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NEWS
By JENNIFER FITCH | April 27, 2009
ROUZERVILLE, Pa. -- First actions taken at Monday's mountain fire in Washington Township, Pa., involved first responders identifying the affected area's boundaries, four main points for their attack and ways to access the forest with equipment. "With these kinds of fires, it takes time to get people assembled," Blue Ridge (Pa.) Fire Chief Jim Meek said. All firefighters must take a class that trains them for forest fires, and many in local departments have experienced them before, he said.
NEWS
by RICHARD BELISLE | August 16, 2002
waynesboro@herald-mail.com Soaring temperatures coupled with a lack of rain has turned Franklin County's fields and woods into tinder and prompted the County Commissioners to order a ban on all outside burning. The ban goes into effect at 3 p.m. Saturday, County Commissioner Bob Thomas said Thursday. It affects all 22 townships and boroughs in the county. "This means there will be no open burning, period," Thomas said. Violation of the ban can bring a $100 fine for a first offense.
NEWS
by ERIN CUNNINGHAM | March 24, 2006
TRI-STATE Unusually dry weather has prompted Washington and Frederick counties to limit the number of outdoor burning permits they issue. Washington County does not have a ban on outdoor burning, but the health department is judging applications for burning permits on a case-by-case basis. Director of Environmental Health Ted Gordon said people who already have permits may burn. "We're taking into consideration the fact that we are in a drought status and (Maryland Department of Natural Resources)
NEWS
December 26, 1998
BY KIMBERLY YAKOWSKI / Staff Writer The burning ban for Washington, Frederick and Allegany counties was lifted earlier this week by officials with the Department of Natural Resources Forest Service. The area remains in a drought. However, recent cold temperatures and rain and snow that fell this week were reason enough to end the ban, said DNR Regional Fire Manager Ric Lillard. Lillard said the decision was made Friday morning following discussions with state and regional forest managers.
NEWS
by TIM ROWLAND | May 25, 2006
Editor's Note: Tim Rowland is on vacation. This column first appeared June 9, 2003. LAKE (NOT THE ONE IN THE GATOR MOVIE) PLACID, N.Y. - This place is about as far from anything political as you can get, which is one of the reasons I come here. It's in the heart of a massive wilderness protected by the New York state constitution, so Bush's buddies can't pave it and Daschle's buddies can't tax it. So, basically, no one pays it any mind. Oh, you might be subject to a good environmentalist rant every now and then, but even these are generally limited to whether it is ethical or not to use a piece of surveyor's ribbon to mark a trail.
NEWS
by TIM ROWLAND | June 10, 2003
LAKE (NOT THE ONE IN THE GATOR MOVIE) PLACID, N.Y. - This place is about as far from anything political as you can get, which is one of the reasons I come here. It's in the heart of a massive wilderness protected by the New York state constitution, so Bush's buddies can't pave it and Daschle's buddies can't tax it. So basically no one pays it any mind. Oh, you may be subject to a good environmentalist rant now and then, but even these are generally limited to whether or not it is ethical to use a piece of surveyor's ribbon to mark a trail.
NEWS
October 20, 2007
Thumbs up to Robert Petties, a retired police officer, for volunteering six to seven hours each day to keep the programs at Hagers-town's Memorial Recreation Center up and running. The center, at 109 W. North St., has been without full-time leadership since former director Kim Buchanan left to take another job in September. Petties, who joined the center's board this spring, said it was "a chance to try to make a difference. " Thank you, sir. Thumbs down to Michael Mukasey, a nominee for U.S. attorney general, for his refusal to disavow "waterboarding" and other harsh interrogation techniques.
NEWS
July 13, 1997
By BRENDAN KIRBY Staff Writer Parks and campgrounds in the Tri-State area are operating under normal rules, but the hot, dry weather could soon trigger restrictions on outdoor fires, officials said Sunday. Normally campers and hikers can cook on grills in federal and state parks and build campfires in designated areas, according to officials who maintain the parks. Patricia Manown, a spokeswoman for the Maryland Department of Natural Resources, said the state has banned all outdoor fires during especially dry summers, when forest fires start more easily and spread quickly.
NEWS
April 5, 2009
Not every industry out there is hurting, and not every stock is in the tank. If you invested in AutoZone last November, congratulations - you have doubled your money. Likewise, it's a good time to be selling vegetable plants and seeds. A mail-order clerk for Burpee said that spring, obviously, is always a solid time of year for seeds, but this year it's "blown up. " National organizations expect there to be a 20 percent increase in home gardens this year. And, if sales are any indication, more guys are remembering that they changed the oil in their old Chevy Impalas when they were teenagers, so there is no reason why they can't do the same today.
NEWS
March 29, 2009
By Thomas Voting Reports WASHINGTON - Here's how area members of Congress voted on major roll call votes in the week ending March 27. HOUSE Public lands conservation Voting 285 for and 140 against, the House on March 25 sent President Obama a bill (HR 146) that would conserve tens of millions of acres of public land, mostly in the West. The bill would protect 2.1 million acres in California, Colorado, Idaho, Michigan, New Mexico, Oregon, Utah, Virginia and West Virginia as wilderness; add 26 million acres to the National Landscape Conservation System; preserve 2,800 miles of federal trails; and add three units to the National Park System.
ARTICLES BY DATE
BREAKINGNEWS
By JULIE E. GREENE | julieg@herald-mail.com | November 25, 2012
Maryland Department of Natural Resources firefighters are expected to spend all day Monday at the scene of an ongoing forest fire in the Indian Springs Wildlife Management Area, the third day of the fire that reached an estimated 100 acres at the point of containment Sunday afternoon, Maryland Department of Natural Resources officials said. “It will continue to smoke all day” Monday, said Ric Lillard, regional fire manager with the Maryland Department of Natural Resources' Forest Service.
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NEWS
By JENNIFER FITCH | April 27, 2009
ROUZERVILLE, Pa. -- First actions taken at Monday's mountain fire in Washington Township, Pa., involved first responders identifying the affected area's boundaries, four main points for their attack and ways to access the forest with equipment. "With these kinds of fires, it takes time to get people assembled," Blue Ridge (Pa.) Fire Chief Jim Meek said. All firefighters must take a class that trains them for forest fires, and many in local departments have experienced them before, he said.
NEWS
April 5, 2009
Not every industry out there is hurting, and not every stock is in the tank. If you invested in AutoZone last November, congratulations - you have doubled your money. Likewise, it's a good time to be selling vegetable plants and seeds. A mail-order clerk for Burpee said that spring, obviously, is always a solid time of year for seeds, but this year it's "blown up. " National organizations expect there to be a 20 percent increase in home gardens this year. And, if sales are any indication, more guys are remembering that they changed the oil in their old Chevy Impalas when they were teenagers, so there is no reason why they can't do the same today.
NEWS
March 29, 2009
By Thomas Voting Reports WASHINGTON - Here's how area members of Congress voted on major roll call votes in the week ending March 27. HOUSE Public lands conservation Voting 285 for and 140 against, the House on March 25 sent President Obama a bill (HR 146) that would conserve tens of millions of acres of public land, mostly in the West. The bill would protect 2.1 million acres in California, Colorado, Idaho, Michigan, New Mexico, Oregon, Utah, Virginia and West Virginia as wilderness; add 26 million acres to the National Landscape Conservation System; preserve 2,800 miles of federal trails; and add three units to the National Park System.
NEWS
October 20, 2007
Thumbs up to Robert Petties, a retired police officer, for volunteering six to seven hours each day to keep the programs at Hagers-town's Memorial Recreation Center up and running. The center, at 109 W. North St., has been without full-time leadership since former director Kim Buchanan left to take another job in September. Petties, who joined the center's board this spring, said it was "a chance to try to make a difference. " Thank you, sir. Thumbs down to Michael Mukasey, a nominee for U.S. attorney general, for his refusal to disavow "waterboarding" and other harsh interrogation techniques.
NEWS
by TIM ROWLAND | May 25, 2006
Editor's Note: Tim Rowland is on vacation. This column first appeared June 9, 2003. LAKE (NOT THE ONE IN THE GATOR MOVIE) PLACID, N.Y. - This place is about as far from anything political as you can get, which is one of the reasons I come here. It's in the heart of a massive wilderness protected by the New York state constitution, so Bush's buddies can't pave it and Daschle's buddies can't tax it. So, basically, no one pays it any mind. Oh, you might be subject to a good environmentalist rant every now and then, but even these are generally limited to whether it is ethical or not to use a piece of surveyor's ribbon to mark a trail.
NEWS
by ERIN CUNNINGHAM | March 24, 2006
TRI-STATE Unusually dry weather has prompted Washington and Frederick counties to limit the number of outdoor burning permits they issue. Washington County does not have a ban on outdoor burning, but the health department is judging applications for burning permits on a case-by-case basis. Director of Environmental Health Ted Gordon said people who already have permits may burn. "We're taking into consideration the fact that we are in a drought status and (Maryland Department of Natural Resources)
NEWS
by TIM ROWLAND | June 10, 2003
LAKE (NOT THE ONE IN THE GATOR MOVIE) PLACID, N.Y. - This place is about as far from anything political as you can get, which is one of the reasons I come here. It's in the heart of a massive wilderness protected by the New York state constitution, so Bush's buddies can't pave it and Daschle's buddies can't tax it. So basically no one pays it any mind. Oh, you may be subject to a good environmentalist rant now and then, but even these are generally limited to whether or not it is ethical to use a piece of surveyor's ribbon to mark a trail.
NEWS
by RICHARD BELISLE | August 16, 2002
waynesboro@herald-mail.com Soaring temperatures coupled with a lack of rain has turned Franklin County's fields and woods into tinder and prompted the County Commissioners to order a ban on all outside burning. The ban goes into effect at 3 p.m. Saturday, County Commissioner Bob Thomas said Thursday. It affects all 22 townships and boroughs in the county. "This means there will be no open burning, period," Thomas said. Violation of the ban can bring a $100 fine for a first offense.
NEWS
December 26, 1998
BY KIMBERLY YAKOWSKI / Staff Writer The burning ban for Washington, Frederick and Allegany counties was lifted earlier this week by officials with the Department of Natural Resources Forest Service. The area remains in a drought. However, recent cold temperatures and rain and snow that fell this week were reason enough to end the ban, said DNR Regional Fire Manager Ric Lillard. Lillard said the decision was made Friday morning following discussions with state and regional forest managers.
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