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NEWS
By LYNN LITTLE | November 21, 2007
The Thanksgiving menu, turkey, dressing, mashed potatoes and gravy, along with many side dishes, is very much the same from year to year. Two food-safety recommendations for cooking the meal have changed. The U.S. Department of Agriculture's Food Safety and Inspection Service has eliminated the recommendation for washing raw meat and poultry, including raw turkey, before placing it in the oven. It also adjusted the cooked temperature to 165 degrees for all poultry products. The practice of rinsing the raw turkey in cool running water is no longer recommended.
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NEWS
By ARNOLD S. PLATOU | November 11, 2007
There has to be a better way, thought Roy Romsburg, as he gingerly replaced hot pans of food on the buffet line at Western Sizzlin Steakhouse near Hagerstown. "I would always use a rag to pull the steam table pans out of the hot wells and, as I'm doing this in front of customers I'm thinking, 'I can't believe I'm putting this rag near food," Romsburg recalled. "...You know what people do with rags!'" And so, about three years ago, came the spark of an idea. Romsburg, now 33, told his brother, Paul Romsburg Jr., 36, and their father, Paul Sr., 61, - all owners of the local Sizzlin franchise - that there had to be a product somewhere that would allow them to safely and sanitarily remove and replace food pans.
NEWS
By TIFFANY ARNOLD | July 30, 2007
It seems obvious to say eating food off the floor is wrong. As is double-dipping. Now, scientific studies back what most had taken as fact. A study published in the Journal of Applied Microbiology earlier this year debunked the unwritten five-second rule, which states that it's OK to eat food off the floor as long as it's done in five seconds or less. The same researchers behind that study have just wrapped up another study that suggests double-dipping - biting off a piece of food and placing the bitten end into a container of dip - leads to more germs.
NEWS
By LYNN LITTLE | June 27, 2007
Violent storms can happen quickly and unexpectedly during the summer. When that happens, many people wonder about the safety of refrigerated and frozen foods if their home has been without power. Monitoring food storage temperatures can be especially important then. At the same time, opening freezer and refrigerator doors during an outage should be kept to a minimum. Food-safety experts recommend checking food storage temperatures every four hours. The key temperature is 40 degrees.
NEWS
by LYNN F. LITTLE | March 21, 2007
"Eat this; don't eat that. " If only it were so simple. Eating a variety of foods is recommended for health, but trying to overhaul your or your family's eating habits can be a challenge. Food likes, dislikes and eating habits can date back to a person's childhood. If Daddy didn't like peas, chances are little Seth didn't grow up liking them, either. The good news is that it's never too late to start eating a greater variety of foods that contribute to good health. Aim for gradual changes, rather than making an issue of food.
NEWS
by LYNN F. LITTLE | September 13, 2006
When children take their lunch to school, make good nutrition a priority and involve them in planning the meal. Their choices will make it less likely foods will be traded, go in the garbage or come home uneaten. As a rule of thumb, make sure lunches include at least three of five food groups recognized by the U.S. Department of Agriculture's MyPyramid program online at www.mypyramid.gov . If packing a lunch, also think about food safety and storage. Is there a refrigerator in which lunch can be stored, or will it be in a classroom or locker?
NEWS
by LYNN F. LITTLE | September 6, 2006
Tailgating parties are synonymous with fall game-day fun. Handling food properly in the stadium parking lot is just as important as handling food safely at home. Don't let safety mistakes spoil your tailgating party. National statistics indicate that millions of people are sickened by food poisoning each year, and thousands die. Illness can occur within an hour of consuming spoiled food, or it can develop days later, depending on the bacteria present. Washing your hands before and after handling food is critical.
NEWS
By Thomas Voting Reports | March 5, 2006
HOUSE Food labeling, safety On a procedural vote of 216 for and 197 against, the House on March 2 advanced a bill (HR 4167) to federalize and make uniform the food safety and labeling laws of the 50 states. By imposing federal standards, the bill would pre-empt state and local regulations that exceed those set by federal law. Backers said the bill would add much-needed nationwide uniformity to food handling and labeling, while opponents said it would leave consumers with food that is less safe and less healthy.
NEWS
by LYNN F. LITTLE | September 28, 2005
By definition, the word "tailgating" describes a picnic served on the tailgate of a vehicle. It doesn't bring to mind the most sanitary conditions, but a good plan can improve food safety for these picnics. Arriving several hours before an event means plenty of time for set up and making sure the food is kept safe to eat, and time for clean up, too. Arriving about three hours early will enable you to unpack, set up, fire up the grill and start serving food at least an hour before the start of a game or race.
NEWS
September 6, 2005
The University of Maryland's College of Agriculture and Natural Resources has a new dean, Dr. Cheng-i Wei. "I'm enthusiastic about the opportunities that are available to both the college and Maryland's diverse agricultural industries," Wei said. "And I hope to start meeting and getting to know not only our faculty, staff and students on campus, but also our alumni and friends throughout the state. " Wei earned a B.S. in biology from the Tunghai University of Taiwan in 1970, an M.S. in medical microbiology from National Taiwan University in 1972, and a Ph.D.
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