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NEWS
August 14, 2009
Book signing at Rouzerfest ROUZERVILLE, Pa. - Local author Robert L. Saunders will sign his latest book, "John Paul Jones: Finding the Forgotten Patriot," from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Saturday, Aug. 15, at Rouzerfest, Red Run Park, Pa. 16, east of Waynesboro. Interfaith family picnic The annual Interfaith Family Picnic will be from 1 to 4 p.m. Sunday, Aug. 16, at City Park, 501 Virginia Ave., Hagerstown. The picnic will be in the pavilion next to the concession stand.
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NEWS
By KRISTY SMITH / 301-432-8615 | July 21, 2009
o Read more Kristy Smith columns at washingtoncountyliving.com Food safety program planned for Aug. 19 by Recycling Task Force Anyone involved with food preparation for family reunions, church dinners, community gatherings or concession stands will be interested in this program on food safety sponsored by the Boonsboro Recycling Task Force. Christopher Herrmann, an expert in food safety, will present an hourlong program titled, "Cooking for Groups - A Volunteer's Guide to Food Safety" from 7 to 8 p.m. Wednesday, Aug. 19, at the Boonsboro Community Center in Shafer Park.
NEWS
By TIFFANY ARNOLD | May 20, 2009
To freeze or not to freeze? The answer to that question could do more than save your food. It could save you money. Whether you are a single person just getting the swing of cooking for yourself, or a family with food by the freezerful, it's never too late, or too soon to go back to freezer basics - giving you the most bang for your buck. "Freezing is like suspending food in time," said Sandy McCurdy, a spokeswoman with the Institute of Food Technologists (IFT), a trade group for food scientists.
NEWS
By LYNN LITTLE | May 6, 2009
You can't see them, smell them or taste them, but they can cause sickness and sometimes death in the kitchen. We're talking, of course, about microorganisms in food. Food might cause illness if it's been contaminated with microorganisms such as parasites, viruses or bacteria. At the right temperature, in just a few hours, even small amounts of bacteria can multiply to dangerous levels on susceptible foods and cause foodborne illness. Safety is key. Food needs to be cared for safely from the time it's purchased until it's eaten.
NEWS
By CHINA MILLMAN / Pittsburgh Post-Gazette | January 20, 2009
Between the cold and the exercise, skiing makes everyone extra hungry, so there's nothing worse than being stuck with expensive lodge food that's high in fat and low on taste. There are plenty of snacks or even whole meals you can bring along to your ski excursion that will give you the nutrients you need and the taste you want. Leslie Bonci, a registered dietitian and certified specialist in sports dietetics at the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center Sports Medicine, said that when you're skiing, you're going to want something substantial to eat. Look for protein sources -- not just chips and candy.
NEWS
By LYNN LITTLE | September 10, 2008
Food handling and food safety risks at home are more common than most people thin. But four easy steps - clean, separate, cook and chill - can help prevent harmful bacteria from making your family sick. Clean - Do you know the most important thing you can do to keep from getting sick? It only takes 20 seconds, almost everyone can do it, and it's not expensive. Wash your hands. That's it. And while washing away, sing the "Happy Birthday" song to yourself twice. Teach all family members to wash their hands with hot, soapy water before fixing or eating foods and after handling pets, going to the bathroom, combing your hair, coughing or blowing your nose.
NEWS
By LYNN LITTLE | August 27, 2008
Packing a lunch can save money, but that's not the only reason to do it. Involving children in the process can help them learn about food, food safety, nutrition, health and basic kitchen skills. Lunch prep Make packing lunch fun. Set aside "let's do lunch" time for the whole family or one-on-one between parent and child. If time is typically tight in the morning, partially prepare lunch the night before or on the weekend. Plan a sandwich-making session on Sunday evening, then wrap in plastic wrap, then in aluminum foil, freezer paper or bag, and freeze a sandwich for each day of the week.
NEWS
By LYNN LITTLE | July 23, 2008
Raccoons once had a reputation as being fastidious eaters. They were said to always wash dirt from the fruits and vegetables before eating. Scientists have debunked that old superstition, though the reason for raccoons' occasional food washing remains a mystery. But washing fruits and vegetables remains a good idea for humans. Food safety experts recommend washing all fruits and vegetables with plain, cool tap water to remove contamination. Start by making sure your hands are clean.
NEWS
By LYNN LITTLE | May 21, 2008
Memorial Day marks the beginning of the summer grilling season. Grilling, one of the easiest low-fat cooking methods, can be a centerpiece for summertime meals. It is important to follow food safety guidelines to prevent harmful bacteria from multiplying and causing foodborne illness. Grills need annual cleaning after winter storage by scouring the grate with a wire brush. Spray the grid with oven cleaner and rinse thoroughly. Before each use, remove charred food debris to reduce exposure to possible cancer-causing substances formed during high heat cooking.
NEWS
By LYNN LITTLE | April 9, 2008
Eating a variety of foods is recommended for health. But trying to overhaul your own or your family's eating habits can be a challenge. Food likes, dislikes and eating habits might date back to a person's childhood. If daddy didn't like peas, chances are little Seth grew up not liking peas, too. The good news is that it's never too late to start eating a greater variety of foods that contribute to health. You will be most successful if you aim for gradual changes, rather than making an issue of food.
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