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Food Guide Pyramid

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NEWS
By Lynn F. Little | December 2, 1997
Fitting eating into pyramid plan not all that hard The Food Guide Pyramid, a guide to daily food choices, translates general nutrition advice into healthy meals. Trying to meet all the recommended servings in the Food Guide Pyramid sometimes intimidates us, but it shouldn't. We look at the number of servings for the various food groups in the pyramid and say, "I can't possibly eat all that food!" First of all, we tend to overestimate how much food makes up a serving. For example, one serving from the bread and cereal group might be 3/4 cup of cereal, a single slice of bread or 3 to 4 plain crackers.
NEWS
by LYNN F. LITTLE | April 7, 2004
Eating smart and staying healthy sounds simple. But with all the conflicting advice on what we should be eating to stay healthy, eating smart can be a challenge when considering the never-ending array of sweet and savory snack foods that fill our grocery shelves and vending machines and the focus on large portions in the restaurant industry. Eating smart doesn't have to mean giving up good taste or all your favorite foods. It does mean choosing high-calorie, high-fat foods such as chips, fries and donuts as "sometimes" foods and making lower-fat, higher-fiber choices your "everyday" foods.
NEWS
By Lynn F. Little | March 9, 1999
For years you have heard that low-fat, high-carbohydrate diets are best. Recently, however, low-carbohydrate, high-protein diets have become fashionable in some circles. So which is it, high-carb or low-carb and why do we need carbohydrates at all? [cont. from lifestyle ] Found in our most commonly eaten foods (bread, pasta, potatoes, starchy vegetables, grains, fruits and vegetables), carbohydrates provide energy for the body's most demanding tasks. When digested, they form glucose, a type of sugar that supplies our cells with the energy they need to function.
NEWS
BY LYNN F. LITTLE | March 13, 2002
Eating is one of life's greatest pleasures and today, with such a wide variety of foods available in supermarkets and restaurants, there is much room for choice in what we eat. The 2000 Dietary Guidelines for Americans offer sensible guidelines to help you with these choices. March is National Nutrition Month and a good time to refocus on dietary guidelines to help build a healthy lifestyle. The three key messages in the 2000 Dietary Guidelines are to aim for fitness, build a better base and choose sensibly.
NEWS
April 8, 1997
Grain products form the base of the Food Guide Pyramid - six to 11 servings are recommended daily. By TERI JOHNSON Staff Writer Three Washington County Hospital employees have become breadwinners of a different sort, thanks to a recent contest. The hospital's nutrition services department sponsored an in-house bread-making competition during March, which was National Nutrition Month. Employees rose to the challenge by submitting 15 entries. Bread was selected because grain products form the base of the Food Guide Pyramid, and six to 11 servings are recommended daily, says Peggy Kemp, the hospital's clinical nutrition manager.
NEWS
April 17, 2001
Build a tasty eating style There are lots of different ways to eat healthfully. Americans like to prepare and eat many different foods, depending on their cultural traditions and ethnic heritage. That's wonderful - because variety is both the spice of life and a cornerstone of good nutrition. Whatever your background, the Food Guide Pyramid can help build delicious eating habits for a lifetime of good health. Most American families need more foods from the base of the Food Pyramid - more fruits, vegetables and grains, especially whole grains.
NEWS
June 10, 1997
- by Lynn F. Little To help us improve our eating habits, the USDA developed the Food Guide Pyramid in which foods are clustered into five groups based on the nutrients they provide. For optimum health, you need the nutrients supplied by all the food groups. No one food group is more important than another, although more servings per day are required from some groups than others in order to meet daily nutrient needs. June is Dairy Month, so this is a good time to take a look at the milk, yogurt and cheese group and how we include those foods in our diets.
NEWS
by Lynn Little | December 15, 2004
What are the correct portions or serving sizes for the foods in our diet? Many of us might be surprised by how small "standard" portions or recommended serving sizes actually are. Recommended food portions, or official "serving sizes," haven't really changed over the years, but the food portions we eat have. Many experts believe this is why so many Americans are overweight. A portion can be thought of as the amount of a specific food we choose to eat for dinner, snack or other eating occasion.
NEWS
BY Lynn Little | August 14, 2002
The "tween generation" is getting a lot of attention these days. Kids 8 to 12 are the focus of several recently announced health campaigns. Medical groups, government agencies, soft drink companies and snack manufacturers are all targeting tweens with food and fitness messages. Health experts are concerned about the stage between childhood and adolescence for many reasons. When it comes to food and fitness, tween trends are going in the wrong direction. Numerous studies have documented the problems in tween nutrition and physical activity: The rates of overweight and obese children ages 8 to 12 are rising dramatically.
NEWS
September 5, 2000
Aim, build, choose for good health Eating is one of life's greatest pleasures. Today, with the wide variety of foods available to tantalize our palates, it can be even more pleasurable. Eating also is an important part of maintaining our health so we can enjoy life. How can we enjoy food while taking action for good health? The Dietary Guidelines for Americans, 2000, offer some good advice. Updated every five years since 1980, the latest version carries three basic messages: HEIGHT="6" ALT=" "> Aim for fitness.
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NEWS
by Lynn Little | December 15, 2004
What are the correct portions or serving sizes for the foods in our diet? Many of us might be surprised by how small "standard" portions or recommended serving sizes actually are. Recommended food portions, or official "serving sizes," haven't really changed over the years, but the food portions we eat have. Many experts believe this is why so many Americans are overweight. A portion can be thought of as the amount of a specific food we choose to eat for dinner, snack or other eating occasion.
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NEWS
by LYNN F. LITTLE | April 7, 2004
Eating smart and staying healthy sounds simple. But with all the conflicting advice on what we should be eating to stay healthy, eating smart can be a challenge when considering the never-ending array of sweet and savory snack foods that fill our grocery shelves and vending machines and the focus on large portions in the restaurant industry. Eating smart doesn't have to mean giving up good taste or all your favorite foods. It does mean choosing high-calorie, high-fat foods such as chips, fries and donuts as "sometimes" foods and making lower-fat, higher-fiber choices your "everyday" foods.
NEWS
BY Lynn Little | August 14, 2002
The "tween generation" is getting a lot of attention these days. Kids 8 to 12 are the focus of several recently announced health campaigns. Medical groups, government agencies, soft drink companies and snack manufacturers are all targeting tweens with food and fitness messages. Health experts are concerned about the stage between childhood and adolescence for many reasons. When it comes to food and fitness, tween trends are going in the wrong direction. Numerous studies have documented the problems in tween nutrition and physical activity: The rates of overweight and obese children ages 8 to 12 are rising dramatically.
NEWS
BY LYNN F. LITTLE | March 13, 2002
Eating is one of life's greatest pleasures and today, with such a wide variety of foods available in supermarkets and restaurants, there is much room for choice in what we eat. The 2000 Dietary Guidelines for Americans offer sensible guidelines to help you with these choices. March is National Nutrition Month and a good time to refocus on dietary guidelines to help build a healthy lifestyle. The three key messages in the 2000 Dietary Guidelines are to aim for fitness, build a better base and choose sensibly.
NEWS
May 9, 2001
Choosing tasty grains for health According to a recent Gallup survey, Americans know about the wholesome goodness of grains. Unfortunately, confusion and misperceptions seem to keep us from enjoying their health benefits. Americans recognize that grain foods are healthy foods. The problem is that they aren't eating enough grains, especially whole grains, to enjoy their health-enhancing, disease-fighting nutrients. The Gallup survey highlighted the myths and misperceptions that keep us from getting the grains our bodies need.
NEWS
April 17, 2001
Build a tasty eating style There are lots of different ways to eat healthfully. Americans like to prepare and eat many different foods, depending on their cultural traditions and ethnic heritage. That's wonderful - because variety is both the spice of life and a cornerstone of good nutrition. Whatever your background, the Food Guide Pyramid can help build delicious eating habits for a lifetime of good health. Most American families need more foods from the base of the Food Pyramid - more fruits, vegetables and grains, especially whole grains.
NEWS
November 7, 2000
Portion distortion: Do you want that super-sized? Do you want that super-sized? As Americans increasingly cruise through the drive-through for meals, it is evident that portion size matters to people. In most cases, the bigger the portion, the better. Could there be a link between increased portion sizes and the obesity epidemic in the United States? Are super-sized foods contributing to more super-sized people? continued Misjudging food-serving sizes is one of the most common mistakes people make when evaluating their diet.
NEWS
September 5, 2000
Aim, build, choose for good health Eating is one of life's greatest pleasures. Today, with the wide variety of foods available to tantalize our palates, it can be even more pleasurable. Eating also is an important part of maintaining our health so we can enjoy life. How can we enjoy food while taking action for good health? The Dietary Guidelines for Americans, 2000, offer some good advice. Updated every five years since 1980, the latest version carries three basic messages: HEIGHT="6" ALT=" "> Aim for fitness.
NEWS
By Lynn F. Little | March 9, 1999
For years you have heard that low-fat, high-carbohydrate diets are best. Recently, however, low-carbohydrate, high-protein diets have become fashionable in some circles. So which is it, high-carb or low-carb and why do we need carbohydrates at all? [cont. from lifestyle ] Found in our most commonly eaten foods (bread, pasta, potatoes, starchy vegetables, grains, fruits and vegetables), carbohydrates provide energy for the body's most demanding tasks. When digested, they form glucose, a type of sugar that supplies our cells with the energy they need to function.
NEWS
By Lynn F. Little | December 2, 1997
Fitting eating into pyramid plan not all that hard The Food Guide Pyramid, a guide to daily food choices, translates general nutrition advice into healthy meals. Trying to meet all the recommended servings in the Food Guide Pyramid sometimes intimidates us, but it shouldn't. We look at the number of servings for the various food groups in the pyramid and say, "I can't possibly eat all that food!" First of all, we tend to overestimate how much food makes up a serving. For example, one serving from the bread and cereal group might be 3/4 cup of cereal, a single slice of bread or 3 to 4 plain crackers.
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