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NEWS
Lynn Little | August 20, 2013
Packing a lunch can save money, but that's not the only reason to do it. Involving your children in the process can help them learn about food, food safety, nutrition, health and basic kitchen skills.  Make packing lunch fun. Set aside “let's do lunch” family or one-on-one time. If time is typically tight in the morning, partially prepare lunch the night before. Plan a sandwich-making session on Sunday evening, wrap in plastic wrap, then in aluminum foil, freezer paper or bag and freeze a sandwich for each day of the week.  Sandwiches made with peanut butter, cream cheese, processed cheese, luncheon meats or salad mixtures such as tuna, chicken or ham prepared with a small amount of mayonnaise freeze well and can be frozen for one to two weeks.  Freezing will help protect a sandwich, food safety-wise.
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NEWS
by LYNN F. LITTLE | September 28, 2005
By definition, the word "tailgating" describes a picnic served on the tailgate of a vehicle. It doesn't bring to mind the most sanitary conditions, but a good plan can improve food safety for these picnics. Arriving several hours before an event means plenty of time for set up and making sure the food is kept safe to eat, and time for clean up, too. Arriving about three hours early will enable you to unpack, set up, fire up the grill and start serving food at least an hour before the start of a game or race.
NEWS
April 21, 1998
Have you or people you know been mislead by food safety myths? Misconceptions about food safety abound and can make us sick! Check your food safety savvy against the statements that follow. Myth : "If it tastes OK, it's safe to eat. " Fact : If you trust your taste buds to detect unsafe food, you may be in trouble. Many people think a food is safe to eat if it tastes, smells or looks all right. The National Center for Health Statistics estimates that over 9,000 people in the United States die yearly from food borne illness.
NEWS
By LYNN LITTLE | July 23, 2008
Raccoons once had a reputation as being fastidious eaters. They were said to always wash dirt from the fruits and vegetables before eating. Scientists have debunked that old superstition, though the reason for raccoons' occasional food washing remains a mystery. But washing fruits and vegetables remains a good idea for humans. Food safety experts recommend washing all fruits and vegetables with plain, cool tap water to remove contamination. Start by making sure your hands are clean.
NEWS
September 21, 1997
MARTINSBURG, W.Va. - The Berkeley County Health Department will hold the annual Manager's Food Service Educational Conference and Awards Ceremony at 7 p.m. Thursday, Oct. 9 at James Rumsey Technical Institute on W.Va. 9 west of Martinsburg. The conference will feature FDA and USDA representatives speaking on food safety, food recalls and technology. The Hudson Hamburger recall will also be discussed. All food service facility managers are required to attend a yearly educational conference training course with designated time, place and educational material provided by the Berkeley County Health Department.
NEWS
Lynn Little | July 9, 2013
When eating outdoors while traveling or picnicking away from home, it's important to take follow some basic food safety rules to reduce the risk of foodborne illness. Cases of food poisoning peak in the summer months, so if you are on the move it is important to follow food safety rules. Soap and water are essential to cleanliness. Bring your own soap and water to your picnic or campsite. If water for hand washing is not available, disposable wipes or hand sanitizer will do. Wash your hands before and after handling food.
NEWS
September 6, 2005
The University of Maryland's College of Agriculture and Natural Resources has a new dean, Dr. Cheng-i Wei. "I'm enthusiastic about the opportunities that are available to both the college and Maryland's diverse agricultural industries," Wei said. "And I hope to start meeting and getting to know not only our faculty, staff and students on campus, but also our alumni and friends throughout the state. " Wei earned a B.S. in biology from the Tunghai University of Taiwan in 1970, an M.S. in medical microbiology from National Taiwan University in 1972, and a Ph.D.
NEWS
October 25, 1997
By LAURA ERNDE Staff Writer If you order a rare hamburger at the Historic Hilltop House, you just might find Rodney Miller at your table trying to talk you out of it. "I'll tell them I want to cook it to at least medium. I basically push to sell it well," said Miller, assistant cook at the Harpers Ferry, W.Va., restaurant. Amid a series of outbreaks of food-borne illnesses across the country, Tri-State area restaurants have all but abandoned the rare hamburger. Federal inspectors this week said they have discovered for the first time E. coli contamination in imported ground beef, preventing more than 34,000 pounds of the Canadian product from getting into the marketplace.
NEWS
May 20, 1997
Picnic safety Don't allow foodborne illness to spoil your day By TERI JOHNSON Staff Writer It's no picnic when food poisoning invades your gathering. There is a significant rise in foodborne illness in the summer, says Diane Van, acting supervisor of United States Department of Agriculture's Meat and Poultry Hotline. Each year an estimated 4,000 deaths and 5 million sicknesses result from food-borne illnesses from the consumption of meat and poultry products, Van says.
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