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NEWS
by LYNN F. LITTLE | July 13, 2005
Growing interest in gardening and farmers markets, a desire to increase the number of fruit and vegetable servings, and popular television food shows are stimulating interest in home cooking and food preservation. Home food preservation, canning and freezing, require some time, but advances in food safety, science and technology have simplified the process of preserving summer-fresh fruits and vegetables at home. With proper planning and equipment, home food preservation is relatively straightforward.
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NEWS
by Lynn Little | June 15, 2005
Hamburgers are one of the most popular meats found on home grills. Following a few simple tips and techniques can help you build a better burger in terms of nutritional value and food safety. You can improve the nutritional value of the hamburger by using some of the advice found in the new U.S. Dietary Guidelines and MyPyramid. Use a whole-grain bun as the foundation for the sandwich. A regular-sized hamburger bun weighs 2 ounces and counts as two servings from the bread and grain group.
NEWS
by LYNN F. LITTLE | October 6, 2004
How often do you think about the safety of the food you are preparing or eating? Do you just assume that if food is available to eat, it must be safe? Being aware starts with keeping the four steps of food safety in mind: Clean, separate, cook and chill. Clean Wash hands and surfaces often. Cleanliness is a major factor in preventing foodborne illness. Bacteria introduced by humans, pets or foods can easily spread throughout the kitchen and get onto cutting boards, utensils, sponges and countertops.
NEWS
by KATE COLEMAN | September 1, 2004
katec@herald-mail.com Although summer doesn't officially end until Sept. 21, for many, Labor Day marks the season's close. There's still plenty of time to fire up the grill. If you're burned out on the usual - burgers, dogs and barbecued chicken, cast about for something different. How about fish? Elbert O'Keeffe, a longtime member of Antietam Fly Anglers, a 100-plus member fly-fishing club, hasn't eaten a fish he's caught for years. He's a catch-and-release man, fishing for the sport of it. When he did eat fish he caught, O'Keeffe kept cooking simple: Clean them, open them up, put them on the grill.
NEWS
by LYNN F. LITTLE | June 23, 2004
The number of food-borne illnesses increases during the summer. Bacteria love the hot, humid days of summer and grow faster then than at any other time of the year. At the same time temperatures rise, we're more likely to leave food unrefrigerated for longer time periods. Food sits out at picnics, barbecues and during travel. Washing facilities and thermostat-controlled cooking appliances often are not available at picnic sites. People may leave their food thermometer in their kitchen when cooking outdoors.
NEWS
by LYNN F. LITTLE | May 12, 2004
Grilling, one of the easiest low-fat cooking methods, can be a centerpiece for warm-weather meals. While the art of grilling may come with practice, here are some pointers for a successful experience.Bring out the barbecue. Grills need annual cleaning after winter storage. Scour the grate with a wire brush. Spray the grid with oven cleaner and rinse thoroughly. Before each use, apply nonstick cooking spray to prevent food from sticking to the grill. Stock up on charcoal Quality charcoal briquettes light quickly and have a long burn life.
NEWS
by LYNN F. LITTLE | April 28, 2004
Food safety mistakes often run in families. Old habits can jeopardize food safety, health and life itself. Each year, millions of people are sickened by foodborne illness. Thousands die. Food safety errors that occur during processing and marketing make front page news, particularly when the errors prompt recalls. Food safety is, however, a responsibility that we all share - many food safety mistakes occur in our family kitchens. To learn more about frequent food safety mistakes, test your food safety IQ with these questions: Q: Is setting froszen meat on the counter the best method to thaw it?
NEWS
by LYNN F. LITTLE | April 21, 2004
Leftovers can simplify meal preparation to a point where experienced cooks often cook more than needed so they can have several meals with minimal effort. Planning for leftovers can stretch meal and food dollars. When saving leftovers, consider packaging in single servings. These can be handy for lunch and snacks and also good when added to soups and stews. Combine several single-serving containers of leftovers such as spaghetti sauce to complete a family meal. Some tips to keep leftovers safe include: Cool food in the refrigerator and not on the kitchen counter.
NEWS
by KATE COLEMAN | April 1, 2004
katec@herald-mail.com Spring is here. So what are you going to do about it? You could start your spring cleaning. Or you can do something fun - something that you thought about doing in January - or something you've never considered. Here are 10 suggestions: Park it The Tri-State area has parks aplenty. There is nature, there are swings, there is history. Visit City Park in downtown Hagerstown, the woods of Franklin County, Pa.'s Caledonia State Park or Harpers Ferry National Historical Park in nearby West Virginia.
NEWS
by LYNN F. LITTLE | September 24, 2003
Making a couple of extra stops on the way home from the grocery store? Not putting leftovers away until your favorite show is over? All these practices test the limits of how long food can be safely stored. Here are some safe food storage tips from the Center for Food Safety and Applied Nutrition: Don't delay. Refrigerate or freeze perishables right away after picking them up from the grocery store or deli. Keep it cool. Use a refrigerator/freezer thermometer to make sure your refrigerator is between 35 degrees and 40 degrees and your freezer is below zero degrees.
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