, Randy Adams, Darren Lucas, Devin Lucas, Dereck Wollaston and Shane Wollaston; and two great-grandsons, Joshua and Trenton Lucas.
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NEWS
By CALEB CALHOUN | caleb.calhoun@herald-mail.com | July 18, 2013
A group of youngsters this week has been learning first-hand about nature, from the weather to river runoff, as participants in the Fort Frederick State Park Junior Ranger Program. On Tuesday, they were studying fossils, digging up what they could find and learning how to extract fossils from rocks. Emma Schnebly, 10, of Clear Spring said that she enjoyed the experiments and looking for fossils. “There's so much fun stuff to do,” she said. “It's cool projects, but it's explaining something to you so you learn something.” Six youngsters between the ages of 8 and 12 are enrolled in the program at the state park this week, which began Monday and runs through Friday at the Nature Center.
NEWS
Anne Weatherholt | Around Hancock | June 20, 2013
It's only a little more than a week until Hancock's 11th annual Barge Bash sets sail again along the historic Chesapeake and Ohio Canal on Saturday, June 29.  This unique local festival takes advantage of the narrow space where Main Street, the Western Maryland Rail Trail, and the C&O Canal, run parallel to each other in a very small space. Local organizations provide food; there is entertainment from local musicians, and there are historical exhibits from the National Park Service and other organizations.
NEWS
Anne Weatherholt | Around Hancock | June 6, 2013
Hancock is the place to be this weekend. There will be not one, but two festivals in Widmeyer Park. On Saturday, Hancock in Motion sponsors a community festival beginning at 11 a.m. The festival will feature crafters, a yard sale, home party reps and wood carvings. Also planned are kids' games, cake walks, raffles and a chicken wing-eating contest. Food vendors will feature sandwiches, boardwalk fries, crab balls, funnel cakes, ice cream sandwiches, nachos, smoothies and more.
NEWS
Linda Irvin-Craig | April 27, 2013
"Rediscover America 1976 Bicentennial Celebration, United States of America-Washington County, Maryland, 1776-1976" was the full name of an event that would involve most of the members of the Washington County Historical Society and the community, as a whole, for most of 1976. An executive committee and large sub-committees were established to manage the events and coordinate with the state and other area venues. On the executive committee were Robert and Marianne Zeigler and Paul and Ruth Horst, as general co-chairmen; Edward O'Brien, treasurer; Robert Statton, secretary; Robert Hill, assistant secretary; Franklin Miller, headquarters chair; Robert M. Hedges, Rediscover America Shoppe manager; John and Betty Seburn, student activities coordinators; Jim Wilson, decorations; Howard Kaylor, operating capital; Al Twiss, insurance; and Ted and Janice Reeder, revenue division.
NEWS
By ALICIA NOTARIANNI | alnotarianni@aol.com | April 27, 2013
Traders pulled primitive carts full of wares across fields in the cool morning air. Servants used long sticks to stir stew in sturdy black pots, and a town crier announced an auction to take place after noon. The wistful tunes of a fife sailed in the breeze as young girls in bonnets frolicked Saturday morning near a 1756 stone fort. It was the 19th year of the Friends of Fort Frederick State Park's 18th Century Market Fair, where re-enactors and vendors known as sutlers gather from across the United States to remember and celebrate colonial life.
LIFESTYLE
By JESSICA MANUEL | Special to The Herald-Mail | April 24, 2013
Music played, stories told, historical items sold: A lot happens at the 18th Century Market Fair at Fort Frederick, but one man knows about it more than anyone. Chris Holmgren of Dickerson, Md., is a longtime volunteer and artisan featured at the fair. He does more than his share to keep the past alive. The Friends of Fort Frederick took over the Market Fair after its initial 11-year run, and Holmgren has been there since the host change.  “We didn't want to see it end,” he said.
NEWS
Linda Irvin-Craig | November 21, 2012
The weekend of the 150th anniversary of the Battle of Antietam, they came from North Dakota, Texas, Massachusetts, Virginia, West Virginia, Pennsylvania and Nebraska, which had the largest contingency, and met with an equal number from Maryland to experience the anniversary and much more. These families all had a common ancestor from Washington County and they were here to celebrate their personal history, as well. This common ancestor, Henry Eavey, entered the colonies in 1732 through Philadelphia, migrated into Maryland very soon thereafter and Washington County (actually Prince George's County at the time)
LIFESTYLE
By SUSAN FAIR | Special to The Herald-Mail | October 14, 2012
It was a harrowing time to live in Western Maryland. As the French and Indian War raged, hapless settlers found themselves in the midst of raids so fearsome that a fort was needed - one with stone walls 4 feet thick and 20 feet high in places - in which they could take refuge from the terrifying attacks.  Today this fort - now part of Fort Frederick State Park - is host to many activities designed to get folks acquainted with the history of...
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