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NEWS
Lynn Little | June 26, 2012
Violent storms can happen quickly and unexpectedly during the summer.  Oftentimes, homes can lose power during those storms leaving many people wondering about the safety of refrigerated and frozen foods. Monitoring food storage temperatures can be especially important during a power outage. At the same time, opening freezer and refrigerator doors should be kept to a minimum. Food safety experts recommend checking food storage temperatures every four hours. The key temperature is 40 degrees.
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NEWS
by LYNN F. LITTLE | April 21, 2004
Leftovers can simplify meal preparation to a point where experienced cooks often cook more than needed so they can have several meals with minimal effort. Planning for leftovers can stretch meal and food dollars. When saving leftovers, consider packaging in single servings. These can be handy for lunch and snacks and also good when added to soups and stews. Combine several single-serving containers of leftovers such as spaghetti sauce to complete a family meal. Some tips to keep leftovers safe include: Cool food in the refrigerator and not on the kitchen counter.
NEWS
January 30, 2012
Have you ever been told that your favorite homemade bread or salsa is “good enough to sell?” Do you have additional fruit or vegetables from your farm or home garden that you would like to make into a commercial product?  Food for Profit is a one-day workshop designed to help you work through the maze of local and state regulations, food safety issues and business management concepts that all must be considered in setting up a commercial food business.  The course will be held at the Washington County Agricultural Education Center, 7303 Sharpsburg Pike (building door No. 4)
NEWS
May 8, 2012
Food for Profit, a one-day workshop, will be held Wednesday, June 6, from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. at Washington County Agricultural Education Center (building door No. 4), at 7303 Sharpsburg Pike. The workshop is designed to help participants work through the maze of local and state regulations, food safety issues, and business management concepts that all must be considered in setting up a commercial food business.  The Penn State Extension's course is co-sponsored by Maryland Rural Enterprise Development Center, University of Maryland Extension and Hagerstown-Washington County Economic Development Commission.
NEWS
by LYNN F. LITTLE | June 23, 2004
The number of food-borne illnesses increases during the summer. Bacteria love the hot, humid days of summer and grow faster then than at any other time of the year. At the same time temperatures rise, we're more likely to leave food unrefrigerated for longer time periods. Food sits out at picnics, barbecues and during travel. Washing facilities and thermostat-controlled cooking appliances often are not available at picnic sites. People may leave their food thermometer in their kitchen when cooking outdoors.
NEWS
by Lynn Little | June 15, 2005
Hamburgers are one of the most popular meats found on home grills. Following a few simple tips and techniques can help you build a better burger in terms of nutritional value and food safety. You can improve the nutritional value of the hamburger by using some of the advice found in the new U.S. Dietary Guidelines and MyPyramid. Use a whole-grain bun as the foundation for the sandwich. A regular-sized hamburger bun weighs 2 ounces and counts as two servings from the bread and grain group.
NEWS
by LYNN F. LITTLE | March 21, 2007
"Eat this; don't eat that. " If only it were so simple. Eating a variety of foods is recommended for health, but trying to overhaul your or your family's eating habits can be a challenge. Food likes, dislikes and eating habits can date back to a person's childhood. If Daddy didn't like peas, chances are little Seth didn't grow up liking them, either. The good news is that it's never too late to start eating a greater variety of foods that contribute to good health. Aim for gradual changes, rather than making an issue of food.
NEWS
By LYNN LITTLE | September 10, 2008
Food handling and food safety risks at home are more common than most people thin. But four easy steps - clean, separate, cook and chill - can help prevent harmful bacteria from making your family sick. Clean - Do you know the most important thing you can do to keep from getting sick? It only takes 20 seconds, almost everyone can do it, and it's not expensive. Wash your hands. That's it. And while washing away, sing the "Happy Birthday" song to yourself twice. Teach all family members to wash their hands with hot, soapy water before fixing or eating foods and after handling pets, going to the bathroom, combing your hair, coughing or blowing your nose.
NEWS
by LYNN F. LITTLE | July 13, 2005
Growing interest in gardening and farmers markets, a desire to increase the number of fruit and vegetable servings, and popular television food shows are stimulating interest in home cooking and food preservation. Home food preservation, canning and freezing, require some time, but advances in food safety, science and technology have simplified the process of preserving summer-fresh fruits and vegetables at home. With proper planning and equipment, home food preservation is relatively straightforward.
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