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NEWS
By TIM ROWLAND | March 19, 2009
We're all aware of the great grocery downsizing scam that's taking center stage at your local supermarket. But strangely enough, I'm not mad about that. I've always admired creative thinking, and for that reason alone I have to stand up and applaud the consumer-product packing divisions across this great land of ours. First, this isn't new. Vending machine candy bars were way ahead of the curve, and they were pretty slick about it. They'd say, "Hey, we're lowering the price on Snickers.
NEWS
By CALEB CALHOUN | caleb.calhoun@herald-mail.com | May 18, 2012
More than 200 people turned out Friday looking for jobs with 15 employers at a job fair at the Washington County One Stop Job Center in Hagerstown, according to job center Supervisor Cinda Quail. Michael Payne, 21, of Hagerstown visited the fair at 14 N. Potomac St. with an open mind about his options, but he said he is good with construction. “I've built bird houses from scratch,” he said. “I'm very good at building stuff.” Payne, who is unemployed, said he found out about the job fair on the Internet and was looking for whatever he can find.
NEWS
by BONNIE H. BRECHBILL | January 31, 2004
bonnieb@herald-mail.com The consumer drives the food industry. The U.S. population currently is about 290 million with less than 2 percent growth per year, but some sectors of the food market are growing much more quickly. Food companies focus on those segments, such as organic, soy, vegetarian and health foods, according to John B. Lord, professor of food marketing at St. Joseph's University in Philadelphia. Lord's professional interests focus on the changing eating patterns of the American consumer and how food companies are responding to the consumer challenge.
NEWS
By CHAD SMITH / For The Herald-Mail | May 11, 2009
With the continued rise of childhood obesity in the United States, I think it's time to take a good, hard look at what the causes are for this scary trend. I'm going to ruffle some feathers with this one because I'm calling out the parties most responsible for the terrible disservice that our kids are being dealt in our increasingly inactive nation: parents. It would be easy to blame the schools for cutting back on physical education or the food industry for aggressively marketing crap food to young consumers.
NEWS
Chad Smith | April 15, 2011
With childhood obesity on the rise in the United States, I think it's time to take a good, hard look at what the causes are for this scary trend. I'm going to rustle some feathers with this one because I'm calling out the parties most responsible for the terrible disservice that our kids are being dealt in our increasingly inactive nation: parents. It would be real easy to blame the schools for cutting back on physical education or the food industry for aggressively targeting young consumers to sell crap food.
NEWS
By CHAD SMITH / Special to The Herald-Mail | May 3, 2010
Editor's note: Chad Smith's computer ate his homework. Here is a column he wrote last May. Parents, start your kids right. With the continued rise of childhood obesity in the United States, I think it's time to take a good, hard look at what the causes are for this scary trend. I'm going to ruffle some feathers with this one because I'm calling out the parties most responsible for the terrible disservice that our kids are being dealt in our increasingly inactive nation: parents.
NEWS
By CHAD SMITH / Special to The Herald-Mail | November 9, 2009
Kellogg Co. recently raised some eyebrows when it claimed that its Rice Krispies cereal now "supports your child's immunity. " Because this claim came at a time when the H1N1 flu was running rampant across the country, the move was seen in some circles as a bit opportunistic. In fact, the City of San Francisco sent a letter to Kellogg and the U.S. Food and Drug Administration asking for proof of the claim.The proof wasn't provided. Kellogg began adding antioxidants (immunity-supporting vitamins)
LIFESTYLE
BY TIFFANY ARNOLD | tiffanya@herald-mail.com | March 1, 2011
There are no lunch ladies at Washington County Technical High School. However, you might find a 17-year-old with aspirations of enrolling in culinary school or a few kids manning the stove out of sheer curiosity. But there are definitely no lunch ladies. At Tech High, the students are the ones who cook the food and serve it to their fellow students and teachers. And they've won fans among their classmates and teachers. "I eat it every day," said Tech High principal Jeffrey Stouffer.
NEWS
By JEFF SEMLER | April 29, 2008
Spring is here and, with it, the growing season. If you farm or plant a garden, you have been toiling for some time now because, as you know, work starts before the temperature starts to rise. If you are a consumer (and we all are), then, I hope your favorite time of year is arriving - and that is when we can buy local food for our dinner tables. David Bennett of the Farm Press reported on a recently released survey by the Center for Food Integrity that showed an alarming number of U.S. consumers are oddly unaware of the role farmers' play in providing food to the world.
NEWS
By ALICIA NOTARIANNI | April 5, 2010
Editor's note: In February, we asked readers to tell us about some of our oldest residents of the Tri-State area. We received about a dozen nominations and have profiled six of the centenarians. The stories began Sunday and continue through Wednesday. FAYETTEVILLE, PA. -- "Mom, I got a second job," a young Cliff Springer told his mother. "Two? That's it? Only two?" was her reply. As one who peddled vegetables and newspapersas agirl, supported five brothers as a young woman, and later juggled three or more jobs at a time even as she raised her son, Mary Louise Correal Springer was not all that impressed.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By CALEB CALHOUN | caleb.calhoun@herald-mail.com | May 18, 2012
More than 200 people turned out Friday looking for jobs with 15 employers at a job fair at the Washington County One Stop Job Center in Hagerstown, according to job center Supervisor Cinda Quail. Michael Payne, 21, of Hagerstown visited the fair at 14 N. Potomac St. with an open mind about his options, but he said he is good with construction. “I've built bird houses from scratch,” he said. “I'm very good at building stuff.” Payne, who is unemployed, said he found out about the job fair on the Internet and was looking for whatever he can find.
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NEWS
Chad Smith | April 15, 2011
With childhood obesity on the rise in the United States, I think it's time to take a good, hard look at what the causes are for this scary trend. I'm going to rustle some feathers with this one because I'm calling out the parties most responsible for the terrible disservice that our kids are being dealt in our increasingly inactive nation: parents. It would be real easy to blame the schools for cutting back on physical education or the food industry for aggressively targeting young consumers to sell crap food.
LIFESTYLE
BY TIFFANY ARNOLD | tiffanya@herald-mail.com | March 1, 2011
There are no lunch ladies at Washington County Technical High School. However, you might find a 17-year-old with aspirations of enrolling in culinary school or a few kids manning the stove out of sheer curiosity. But there are definitely no lunch ladies. At Tech High, the students are the ones who cook the food and serve it to their fellow students and teachers. And they've won fans among their classmates and teachers. "I eat it every day," said Tech High principal Jeffrey Stouffer.
NEWS
By CHAD SMITH / Special to The Herald-Mail | May 3, 2010
Editor's note: Chad Smith's computer ate his homework. Here is a column he wrote last May. Parents, start your kids right. With the continued rise of childhood obesity in the United States, I think it's time to take a good, hard look at what the causes are for this scary trend. I'm going to ruffle some feathers with this one because I'm calling out the parties most responsible for the terrible disservice that our kids are being dealt in our increasingly inactive nation: parents.
NEWS
By ALICIA NOTARIANNI | April 5, 2010
Editor's note: In February, we asked readers to tell us about some of our oldest residents of the Tri-State area. We received about a dozen nominations and have profiled six of the centenarians. The stories began Sunday and continue through Wednesday. FAYETTEVILLE, PA. -- "Mom, I got a second job," a young Cliff Springer told his mother. "Two? That's it? Only two?" was her reply. As one who peddled vegetables and newspapersas agirl, supported five brothers as a young woman, and later juggled three or more jobs at a time even as she raised her son, Mary Louise Correal Springer was not all that impressed.
NEWS
By CHAD SMITH / Special to The Herald-Mail | November 9, 2009
Kellogg Co. recently raised some eyebrows when it claimed that its Rice Krispies cereal now "supports your child's immunity. " Because this claim came at a time when the H1N1 flu was running rampant across the country, the move was seen in some circles as a bit opportunistic. In fact, the City of San Francisco sent a letter to Kellogg and the U.S. Food and Drug Administration asking for proof of the claim.The proof wasn't provided. Kellogg began adding antioxidants (immunity-supporting vitamins)
NEWS
By CHAD SMITH / For The Herald-Mail | May 11, 2009
With the continued rise of childhood obesity in the United States, I think it's time to take a good, hard look at what the causes are for this scary trend. I'm going to ruffle some feathers with this one because I'm calling out the parties most responsible for the terrible disservice that our kids are being dealt in our increasingly inactive nation: parents. It would be easy to blame the schools for cutting back on physical education or the food industry for aggressively marketing crap food to young consumers.
NEWS
By TIM ROWLAND | March 19, 2009
We're all aware of the great grocery downsizing scam that's taking center stage at your local supermarket. But strangely enough, I'm not mad about that. I've always admired creative thinking, and for that reason alone I have to stand up and applaud the consumer-product packing divisions across this great land of ours. First, this isn't new. Vending machine candy bars were way ahead of the curve, and they were pretty slick about it. They'd say, "Hey, we're lowering the price on Snickers.
NEWS
By JEFF SEMLER | April 29, 2008
Spring is here and, with it, the growing season. If you farm or plant a garden, you have been toiling for some time now because, as you know, work starts before the temperature starts to rise. If you are a consumer (and we all are), then, I hope your favorite time of year is arriving - and that is when we can buy local food for our dinner tables. David Bennett of the Farm Press reported on a recently released survey by the Center for Food Integrity that showed an alarming number of U.S. consumers are oddly unaware of the role farmers' play in providing food to the world.
NEWS
October 13, 2004
U.S. Rep. Roscoe Bartlett, R-Md., is a 2004 recipient of the Food Distribution Industry's Thomas Jefferson Award. The Food Marketing Institute (FMI) and International Foodservice Distributors Association (IFDA) presented the award at a Sept. 22 ceremony on Capitol Hill. At the end of each Congress, FMI and IFDA present the award to senators and representatives who demonstrate their commitment to free enterprise through their votes on issues such as taxes, free trade, labor policy and other economic matters.
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