Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: HeraldMail HomeCollectionsFlu Season
IN THE NEWS

Flu Season

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
By CALEB CALHOUN | caleb.calhoun@herald-mail.com | January 3, 2013
Smithsburg Family Medical Center Physician Dr. Gail Callaway had seen five patients Wednesday who had the flu, including a couple of whom had gotten their flu vaccinations. “The flu shot protects people against three strains of the flu, and two of the strains this year were new,” she said. “You can still get the flu if you get the flu shot but it's not as severe as it would be if you didn't get it.” A patient with the flu who got a flu shot could have gotten a different strain of the flu other than the three in the vaccine, Callaway said.
NEWS
November 21, 1997
By MARLO BARNHART Staff Writer While the first two cases of Influenza A have been confirmed in Kent County, Md., for the 1997-98 season, there are still no reported cases in Washington County. Linda Humbert, director of nursing at the Washington County Health Department, said Friday that 4,700 flu shots and 570 pneumonia shots were administered during a number of recent clinics. "We are still giving pneumonia shots," Humbert said. Anyone wishing to get a pneumonia shot can call 301-791-3210 for an appointment.
NEWS
January 12, 2013
In West Virginia, Berkeley County Health Department officials told county leaders Thursday that the severity of the flu season in the community appears evident. The health department received 184 reports of influenza-like illness from doctors' offices in December, compared to a total of 100 from January to November 2012, according to Health Department Administrator Bill Kearns. The health department has provided more than 4,000 flu vaccinations since September and Kearns anticipated the total could exceed 5,000 for the season because their flu vaccine clinics have been just as busy as they were in September and October.
NEWS
by TIFFANY ARNOLD | November 6, 2006
Flu season has officially begun in Maryland. The first confirmed case of seasonal influenza in Maryland was announced Monday, Oct. 31. The timing of this year's first case is comparable to last year, as the first case was reported Nov. 3, 2005, state health officials said. Flu season generally begins in October and can last through May. According to the Centers for Disease Control, 5 percent to 20 percent of the U.S. population - 15 million to 60 million people - contract the seasonal flu virus each year.
NEWS
DAN KULIN /Staff Writer | March 21, 2002
In Berkeley County, W.Va., the number of reported influenza-like cases dropped by almost 38 percent this winter, while the county health department gave out about 38 percent more flu shots this flu season than last. To County Health Department Acting Nurse Director Sandy LeMaster, the message is clear. "More people were vaccinated and it paid off," she said last week. LeMaster said that at this time last winter there were 2,224 reported flu-like cases and 1,173 people had been vaccinated.
NEWS
by TARA REILLY | October 29, 2003
tarar@herald-mail.com While flu season typically peaks from January through March, the Washington County Health Department is encouraging all county residents to get their vaccinations early. The Health Department will hold six flu and pneumonia vaccine clinics throughout the county beginning Nov. 13. "It takes a couple of weeks for people's immunity to build up," said health department Public Information Officer Rod MacRae. "An early vaccination is considered to be your best protection.
NEWS
October 5, 1999
In preparation for the flu season, Washington County Commissioners President Gregory I. Snook, Commissioners Bert L. Iseminger and John L. Schnebly, County Administrator Rodney Shoop and County Attorney Richard Douglas got flu shots from the Washington County Health Department Wednesday. The flu season is November to April. Department spokesman Betty Shank denied long-standing rumors that one can get flu from the shots. Shank encouraged everyone to get flu shots. For information call 301 791-3210.
NEWS
By TIFFANY ARNOLD | March 10, 2008
With the arrival of peak flu season comes a recommendation to vaccinate more children, and concerns that the current round of vaccines won't offer protection against a new flu strain. Health officials warn that this season's vaccines might not offer full protection from a new flu strain, A/Brisbane, that emerged after this year's batch was made. Also, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention have expanded recommendations for child vaccines to include children ages 5 to 18. Formerly, the CDC recommended vaccines for children aged 6 months to 4 years, 11 months.
NEWS
By TERRY TALBERT | February 8, 1998
Flu lays low locally With the flu season more than half over, it appears Washington County residents may escape this year's bug relatively unscathed. The influenza season extends from December through February, and sometimes into March, according to Washington County Health Officer Dr. Robert Parker. School absenteeism is used as a measure of the severity of the flu season. Local schools report to the county health department when their absentee rates due to illness reach 10 percent, Parker said.
NEWS
October 7, 2000
Flu vaccine to begin arriving here next month By DAN KULIN / Staff Writer The first shipment of flu vaccinations will arrive in Washington County by mid-November and the remainder are expected in early December, according to a statement from the county health department. High-risk individuals will be given the vaccinations first. According to the statement, people considered high-risk include anyone 65 or older, residents of nursing homes and chronic care facilities, anyone with chronic disorders of the pulmonary and cardiovascular system including asthma, those hospitalized in the past year for chronic metabolic diseases including diabetes mellitus, those with renal disease or immunosuppression, those 6 months old to 18 years old receiving long-term aspirin therapy that may put them at risk for developing Reye Syndrome after influenza infection, and women who will be in their second or third trimester of pregnancy during the flu season.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
January 12, 2013
In West Virginia, Berkeley County Health Department officials told county leaders Thursday that the severity of the flu season in the community appears evident. The health department received 184 reports of influenza-like illness from doctors' offices in December, compared to a total of 100 from January to November 2012, according to Health Department Administrator Bill Kearns. The health department has provided more than 4,000 flu vaccinations since September and Kearns anticipated the total could exceed 5,000 for the season because their flu vaccine clinics have been just as busy as they were in September and October.
Advertisement
LIFESTYLE
January 11, 2013
The Washington County Health Department will hold flu vaccination clinics on the following dates and times: Monday, Jan. 14, 1 to 4:30 p.m. Wednesday, Jan. 16, 9 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Friday, Jan. 18, 1 to 4:30 p.m. Friday, Jan. 25, 1 to 4:30 p.m. All clinics will be held at the Health Department's main building at 1302 Pennsylvania Avenue, Hagerstown. Medicare is accepted for adult vaccination, but no other insurance will be billed. A donation of $20 is appreciated.
NEWS
By CALEB CALHOUN | caleb.calhoun@herald-mail.com | January 3, 2013
Smithsburg Family Medical Center Physician Dr. Gail Callaway had seen five patients Wednesday who had the flu, including a couple of whom had gotten their flu vaccinations. “The flu shot protects people against three strains of the flu, and two of the strains this year were new,” she said. “You can still get the flu if you get the flu shot but it's not as severe as it would be if you didn't get it.” A patient with the flu who got a flu shot could have gotten a different strain of the flu other than the three in the vaccine, Callaway said.
LIFESTYLE
By MARIE GILBERT | marieg@herald-mail.com | November 11, 2011
It might not be the subject of fundraisers and walk-a-thons. But make no mistake, says the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Like cancer, AIDS, heart disease and a host of other medical maladies, influenza can be a killer. On average, flu claims the lives of 36,000 Americans each year and the death toll can double in severe seasons. Combined with pneumonia, influenza is the nation's fifth leading cause of death in individuals 65 years of age and older. In addition, flu and its related complications result in approximately 226,000 hospitalizations and costs the economy about $12 billion annually.  But, to many people, flu is considered nothing more than a serious cold - a nuisance that can't be prevented.
NEWS
By KATE S. ALEXANDER | October 9, 2009
GREENCASTLE, PA. -- The Borough of Greencastle will not send volunteers door-to-door in town with information about H1N1, or the swine flu virus, as it originally planned. Emergency Management Coordinator Ben Thomas Jr. said he decided against his plan to take information around to residents because daylight is rapidly fading. He said he plans instead to have the information available around town. "I am canceling the door-to-door campaign for H1N1 handout distribution due to the fall season's arrival and lack of daylight for the safety of the young people who would be volunteering," he said.
NEWS
By ANDREW SCHOTZ and MARLO BARNHART | October 8, 2009
Correction The following story contained incorrect information about Western Maryland Hospital Center employees with flu-like symptoms. At the time, eight employees at the center had experienced the symptoms within a period of about 10 days, according to Melissa Hutton, the center's interim infection preventionist. Four employees were in one unit. The center had increased to a Level 3 alert stage, on a scale of 1 to 5. As of Thursday, Oct. 15, the flu concern had diminished and the center had dropped to a Level 2 alert stage, Hutton said.
NEWS
September 5, 2009
Editor's note: The Herald-Mail invites readers to answer poll questions on www.herald-mail.com. Readers also may submit comments about the poll question when voting. A sampling of edited reader comments will run on The Herald-Mail's Opinion page on Tuesday, Thursday and Sunday. The question posted Wednesday on The Herald-Mail's Web site was: Was the State of Maryland's decision to cut back on spending for state health departments a wise decision with flu season approaching?
NEWS
May 6, 2009
Excerpts from a press briefing on Monday, May 4, by Richard Besser, acting director of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention: "While we're not out of the woods, we are seeing a lot of encouraging signs, and I want to share with you some of that information. "It appears things are leveling off in Mexico. They are reporting less activity in Mexico City. But as we're seeing here, they're seeing different things in different parts of the country. "I like to ... put this in context with seasonal flu. With seasonal flu, we see in the United States over 30 million cases (annually)
NEWS
October 10, 2008
HCC Learning Center hosts anniversary open house The HCC Children's Learning Center will hold an open house in honor of its 10th anniversary on Saturday, Oct. 11, from 9 a.m. to noon. HCC students, faculty and staff or anyone who had a child enrolled at the center between 1998 and 2008 are invited. The event will feature a variety of fun activities for children, including a moon bounce and a clown, as well as cake and refreshments. Call Terry Kitchen, 301-790-2800, ext. 322. Frontier re-enactors will visit Fort Frederick Members of Cresap's Company will garrison Fort Frederick, perform living history demonstrations and explain life on the Maryland frontier during the French and Indian War. Saturday and Sunday, Oct. 11 and Oct. 12, from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Indian traders will come to the fort on both days.
NEWS
By DAN DEARTH | October 4, 2008
HAGERSTOWN - Hagerstown resident Talita Rodriguez didn't even have to leave her car to receive a flu shot Friday afternoon at North Hagerstown High School. The nurses came to her. "I think it's wonderful," Rodriguez said. "I've never seen anything like it before. It's a great idea to help the handicapped and the elderly. " Rodriguez was among several hundred Washington County residents who took advantage of the Washington County Health Department's Flu Clinic on Friday afternoon.
The Herald-Mail Articles
|